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Re: [art_education] Grading HS artwork

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  • debbie nicholas
    When my students are begining a new project, they must include several things on the back of their paper written lightly in pencil: 1) their name, 2) date
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 8, 2008
      When my students are begining a new project, they must include several things on the back of their paper written lightly in pencil: 1) their name, 2) date project began, 3) title of the project, 4) grading criteria, 5) directions.  This has made the time  the students are working on the project go much smoother for me because they can look on the back of their paper for step by step instructions.  Grading in easier because I can just put the points they make on each part of the grading criteria beside their writing, this means fewer notes for me to write on the back their papers and they know by looking what they need to improve.
       
      debbie
      NE Texas

      --- On Mon, 12/8/08, mprender8888 <mprender8888@...> wrote:
      From: mprender8888 <mprender8888@...>
      Subject: [art_education] Grading HS artwork
      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, December 8, 2008, 1:15 PM

      Hi All, I have a couple policies that seem to work for me. Our school
      has a NO LATE WORK policy which I follow for general homework
      assignments. But not so much for art projects. Students generally
      work at different paces and with a different levels of detail and
      quality. So here is what I try to sticl to on every project.

      Late work: For projects, if a reasonable deadline is set I take a full
      letter grade for the first day it is late and give the students a week
      to turn it in. On the 8th day they lose another letter grade, After 2
      weeks it's a ZERO. I usually assess the class to see if the original
      deadline is appropriate and adjust it if necessary.

      Rubrics: The only fair method of grading beginning high school artwork
      is to use a rubric. A rubric that gives students credit for all
      aspects of the project does not punish students who are not good
      artists, yet try their best and follow the criteria. It also gives the
      students a concrete understanding of what they will be graded on.

      Having great examples of student work which shows the students what
      an "A" looks like and what a "C" looks like really helps.

      Finally, I try to not give an F to a student who completes the project
      on time and gives a solid effort. It's easy to pass my class with
      a "C" even a "B" but one has to be exceptional to earn an "A"


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