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Re: [art_education] Origami help!

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  • James and Monica Gabehart
    I have used a simple origami head shape with my first graders - fold in half diagonally to get a triangle, then fold corners up for a pig, cat, fox, raccoon,
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 29, 2007
      I have used a simple origami head shape with my first graders - fold in half
      diagonally to get a triangle, then fold corners up for a pig, cat, fox,
      raccoon, armadillo, etc or fold corners down for a dog, glue the head to a
      background and draw on a body and background. Another simple thing is a
      basic kite shape and fold the sides in once more for a skinnyg kite and make
      6-8 per child and arrnage them ina fan shape on a piece of construction
      paper.
      Monica
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "sarah" <willow_starmoon@...>
      To: <art_education@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, October 27, 2007 6:11 PM
      Subject: [art_education] Origami help!


      > Hi there my name is Sarah and I'm currently student teaching at a K-5
      > school. I'm getting ready to start a unit on Japan next week, and
      > would like to incorporate origami into my lessons for week 3, but I'm
      > unsure of what the kids can handle. I've got the 4th and 5th graders
      > making cranes, and the 2nd and 3rd graders making samurai hats. My
      > problem is what to do with K and 1. The class is only 40 minutes long
      > and my students have A LOT of trouble following directions. Any ideas
      > out there for something I can do? I've seen some simple origami
      > pieces, but I don't know if they can handle it....I don't want them to
      > get too frustrated. Kindergarten might be able to because the classes
      > are small, but my 1st grade classes have about 30 (somewhat
      > rambunctious)students. Anyone have experience with students this age
      > completing origami? Thanks in advance for the help. (^_^)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • Kidlfrndly@aol.com
      Dear Sarah, I taught Japanese and Chinese lessons pretty much all last year, as it was my art show theme. Since I am not very good with Origami myself, I
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 30, 2007
        Dear Sarah,
         
             I taught Japanese and Chinese lessons pretty much all last year, as it was my art show theme. Since I am not very good with Origami myself, I didn't get very far into it, but I will tell you that my third graders made those little origami dolls on the wooden ice cream spoons ( like $2.99 a bag of 60 in the craft store) I precut both origami paper and colored Kraft paper for the body and arm pieces, black construction paper for the hair, and used the prettiest small patterend origami paper I had for the obis. They were quite darling when they were finished, and we displayed them in the hallway on a real borrowed kimono.  The younger kids can make the hanging Carp banners ( I can't think of the correct Japanese name for them right now) and we did fish printing, which is always a favorite. For the first graders, I cut watercolor paper into some long panels and showed them some samples of Japanese Plum blossom paintings and taught them how to paint a simple plum blossom in watercolor. The children just painted a simple branch, and I told them that the white space was just as important as the painted areas. I had read somewhere that the plum blossom signifies strength to the Japanese, since they are the first flower that blooms, often in the the snow. The Japanese parents want their children to be strong, like the plum blossom. After the paintings were finished, I had a station with some soft toothbrushes I got from the nurse, and some watered- down white tempera, which they spattered over the flowers (once they were dry) so that they looked snowy, like some of the paintings we had looked at in class. They actually looked a lot better than this sounds- especially matted on longer black panels. Soon everyone wanted to try it, and the plum blossom became the design for our art show invitation and program. I found some really nice examples of plum blossoms  in a Chinese watercolor book, as well. I can't remember the title offhand, because it's at school, but it's a small thick book with separate booklets inside, as well as a black ink stick, brush and painting supplies. Definitely check out "Art from Many Hands" for multicultural ideas if you haven't already!
        Hope this helps!
        Lisa




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