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Re: Discipline / Consequences

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  • aliteachesart
    Hi CIndy, One thing first- why are they acting up? Some kids act up when they don t know what to do or can t remember. I write the steps/expectations on the
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 2, 2008
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      Hi CIndy,

      One thing first- why are they acting up? Some kids act up when they
      don't know what to do or can't remember. I write the
      steps/expectations on the board so kids can refer to them and check.
      Most kids can't remember more tan 8 things to do (my lessons usually
      have like 6 steps). Since I started doing this my behavior issues
      have practically disappeared.

      I have 3 stars on the board for noise/staying on task- if they as a
      group are off I erase one or two, add them back when they are back on
      task or quieter. They earn a sticker as a class (just one on a big
      paint palette chart with all my classes), they don't win anything
      except a sticker, but it works.

      If a kid is being an imp I redirect, or tell him to walk up and check
      the steps. If I have to I write the student's name on the board and
      have him stay after class for a quick talk. Like I said it is very
      rare since I implemented written steps (with diagrams). This also
      helps bring literacy into your classroom. I hope you try it and it
      works for you. ALi B.
    • Joyce Rainwalker
      ... Cindy - The first thing you ll need to do is to check on your school s set of rules. Many have codes of conduct that are followed (for some value of
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 2, 2008
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        > ________________________________________________________________________
        > ________________________________________________________________________
        > 4. Discipline / Consequences
        > Posted by: "cinzing" cinzing@... cinzing
        > Date: Wed Oct 1, 2008 4:58 pm ((PDT))
        >
        > Hi, I am a new art teacher (elementary K-5), and I need
        > help/suggestions for consequences for rule breaking. I have a reward
        > system for class behavior and reward individual students for good
        > behavior, but I can't seem to master giving appropriate consequences
        > for individual bad behavior. I have taken away painting time, moved
        > students to the edge of the room, changed seats, etc. But, this is
        > not getting through to some students. It's so hard when you only see
        > them for 40m then don't see them for a week.
        >
        > Do you have something that works well for you? Please share!
        >
        > Do you have any sample parent contact forms to fill out quickly to
        > send with the student? Also, do you have any contract-type forms that
        > you use where the student has to write about their rule-breaking?
        >
        > Thanks so much!
        > Cindy Ingram
        > Dallas ISD
        > cinzing@...
        >
        Cindy -

        The first thing you'll need to do is to check on your school's set of
        rules. Many have codes of conduct that are followed (for some value of
        followed...) by everyone. In the absence of a shared management plan,
        it's a good idea to check with some of the experienced teachers who've
        been in that building for a while. If you have a mentor teacher (which
        you should, if this is your first year) ask for what kinds of things are
        acceptable.

        In the absence of either shared rules or a mentor of some kind, I'd at
        least talk to the classroom teacher and the counselor of your school.
        Factors like a child's history, any special behavior or learning issues,
        family or classroom dynamics - all play into what you'll choose to do.

        I'm a K-5 person, myself, with lots of years in elementary in several
        realms. I'd be glad to help with specifics if you'd like to contact me
        off list. I've done some interesting things under the heading of
        "natural consequences" that might be helpful.

        Joyce
        --
        K-5 Art Specialist
        http://EvergreenArt.Birdsong.ORG
      • Bonnie Muir
        ... ______________________________________________________________________ HI CINDY ~  Pauline Joseph, a retired TAB teacher in Newton, MA, used to have these
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 2, 2008
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          > Do you have any sample parent contact forms to fill out quickly to
          > send with the student? Also, do you have any contract-type forms that
          > you use where the student has to write about their rule-breaking?
          >
          > Thanks so much!
          > Cindy Ingram
          ______________________________________________________________________
          HI CINDY ~ 
          Pauline Joseph, a retired TAB teacher in Newton, MA, used to have these bright orange forms that looked something like this:
           
          Date:______________________________________________________
          Name: _____________________________________________________
          Today I: ____________________________________________________
          Next time I: _________________________________________________
          Signature: __________________________________________________
           
