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Interviewing tips? / Sagely wisdom?

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  • Joyce Rainwalker
    ... Jeff s ideas are right on, and to those I would add: Assume that the interview begins as soon as you hit the door. Interactions with staff and students in
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 4, 2008
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      > 3a. Interviewing Tips?/ Sagely Wisdom?
      > Posted by: "Kate" cape_kate_light@... cape_kate_light
      > Date: Thu Jul 3, 2008 4:57 pm ((PDT))
      >
      > I'm about to interview for an elementary art teaching job and feel confident about myself...
      > however I'm always looking to improve... does anyone have interviewing tips? Once I secure
      > my job I would be interested in any sagely wisdom. Thank you so much!!!!
      >
      >
      >
      > Messages in this topic (2)
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > 3b. Re: Interviewing Tips?/ Sagely Wisdom?
      > Posted by: "Jeff Pridie" jeffpridie@... jeffpridie
      > Date: Thu Jul 3, 2008 7:00 pm ((PDT))
      >
      > Is this your first job?
      >
      > Go online and see if the school has a website. If they do see if they have any Elementary Art displayed on the site or information about the school program. This will give you and idea of what you are walking into.
      >
      > The key to the interview is not just how you answer the questions but the kind of questions you might ask (How is the Elementary Art program viewed in the community? If you could add something new to your Elementary Art program what would it be? Don't be afraid to ask about budgets, class schedules, number of students, extra duties?
      >
      > Listen to the question you are asked, pause formulate your answer and do not go on an on with your answer.
      >
      > Eye contact.
      >
      > Thank them for the opportunity to interview with them. Ask about when the decision for the position will be made.
      >
      > Smile.
      >
      > If you have a portfolio of projects you have done, lesson plan, art philosophy, discipline outline.....photos, photos, photos.
      >
      > I have done a lot of interviewing for art positions for our district and the sinker for the interview are: lack of confidence, no questions for the interview team, no direct eye contact, poorly dressed, going on and on answering questions.
      >
      > Good luck on your interviewing
      >
      > Jeff (Minnesota)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >> Subject: [art_education] Interviewing Tips?/ Sagely Wisdom?
      >> To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
      >> Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 6:57 PM
      >> I'm about to interview for an elementary art teaching
      >> job and feel confident about myself...
      >> however I'm always looking to improve... does anyone
      >> have interviewing tips? Once I secure
      >> my job I would be interested in any sagely wisdom. Thank
      >> you so much!!!!
      >>
      Jeff's ideas are right on, and to those I would add:

      Assume that the interview begins as soon as you hit the door.
      Interactions with staff and students in the office might be important
      later, (in a close race), and a fifteen minute time period where you're
      exposed to office traffic might be intentionally scheduled so that your
      comfort level and manner outside a formal setting can be observed.

      Know what makes the school unique and find out as much as possible about
      what kinds of special programs they use. It will matter when questions
      about integrating art into the content areas arise.

      Listen carefully to questions as they're presented to you. It's easy to
      get slightly off track and answer something that's close while missing
      the core of the question completely. Many of us use "look for" lists to
      make note taking easier and tick off what we hear that fits the search.

      Have two parts of your presentation (and this is a presentation - you
      control some of it and they control some of it...) nearly memorized.
      For whatever form of "Tell us a little about yourself - your education
      and your experience" comes to you, have a couple of minutes of pertinent
      detail to share. You want to showcase your history with an eye towards
      relevant experience to the position you're interviewing for as well as
      the kind of life experience that makes you a rich and interesting
      addition to the school's cast of educators. The second piece to have
      "down" is the set of questions at the end ("Is there anything we can
      answer for you - or anything you want us to know about you that we
      didn't ask?") which are crucial. It's wise to print out a list. You
      don't have to ask every question, but if there's any part of the
      interview you want to strengthen, this is the place to do it. Remember,
      too, that you're interviewing the team. Ask probing but well placed
      questions that provide answers to your questions about whether you'll
      enjoy collaborating with these people and working towards their goals.

      Amazingly, I've sat through many interviews where the subject of
      children doesn't come up. In the little script in your head that you
      hear during the conversation with the team, make sure you focus on why
      you're in the profession. "I have always loved kids" is less effective
      than "I love the kinds of interactions I get with kids when I ____" or
      "One lesson that really surprised me in the way these children reacted
      was___"

      Confidence and rapport are lovely things, and you'll "click" better with
      some committees than others. That's just the way the system works.
      There's also a huge difference in the affect levels of some search
      processes, based on the kinds of people who are involved. If your
      certification program doesn't provide seminars with practice on
      answering questions and framing responses, ask for them. It's also a
      good idea to collect questions from each interview (jot them down in the
      car as you're leaving if you didn't get a sheet of questions) and review
      them occasionally for how your responses change over time.

      As much as possible, enjoy the process, and get into the habit of
      sending a thank you note to every committee. You may have a chance to
      interview with them again sometime and demonstrating good manners would
      please your mother.

      Joyce (whose admin in her veins is slowly being replaced by tempera and
      watercolor...)
      --
      K-5 Art Specialist
      http://EvergreenArt.Birdsong.ORG
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