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Re: Respect from teachers: Art on a cart?

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  • Marianna
    - Whenever possible see if you can hold art class in a different room than a teacher s classroom. I ve worked in the school library, the gym, and the
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 24, 2008
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      "Whenever possible see if you can hold art class in a different room
      than a teacher's classroom. I've worked in the school library, the
      gym, and the lunchroom. Each one had it's (big) challenges, but it
      was worth it not to have to run into another classroom teacher."

      I totally agree. After my experience on a cart and then at my next
      school the threat of going on a cart again-- I did everything
      possible to get another "space" before surrendering to a cart. I
      wrote a letter to my superintendent begging for part of our lunchroom
      ( we call commonsroom)I wrote all the pros of having a real space and
      all the cons of not. I asked for temporary walls and I knew there
      were going to be inconviences, but having my own space was much more
      greater than anything else. I got the lunch room and I have been
      there for the last 6 or 7 years. Since then, multiple principals have
      tried to get me in a real room ( as much as I would love to have
      one), I couldn't bear being pushed out again- so I have refused each
      time. I'll take pictures of my room some time and share with them
      here some time. I may have no ceiling or door-- but other than that--
      it's home. :)







      -- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Rivka Kehaty <rivkakehaty@...>
      wrote:
      >
      >
      >  
      > Oh, those stories of sharing a classroom and *groan* the wet
      sculptures in the trash bag...!  I had a year's worth of
      incredible art all thrown away by a principal after a student art
      exhibit, so I share your pain.
      >  
      > Some suggestions for new art on a cart-ers:
      >  
      > Whenever possible see if you can hold art class in a different room
      than a teacher's classroom.  I've worked in the school library, the
      gym, and the lunchroom.  Each one had it's (big) challenges, but it
      was worth it not to have to run into another classroom teacher.
      >  
      > Ask about, at least, *some!* storage somewhere in school.  I used a
      school kitchen cabinet for 3 years.  It was out of the way of
      people "needing" to use my scissors or supplies.  Last year I was
      given empty metal file cabinets.  Again, someone would have had to
      open drawers and dig around to finally find some supplies and so it
      just wasn't worth it.  I didn't lose anything this way. 
      >  
      > Never store supplies in someone's classroom!  (they will 'walk
      away')
      >  
      > When I did have to hold art class in someone's classroom for the
      year, I would be very respectful of the teacher and her room.  I let
      them know I recognized it was their territory.  I started clean up
      earlier, I had the kids sweep, wipe down their desks, etc.  How would
      we like it to walk into a classroom to find it a shambles, with
      pieces of paper, drips of water, paint spilled into a trash can,
      etc.  all over.  So I tried to keep that in mind when dealing with
      the teacher.
      >  
      > I would respectfully ask the teacher, "Would you mind if I kept a
      table up in the corner to keep their drying artwork?"   There are
      sturdy folding tables half the width of regular folding tables you
      could use and they would take up less room space.
      >  
      > Be prepared on what your response will be when you will invariably
      be asked to "do something creative with the students, because I can't
      even draw a straight line..." by the teacher.  You may be asked to do
      art during her/his class time, make a bulletin board, help them with
      classroom projects, etc.  You may want to do that, but then
      again,  you may not want to.  Rather than be caught off guard, decide
      ahead of time how you might answer these questions.  One note, just
      because you share a room does not require you to do something for
      this- I am sure- well-meaning teacher.   A brand, new art teacher
      might feel intimidated by the experienced classroom teacher, but keep
      in mind the "yeses" you say all take much more (probably unpaid) time
      than you would imagine.
      >  
      > It takes a tremendous amount of time, planning and organization to
      teach from a cart.  
      > good luck!
      > Rivka
      >
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