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RE: [art_education] radial symmetry questions - I found the answer

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  • Hillmer, Jan
    It took some creative googling to find the answer. At first I couldn t find what I was seeking. The answer can be found here
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 3, 2009
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      It took some creative googling to find the answer.    At first I couldn’t find what I was seeking.

       

      The answer can be found here    http://pluto.huji.ac.il/~msdanet/cyberpl@y/chapter6b.html 

      The asymmetrical section that is simply repeated around is called “translation” or “glide” symmetry.

      The asymmetrical section that is flipped is called “bilateral” or “reflection” or “mirror” symmetry. 

       

      More types of symmetry are mentioned, but these are the ones I was wondering about.


      Thanks for thinking with me.

       

      Jan in Tampa

       

       

      ++++++++++++++++++++ 

      But here’s my question, If you create an assymetrical section, you have a choice of repeating all the way  around or flipping back and forth going around.

      So what are those types of radial symmetry called?


      Jan in Tampa

      Gr 1-5

       

       

    • KATHY TROTT
      reflection Kathy Trott NBCT 04 Visual Art Teacher Septima P. Clark Corporate Academy 1929 Grimball Road Charleston, SC 29412 Telephone: (843) 762-6217 Fax:
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 3, 2009
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        reflection

        Kathy Trott
        NBCT '04
        Visual Art Teacher
        Septima P. Clark Corporate Academy
        1929 Grimball Road
        Charleston, SC 29412
        Telephone: (843) 762-6217
        Fax: (843) 762-6218
        www.ccsdschools.com

        Excellence is our Standard

        >>> "Hillmer, Jan" <hillmjan@...> 2/3/2009 11:44 AM >>>
        Hi Everyone,



        I have a question about radial symmetry.



        When doing a project, a circle is divided into a certain number of
        evenly spaced sections, radiating out from the center.

        Then you can do a drawing in one section and repeat going around,
        especially if the design INSIDE the section is also symmetrical.



        But here's my question, If you create an assymetrical section, you have
        a choice of repeating all the way around or flipping back and forth
        going around.

        So what are those types of radial symmetry called?



        Jan in Tampa

        Gr 1-5
      • David Exner
        If the circle is evenly divided and you flip the design from side A to side B as you go around the circle you ll end up with a kaleidoscopic design or
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 3, 2009
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          If the circle is evenly divided and you flip the design from side "A" to side "B" as you go around the circle you'll end up with a kaleidoscopic design or pattern.  I find that six repetitions gives very interesting groupings because the pattern gets triangulated in the process.

          Peace,
          David Exner

          We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill


          David G. Exner
          Art Teacher & Art Club Co-Adviser
          Community High School,District 94
          WestChicago
          (630)876-6407





          -----Original Message-----
          From: "KATHY TROTT" <KATHY_TROTT@...>
          Sent 2/3/2009 1:35:49 PM
          To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [art_education] radial symmetry questions

          reflection

          Kathy Trott
          NBCT '04
          Visual Art Teacher
          Septima P. Clark Corporate Academy
          1929 Grimball Road
          Charleston, SC 29412
          Telephone: (843) 762-6217
          Fax: (843) 762-6218
          www.ccsdschools. com

          Excellence is our Standard

          >>> "Hillmer, Jan" <hillmjan@berkeleypr ep.org> 2/3/2009 11:44 AM >>>
          Hi Everyone,

          I have a question about radial symmetry.

          When doing a project, a circle is divided into a certain number of
          evenly spaced sections, radiating out from the center.

          Then you can do a drawing in one section and repeat going around,
          especially if the design INSIDE the section is also symmetrical.

          But here's my question, If you create an assymetrical section, you have
          a choice of repeating all the way around or flipping back and forth
          going around.

          So what are those types of radial symmetry called?

          Jan in Tampa

          Gr 1-5

        • Hillmer, Jan
          Thanks. I, too, prefer the flipped kaleidoscopic designs. They are much more interesting. Thanks to all who responded. Jan in Tampa
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 4, 2009
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            Thanks.  I, too, prefer the flipped kaleidoscopic designs.  They are much more interesting.

             

            Thanks to all who responded.

             

            Jan in Tampa

             


            From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David Exner
            Sent: Tuesday, February 03, 2009 3:27 PM
            To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [art_education] radial symmetry questions

             

            If the circle is evenly divided and you flip the design from side "A" to side "B" as you go around the circle you'll end up with a kaleidoscopic design or pattern.  I find that six repetitions gives very interesting groupings because the pattern gets triangulated in the process.

            Peace,
            David Exner

            We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill


            David G. Exner




          • eduk8r2@aol.com
            That is called reflection. It is like the reflected symmetry that is see when you look in a kaleidoscope. If you would like to take a look at some of my
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 4, 2009
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              That is called reflection. It is like the reflected symmetry that is see when you look in a kaleidoscope.
              If you would like to take a look at some of my student work using radial symmetry in the creation of mandala designs I have included my web page at my school.
               
              Diane Rowen Garmire
              Visual Art Teacher/ Teacher of Gifted and Talented

              (to visit Diane's web page: Spokaneschools.org
              go to Visit our Schools, go to Elementary schools
              go to Libby Center, go to Staff Information
              then scroll to Diane Garmire and click on web page)









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