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Re: [art_education] Re: Old powdered tempera

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  • Julie Casebourn
    I have used powdered tempra to create what I ll call... the poor man s marbleized paper... hahaha.. or the frugal art teacher s marbleized paper??? Of course
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 1, 2007
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      I have used powdered tempra to create what I'll call... the poor man's marbleized paper... hahaha.. or the frugal art teacher's marbleized paper??? Of course if you google marbliezed paper you will get some great info. and many different methods on how to do it.. some expensive and some using just what you have in your kitchen or classroom. 
       
      Since you have an abundance of the powdered tempra you can prepare the bin or tub of water by adding a few drop of liquid dish soap and whisk it in and let the air bubbles settle.  Sprinkle different colors of the tempra powder gently on top of the surface of the water and stir gently with a hair pick, stick, feather.. the point is to swirl the colors into interesting patterns without mixing the colors into a muddy mess or sink them.  The powdered paint should float.  Quickly/gently drop a level white sheet of paper onto the surface and peel off quickly.  Voila!!  
       
      I saw this done with colored chalk shavings at an art ed. conference and thought that I could use the powdered tempra I too, had inherited.  Just make sure the tempra is finely ground up.. have a few flour sifters on hand... works like a charm.
      Julie


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    • Julie Casebourn
      By the way, Dick Blick has an awesome and very, very cheap lesson on marbleizing paper on their website under the 2006 lesson plans section. It doesn t use
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 1, 2007
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         By the way, Dick Blick has an awesome and very, very cheap lesson on marbleizing paper on their website under the 2006 lesson plans section.  It doesn't use powdered tempra paint, but it's worth a look.. and their recipe goes a looooong way with many classes. _


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      • Barbara Davis
        If you have a lot of powdered tempera you can do lawn paintings with it. My colleague has a great lesson plan that explains how the kids come to consensus on
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 2, 2007
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          If you have a lot of powdered tempera you can do "lawn paintings" with it.
          My colleague has a great lesson plan that explains how the kids come to
          consensus on the design, grid the design, and then mark grids with string
          and wooden stakes out on the school lawn. Kids use white sand or flour for
          white, new bags of top soil for black, and then mix, in large buckets, the
          powdered tempera with flour. The flour acts as an extender. Each student has
          to carefully sift/sprinkle the colrants within the square or squares they
          are assigned. Each has a color copy of the original gridded off to refer to.
          My colleagie has done this several times, and we even did it on the lawn of
          the hotel at the Florida Art Ed conference a few years ago as a part of a
          three-hour session. We have all the info on a CD and we are trying to get
          our tech folks caught up to put it on our school website. When we get it
          (and several other lessons from the CD) up on the website I'll send an emil
          to the list with the link.

          In the meantime, don't throw away the tempera. It is still usable for its
          original intent as well as other projects like lawn painting. At the very
          least, if you must get rid of it, pass it on to another teacher.

          Barbara
        • Terri Noell
          I mixed mine with beach sand and use it for all my students sand art/painting progects...works great! Terri k-5 Florida ...
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 2, 2007
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            I mixed mine with beach sand and use it for all my students' sand
            art/painting progects...works great!
            Terri
            k-5 Florida


            >From: "Vicki Kolden" <vickolden@...>
            >Reply-To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
            >To: <art_education@yahoogroups.com>
            >Subject: [art_education] Old powdered tempera
            >Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2007 23:16:42 -0500
            >
            >Hello Everyone!!!
            >
            >I have been working in my new Art classroom and feeling very thankful for
            >my new job. I am starting my 20th year as an art teacher and I feel like a
            >first year teacher again...It is a bigger school than I am used to....with
            >bigger classes than I am used to and I am a little nervous about it... No
            >more commuting...YES!!! and a dream art room. I am very thankful. I
            >have been working in my room and getting things ready for the 2007-2008
            >school year....I have a question. Someone has been cleaning out some old
            >art supplies from some storage closet shared with the custodians and some
            >other teachers and brought me several boxes of old...old...powdered tempera
            >paint...I really don't want to use it anymore...I am not sure but I think
            >some of it may have been here since 1971 when I was a seventh grader here.
            > he he he I would like to throw it but I was just wondering is there any
            >use for the stuff anymore??? I think the safety/osha people don't want
            >us to be using powdered stuff much anymore....Does anyone know...???
            >
            >thanks,
            >Vickie in Minnesota

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          • Paige Conn
            I look forward to the follow up information on the Lawn Painting! Paige ________________________________ From: art_education@yahoogroups.com on behalf of
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 4, 2007
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              I look forward to the follow up information on the Lawn Painting!

              Paige

              ________________________________

              From: art_education@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Barbara Davis
              Sent: Sun 9/2/2007 2:06 PM
              To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [art_education] Re:Old powdered tempera



              If you have a lot of powdered tempera you can do "lawn paintings" with it.
              My colleague has a great lesson plan that explains how the kids come to
              consensus on the design, grid the design, and then mark grids with string
              and wooden stakes out on the school lawn. Kids use white sand or flour for
              white, new bags of top soil for black, and then mix, in large buckets, the
              powdered tempera with flour. The flour acts as an extender. Each student has
              to carefully sift/sprinkle the colrants within the square or squares they
              are assigned. Each has a color copy of the original gridded off to refer to.
              My colleagie has done this several times, and we even did it on the lawn of
              the hotel at the Florida Art Ed conference a few years ago as a part of a
              three-hour session. We have all the info on a CD and we are trying to get
              our tech folks caught up to put it on our school website. When we get it
              (and several other lessons from the CD) up on the website I'll send an emil
              to the list with the link.

              In the meantime, don't throw away the tempera. It is still usable for its
              original intent as well as other projects like lawn painting. At the very
              least, if you must get rid of it, pass it on to another teacher.

              Barbara
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