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Re:Re Elmo

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  • Linda
    By the way, the Elmo is connected to the LCD projector. It does not use batteries, but does have a lightbulb that is about 25.00 to replace. I ve used my
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2008
      By the way, the Elmo is connected to the LCD projector.  It does not use batteries, but does have a lightbulb that is about 25.00 to replace.  I've used my Elmo two years and have not had to replace the lightbulb.  I just wheel the projector cart up next to my desk, aim it at the screen, pull the Elmo off of the cart onto my desk, and voila...showtime.  I can see how a movie camera in live action projected through your projector would allow you more flexibility than the Elmo as far as how wide an area you could have in your demonstration.  So far, I have not been inhibited by the small size.  I just make my sample demonstrations 9x12 or 12x18 max and I am ok. 
      Linda


      Linda
    • Hillmer, Jan
      What brands of Elmos are being discussed? I have seen one at our school but it has a delay which I find annoying to watch. I d like to know what brands have
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2008

        What brands of Elmos are being discussed? 

        I have seen one at our school but it has a delay which I find annoying to watch.  I’d like to know what brands have little or no delay and are reliable.

         

        Jan in Tampa

         

        I have an Elmo and love it.  I have the screen behind me and just focus on my lesson under the camera. 

      • Linda
        I do not offhand know the model number of my Elmo. Mine does have a slight delay. I do not look at the screen when I use it, except to check for location
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 2, 2008
          I do not offhand know the model number of my Elmo.  Mine does have a slight delay.  I do not look at the screen when I use it, except to check for location under the camera, focus, etc.  I just trust that the picture of my demo is happening and have asked the kids to let me know if I ever go out of range.  I do not miss looking at the screen while I am working at all, and actually think even if there was NOT a slight delay, looking at the screen while I am demonstrating would be distracting to me.  The bottom line is that the kids see the action fine, it's not jumpy or skippy.  You can also adjust the view for a closeup, and you can adjust the lens for the existing light.  I know we spent close to 900.00 on ours.  A video camera is less expensive.  However, I don't have to tiptoe around a tripod or worry about kids tipping over a tripod and camera.  How do those of you who use a video cam for demos handle the tripod issues? 


          Linda
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