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regarding K-6 priorities

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  • beyondskyline
    A teacher I work with complains that her students can t draw . She says, like THESE students...,like they have 2 heads. I told her I would give them the
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 5, 2008
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      A teacher I work with complains that her students "can't draw". She
      says, like "THESE" students...,like they have 2 heads. I told her I
      would give them the experience to draw, that I could not demand they
      draw the head in a certain way, etc. When I worked with the class, they
      refused to draw with one crayon. They jumped from one color to the
      next, without much sensitivity, in my opinion. The teacher came back to
      class, and she made a face when she looked at the work, and then had
      another visceral reaction when I recommended that they concentrate on
      line, not color. I'm finding her intolerable, and I was wondering if
      anyone out there has worked with these issues, and personnel, before.

      S
    • Ken
      I assume you are talking about a regular elementary classroom teacher coming into the room. These teachers have no art training and want their children to draw
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 6, 2008
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        I assume you are talking about a regular elementary classroom teacher
        coming into the room. These teachers have no art training and want
        their children to draw "pretty" pictures. Of course, anything creative
        or not done realistically is not "pretty." On Valentines Day they have
        their students do lots of hearts, on St. Patrick's Day they do lots of
        shamrocks, and on Christmas they do lots of holly. These are the same
        teachers that ask you to put aside your art lessons and have their
        students do "pretty" heart cards or the like for their classroom
        Valentines parties. What I did was ignore them. I was nice- but I
        ignored their comments because I knew they had no clue what art is.

        Ken Rohrer

        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "beyondskyline"
        <beyondskyline@...> wrote:
        >
        > A teacher I work with complains that her students "can't draw". She
        > says, like "THESE" students...,like they have 2 heads. I told her I
        > would give them the experience to draw, that I could not demand they
        > draw the head in a certain way, etc. When I worked with the class, they
        > refused to draw with one crayon. They jumped from one color to the
        > next, without much sensitivity, in my opinion. The teacher came back to
        > class, and she made a face when she looked at the work, and then had
        > another visceral reaction when I recommended that they concentrate on
        > line, not color. I'm finding her intolerable, and I was wondering if
        > anyone out there has worked with these issues, and personnel, before.
        >
        > S
        >
      • Julie Casebourn
        S... When I first started teaching at my current school, a few teachers had requests and expectations that I wasn t willing to cooperate with because the
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 6, 2008
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          S...
              When I first started teaching at my current school, a few teachers had requests and expectations that I wasn't willing to cooperate with because the objectives were not jiving with mine as the art teacher.  Attitudes have changed somewhat over the years with my colleagues and they are more tolerant and of work that is "outside the box" .. at least the work coming from the art room, if not in their own rooms.   But.. I have never had a teacher respond as you described to work I led the students through.  It's discouraging to be on the receiving end of that, especially when you went out of your way to help.  I agree with Ken.. politely ignore future requests for help from this teacher and shake it off.   


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        • Katherine
          ... I have found that most elementary staff have little or no training in child development, as relates to drawing. The work of Viktor Lowenfeld, Rhoda
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 6, 2008
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            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "beyondskyline"
            <beyondskyline@...> wrote:
            >
            > A teacher I work with complains that her students "can't draw".

            I have found that most elementary staff have little or no training in
            child development, as relates to drawing. The work of Viktor
            Lowenfeld, Rhoda Kellogg and Betty Lark-Horowitz seems to be largely
            ignored in teacher training now. I believe that art education programs
            must be giving this essential information short shrift also, as
            evidenced by the enormous amount of art teaching that is not attuned
            to child development. Howard Gardner of Multiple Intelligences fame
            also got his publishing start (ARTFUL SCRIBBLES) studying the
            'unschooled art' of children. You can Google any of the above people
            for good references.

            As a first step with your colleague, go to Craig Roland's great
            Internet content and print it out to share with her and others:

            http://www.artjunction.org/young.php

            Then, Marvin Bartel has a Beyond Wonderful website on learning and
            teaching and drawing with young children. It is both useful and
            inspiring.

            http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html

            Good luck to you. What you find and share with others is so important
            to your young students!

            kathy douglas
            K-3 Massachusetts, retired
            Teaching for Artistic Behavior
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/
          • marcia
            I would probably explain to her that kids are at varying stages of drawing realistically and you can t expect everyone to draw wonderfully, just as you would
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 6, 2008
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              I would probably explain to her that kids are at
              varying stages of drawing realistically and you can't
              expect everyone to draw wonderfully, just as you would
              not expect every child to be able to do a perfect
              layup in basketball. One or two drawing lessons is
              not going to make a child draw incredibly
              realistically. I would recommend starting with pen or
              pencil, rather than crayon. Do demonstrations, have
              handouts, a good exercise would also be to draw still
              lifes or draw other classmates. Also she needs to
              have a positive attitude and explain what she expects
              in the drawings before hand. If she merely criticizes
              the child after the fact they will get discouraged.
              Some kids will just draw stick figures unless you
              explain to them that you want your person to have
              bones and skin, you want to see the clothes they are
              wearing, the pupil of the eye, the eyebrows, and so
              forth.




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