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Re: Problems with class demonstrations

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  • Marcia
    For classes with problems focusing, the way I do it is I have a large table and I get the whole class quiet and call up kids one at a time. I tell them to take
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 11, 2008
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      For classes with problems focusing, the way I do it is I have a large
      table and I get the whole class quiet and call up kids one at a time.
      I tell them to take their chair with them and then I point to where
      they are to sit around the table (separating the distractable
      students). Then, after half the class is seated around the table, I
      call up the rest of the students one at a time and they are to stand
      behind the seated kids. This is the best way to do it in my opinion.
      Going slowly and controlled is a way to ensure that everyone can see
      and there isn't squabbles over where to stand or sit. It may take a
      little longer to get them to line up, but there aren't as many hassles
      with a mad dash to the demo table. Then, when I am demonstrating and
      it is a chatty class I will employ my discipline system (name on
      board, then sit in hallway for time out, then next step which is "the
      bench"-- our school's discipline policy) if they are talking to their
      neighbor or making unrelated comments. Sometimes I allow them to ask
      questions without raising their hand (bc it is more casual) but if it
      is a more rowdy class I tell them to stay silent and I'll answer
      questions at the end with raised hands. I would not start a
      demonstration unless every single kid was at the table and paying
      attention. If they are wandering away, then they should sit next to
      you. Also, once students get "in the zone" with making art, they
      probably don't want to be interrupted for a demonstration, so I would
      only do a demo at the beginning or when absolutely necessary. And in
      that case, make sure you have everyone's complete attention before
      starting.

      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Joe Cox <jcox0008@...> wrote:
      >
      > I teach high school art and ceramic and I have a question on what is
      the best way to demonstrate a new technique to a class. My main mode
      of demonstrating is to have the students gather around at my table at
      the front of the room and watch me demonstrate, say, a painting
      technique. By doing it this way I know that they can see what I am
      doing but I always get complaints or a group will hang around in
      back and not come up at all to watch the demonstration. I try to keep
      the demo short but for some of my students getting out of their seat
      and standing for a short 5 minute demonstration is sheer torture. So
      I am wondering if there is a better way?
      >
      > Plus we are going from a 80 minute class every other day to a 45
      minute class everyday and time is going to be a real issue. Though
      minutes wasted getting everyone up to the demonstration table, quited
      and focused can be a real issue when time is so limited. So if you
      have any suggestions on how to demonstrate to a class please send
      them. I would really appreciate it.
      >
      > Blessings,
      > Joe
      >
    • Susan Brown
      One thing I have done in the past is to actually give them a quiz right after the demonstration. My students also keep notebooks or sketchbooks, sometimes I
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 11, 2008
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        One thing I have done in the past is to actually give them a quiz right after the demonstration. My students also keep notebooks or sketchbooks, sometimes I have them draw a flow chart or draw a digram that demonstrates their understanding of the technique being explored. They can't use materials until the chosen assessment is completed successfully. I check both that day to give them immediate feed back. Sending home grade checks with missing work listed also helps them with accountability issues. Phone calls home also help. Many teachers (myself include) avoid this useful technique.
      • loveylemmon
        Tricia, I like that idea. I also know a teacher who created videos of her foods demos. Another idea I had was using a drawing tablet and Painter software with
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 13, 2008
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          Tricia,

          I like that idea. I also know a teacher who created videos of her
          foods demos.

          Another idea I had was using a drawing tablet and Painter software
          with a prjector. I have that through our school. I've thought of doing
          this, but my tablet is pricey. That's my only real concern.

          Thanks for the idea about the document camera. we actually have
          projectors and whiteboards now. - I absolutely cannot believe we got a
          province wide grant for these.... I'll see if I can get my little
          digital to do that... ;)

          Kylie
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