           
          She kept the forms in a file and if a student had to fill out 3 forms, then she'd call home.  Your post reminded me that I'd like to try this myself!
          Good luck ~
          Bonnie  2-3rd grade, Hopkinton, MA




          --- On Thu, 10/2/08, Joyce Rainwalker <joycerainwalker@...> wrote:
          From: Joyce Rainwalker <joycerainwalker@...>
          Subject: [art_education] Discipline / Consequences
          To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, October 2, 2008, 8:59 PM


          > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
          > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
          > 4. Discipline / Consequences
          > Posted by: "cinzing" cinzing@gmail. com cinzing
          > Date: Wed Oct 1, 2008 4:58 pm ((PDT))
          >
          > Hi, I am a new art teacher (elementary K-5), and I need
          > help/suggestions for consequences for rule breaking. I have a reward
          > system for class behavior and reward individual students for good
          > behavior, but I can't seem to master giving appropriate consequences
          > for individual bad behavior. I have taken away painting time, moved
          > students to the edge of the room, changed seats, etc. But, this is
          > not getting through to some students. It's so hard when you only see
          > them for 40m then don't see them for a week.
          >
          > Do you have something that works well for you? Please share!
          >
          > Do you have any sample parent contact forms to fill out quickly to
          > send with the student? Also, do you have any contract-type forms that
          > you use where the student has to write about their rule-breaking?
          >
          > Thanks so much!
          > Cindy Ingram
          > Dallas ISD
          > cinzing@gmail. com
          >
          Cindy -

          The first thing you'll need to do is to check on your school's set of
          rules. Many have codes of conduct that are followed (for some value of
          followed...) by everyone. In the absence of a shared management plan,
          it's a good idea to check with some of the experienced teachers who've
          been in that building for a while. If you have a mentor teacher (which
          you should, if this is your first year) ask for what kinds of things are
          acceptable.

          In the absence of either shared rules or a mentor of some kind, I'd at
          least talk to the classroom teacher and the counselor of your school.
          Factors like a child's history, any special behavior or learning issues,
          family or classroom dynamics - all play into what you'll choose to do.

          I'm a K-5 person, myself, with lots of years in elementary in several
          realms. I'd be glad to help with specifics if you'd like to contact me
          off list. I've done some interesting things under the heading of
          "natural consequences" that might be helpful.

          Joyce
          --
          K-5 Art Specialist
          http://EvergreenArt .Birdsong. ORG
        • Linda
          Hi Cindy! I think we ve all tried many different tactics to deal with discipline problems - it is a constant battle to find what works for you and the
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 3, 2008
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            Hi Cindy!
            I think we've all tried many different tactics to deal with discipline problems - it is a
            constant battle to find what works for you and the situation you are dealing with at that
            particular moment. I've tried: having each table earning points and treats (when you could
            give treats) to those kids who were fantastic, in hopes that those who were problems
            would want to improve their behavior and earn a treat, Art reports, time out, changing
            seats... The most important thing to do, no matter what you choose, is to document the
            behavior and the action you took to resolve the problem. This covers you, most
            importantly, so if you get asked about it by a parent or administrator, or if the classroom
            teacher needs the reinforcement from other teachers, you have it.
            What I'm using is a behavior log for the student to fill out and a form that I have on my
            computer that I fill in and email it to their teacher. This way the teacher has
            documentation that they can use for reinforcement in their classroom - and it shows the
            actions taken in your room. Also, if you give grades this will back you up as well.

            The behavior log just has the date, the child's name, teacher/grade, and the behavior. The
            Word document I have for my behavior form (I leave it on my desktop) lists Student name,
            teacher/grade, and a space for behavior. Below that I've listed for checking off -Action
            Taken: st. signed the behavior log, st. stood in time out, st. wrote___ sentences, st. was
            sent to the office with a discipline referral, st. was moved to another table, Other_____.

            I've also added a sheet that goes along with our IB attitudes and profiles. It asks the
            students what they did, what attitude they should have used to resolve that situation, and
            how they can prevent the situation from happening again. This paper goes back with the
            student. I do not have a copy of that here but I can email it to you if you need it.

