Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Interactive White Board

Expand Messages
  • joh777joh
    Linda, For those of us in schools that have the Smart Board but only in regular classes, could you compile a list of ways you use them that we can share with
    Message 1 of 15 , Jul 28, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Linda,
      For those of us in schools that have the "Smart Board" but only in
      regular classes, could you compile a list of ways you use them that
      we can share with our principals? Maybe that will help some of us
      get one that don't have a lot of hope of getting one right now. If
      we can show that other art teachers are using them and how, that
      would be great!

      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Molliy" <MAKEART96@...> wrote:
      >
      > -Awe--- you are all so lucky! My school is starting to get
      the "smart
      > Board" as they are calling them. But they will only go to
      > the "regular classroom teachers" first. Us Arts folks are not even
      on
      > the list and doubt we ever will be.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > -- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "linda" <lindwood@> wrote:
      > >
      > > This active board software is huge. The creative potential is
      > > wonderful. I wonder how many of us in this group have white
      boards
      > > now. I would really like to have a discussion as a group on the
      > > creative ways you are using yours. I know I can open art images
      and
      > > draw on them with white board software to make a point during a
      > > presentation. I experimented this morning and converted one of my
      > > Powerpoints into a flip chart. The real potential of this
      software
      > is
      > > what the kids can do on it as we involve them in a lesson. We can
      > > have them come up to the board to show a path of eye movement, or
      > > explain the balance of an artwork, or circle the point of
      emphasis,
      > > etc. ALso, they could use the camera tool (I'm about to figure
      this
      > > our more today) to cut and paste from each other's images that I
      > would
      > > photograph and have ready for them) and create a collage. Or I
      > could
      > > photograph a lot of textured papers, patterned papers, etc. and
      let
      > > them collage with shapes they make from those. The individually
      > drawn
      > > pen and ink mandalas that they were making on their own were more
      > > beautiful than the whiteboard mandala for sure, but the idea of
      the
      > > whole class making one mandala was pretty cool to all of them. I
      > > started out to make it like a team thing with one team making a
      > > design, then the other team took a turn, all watched and waited
      for
      > > their turn, but that was boring because it took too long. This
      way,
      > > they can be making their own mandalas and then just take turns
      > coming
      > > up and adding to the class mandala during the same studio
      period. I
      > > used a photograph of light pencil drawn concentric circles as the
      > > starting flipchart. I had that saved as a blank in clase if they
      > > really screwed it up and needed to start over. It saved some
      time
      > to
      > > have that ready. Or you could have all but two concentric
      circles
      > on
      > > the flip chart, demonstrate the next to the last one, and let a
      kid
      > > finish the last concentric circle. Then you could demonstrate
      you
      > to
      > > use the protractor and connect the protractor dots with the
      straight
      > > line tool. A kid could finish making the remaining protractor
      > > divisions, and then you could begin the class mandala design
      > process.
      > >
      > > So, how many of us have whiteboards? How many would like to have
      > this
      > > discussion and share ideas? You could email me off list and I
      could
      > > compile a list of who is interested in this discussion.
      > >
      > > Linda in Houston
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Amy Broady" <abroady@>
      wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hello Linda,
      > > >
      > > > Your post (via Ken--thank you, Ken!) got my attention. :-) Your
      > > > interactive mandala unit sounds intriguing...I'd like to give
      > that a
      > > > try!
      > > >
      > > > I, too, will be teaching with an interactive white board this
      > year!
      > > > It was installed this past spring, and I've used it so far
      mostly
      > as
      > > > a presentation tool to show web sites, document/display class
      > > > brainstorming session, and utlize a few PowerPoints (just
      having
      > an
      > > > LCD projector was new for me!).
      > > >
      > > > I signed up for an ActivBoard workshop over the summer, and was
      > > > really looking forward to it, but I ended up having to cancel
      due
      > to
      > > > a family event. So I have not yet had any training in how to
      > utilize
      > > > the interactive components, but the interactive features are
      what
      > > > will make this tool most powerful. Hence, I am eager to learn
      and
      > > > share ideas with other art educators, particularly
      > > > elementary/intermediate (I teach grades 3-5).
      > > >
      > > > I am so excited about the possibilities. Email me off list, and
      > maybe
      > > > we can start an idea/resource exchange.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Amy in TN
      > > > abroady@
      > > >
      > >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.