            I hope this helps you! It is all a work in progress, constantly changing, so hang in there
            and keep enjoying what you are doing!!

            Linda

            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "cinzing" <cinzing@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi, I am a new art teacher (elementary K-5), and I need
            > help/suggestions for consequences for rule breaking. I have a reward
            > system for class behavior and reward individual students for good
            > behavior, but I can't seem to master giving appropriate consequences
            > for individual bad behavior. I have taken away painting time, moved
            > students to the edge of the room, changed seats, etc. But, this is
            > not getting through to some students. It's so hard when you only see
            > them for 40m then don't see them for a week.
            >
            > Do you have something that works well for you? Please share!
            >
            > Do you have any sample parent contact forms to fill out quickly to
            > send with the student? Also, do you have any contract-type forms that
            > you use where the student has to write about their rule-breaking?
            >
            > Thanks so much!
            > Cindy Ingram
            > Dallas ISD
            > cinzing@...
            >
          • wanda smith
            I just want to vent for a minute on the subject of discipline. Most of my discipline problems come from the students who do not choose art as an elective but
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 4, 2008
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              I just want to vent for a minute on the subject of discipline. Most
              of my discipline problems come from the students who do not choose
              art as an elective but are "stuck" in art because we don't have study
              hall. I teach 8th and 9th grades, calling parents helps with the 8th
              graders unfortunately many times the parents of the 9th graders break
              down and start sobbing or agreeing because they can't control them
              either. We do have noon detention and Saturday school so I use them
              when needed. Another problem is those students don't care if
              they "learn" the correct way to use art supplies or don't improve on
              their skills. Just my venting on this rainy Saturday, but at least
              it is cool. Wanda
              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Linda" <elleoz@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Cindy!
              > I think we've all tried many different tactics to deal with
              discipline problems - it is a
              > constant battle to find what works for you and the situation you
              are dealing with at that
              > particular moment. I've tried: having each table earning points and
              treats (when you could
              > give treats) to those kids who were fantastic, in hopes that those
              who were problems
              > would want to improve their behavior and earn a treat, Art reports,
              time out, changing
              > seats... The most important thing to do, no matter what you choose,
              is to document the
              > behavior and the action you took to resolve the problem. This
              covers you, most
              > importantly, so if you get asked about it by a parent or
              administrator, or if the classroom
              > teacher needs the reinforcement from other teachers, you have it.
              > What I'm using is a behavior log for the student to fill out and a
              form that I have on my
              > computer that I fill in and email it to their teacher. This way the
              teacher has
              > documentation that they can use for reinforcement in their
              classroom - and it shows the
              > actions taken in your room. Also, if you give grades this will back
              you up as well.
              >
              > The behavior log just has the date, the child's name,
              teacher/grade, and the behavior. The
              > Word document I have for my behavior form (I leave it on my
              desktop) lists Student name,
              > teacher/grade, and a space for behavior. Below that I've listed for
              checking off -Action
              > Taken: st. signed the behavior log, st. stood in time out, st.
              wrote___ sentences, st. was
              > sent to the office with a discipline referral, st. was moved to
              another table, Other_____.
              >
              > I've also added a sheet that goes along with our IB attitudes and
              profiles. It asks the
              > students what they did, what attitude they should have used to
              resolve that situation, and
              > how they can prevent the situation from happening again. This paper
              goes back with the
              > student. I do not have a copy of that here but I can email it to
              you if you need it.
              >
              > I hope this helps you! It is all a work in progress, constantly
              changing, so hang in there
              > and keep enjoying what you are doing!!
              >
              > Linda
              >
              > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "cinzing" <cinzing@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi, I am a new art teacher (elementary K-5), and I need
              > > help/suggestions for consequences for rule breaking. I have a
              reward
              > > system for class behavior and reward individual students for good
              > > behavior, but I can't seem to master giving appropriate
              consequences
              > > for individual bad behavior. I have taken away painting time,
              moved
              > > students to the edge of the room, changed seats, etc. But, this
              is
              > > not getting through to some students. It's so hard when you only
              see
              > > them for 40m then don't see them for a week.
              > >
              > > Do you have something that works well for you? Please share!
              > >
              > > Do you have any sample parent contact forms to fill out quickly to
              > > send with the student? Also, do you have any contract-type forms
              that
              > > you use where the student has to write about their rule-breaking?
              > >
              > > Thanks so much!
              > > Cindy Ingram
              > > Dallas ISD
              > > cinzing@
              > >
              >
            • Grace LaForge
              Hi Wanda, I empathize with you...8-9th graders are challenging in themselves without discipline problems. I teach Art in a residential treatment center -
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 5, 2008
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                Hi Wanda,
                 
                I empathize with you...8-9th graders are challenging in themselves without discipline problems.  I teach Art in a residential treatment center - middle school and high school boys who are mandated to be here due to their behaviors in school.
                 
                If it's any comfort, there are probably lots of kids in public schools who would benefit from an intensive setting where they and their families can receive therapy and support.  So, just know that it's not you, but a system which cannot provide enough for all kids.  With budgets becoming increasingly constrained, I see the situation will get much worse when districts can no longer afford specialized care.
                 
                From my experience, I usually get some "buy-in" to the art program by:
                 
                    Finding out more about the student through conversations with them.  When kids know we are genuinely interested in them, that we see something good in them, they risk opening up.
                 
                    Making art is taking a big risk!  Most kids will find something to connect to in Art - if they are sure they can be successful.  Be flexible and plan an alternative, less complex project for these students,  where they can receive at least a passing grade if they comply.  (Read between the lines when students say they don't care about learning)
                 
                    In general, Detentions which don't engage you and the student tend to build walls rather than bridges.
                 
                Projects my 8-9th graders love are ones where they learn a skill which unlocks the "secrets" of representational art like:
                1 and 2-point perspective, using shading and highlight to create the illusion of form, color mixing.
                I've taken cues from them, used 3' long graffiti lettering for a "Wall of Fame", projects using their names and lettering styles, architecture of the past, present and future and self-portraits and t-shirt designs.
                 
                Also - if you consult with your fellow teachers and administrators - try to find someone who knows these kids and may have some insight. 
                 
                I hope this helps a little -
                 
                Grace
              • Ken
                Question- Are the students who are stuck in art in the same class? If so, what percentage of those really want to be there? Ken
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 5, 2008
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                  Question- Are the students who are "stuck" in art in the same class?
                  If so, what percentage of those really want to be there?

                  Ken

                  --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "wanda smith" <wsmith72104@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > I just want to vent for a minute on the subject of discipline. Most
                  > of my discipline problems come from the students who do not choose
                  > art as an elective but are "stuck" in art because we don't have study
                  > hall. I teach 8th and 9th grades, calling parents helps with the 8th
                  > graders unfortunately many times the parents of the 9th graders break
                  > down and start sobbing or agreeing because they can't control them
                  > either. We do have noon detention and Saturday school so I use them
                  > when needed. Another problem is those students don't care if
                  > they "learn" the correct way to use art supplies or don't improve on
                  > their skills. Just my venting on this rainy Saturday, but at least
                  > it is cool. Wanda
                • aaroy85
                  I m in my second year now so I know the frustration involved in disciplining and behavior consequences. Honestly, I didn t stay consistent with a specific
                  Message 8 of 9 , Oct 12, 2008
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                    I'm in my second year now so I know the frustration involved in
                    disciplining and behavior consequences. Honestly, I didn't stay
                    consistent with a specific plan however, I did find that calling the
                    parents after a rough day helped an enormous amount. My principal
                    really encouraged us to stay in contact with the parents for issues
                    like this.

                    If parents are supportive on their part I found that I had immediate
                    results and the student really improved in their behavior the next week.

                    For me it was all about trial and error, some of my fellow art
                    educators have come up with a consequence chart all mapped out. That
                    may benefit you and the students so they can look at the chart and see
                    what consequence is going to happen if they still choose to act out.
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