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RE: [art_education] Air Dry Clay, Drying racks, Cork strips

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  • familyerickson
    Lowes has some very nice large metal shelving units with open weave and wheels that our school has been buying. They are $49. Also, I bought 2 large sheets
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 28, 2007
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      Lowes has some very nice large metal shelving units with open weave and wheels that our school has been buying.   They are $49. 
       
      Also, I bought 2 large sheets of peg board and had them cut into boards 4 x 8 inches.   These are a great size for elem. kids to put their clay project on and carry it to you.   The holes in the peg board help the projects to dry quicker.    Do not wash the boards or they will not last very long but you can wipe them down with a damp rag and airdry them and they will last for years and years. 
       
      IMHO a drying rack is the first thing I buy for my artroom.  They are worth every penny if you are trying to rotate a lot of classes thru and you want to do wet work like painting and collage.   
      Cindy
       
      -----Original Message-----
      From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of thepsychoartist
      Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2007 6:47 PM
      To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [art_education] Air Dry Clay, Drying racks, Cork strips

      Hi,
      I am in my first year of teaching art. I start school in two weeks,
      and I have a few questions.

      I am putting in a catalog order, and I was wondering if anyone has
      used Sargent Air Dry Clay. I am wondering if it works like other air
      dry clay. It is more economially priced. The teacher before me used
      Model Magic, which I do not feel is very much like clay. I looked it
      up, and there did not seem to be any reviews for the product. (I do
      not have a kiln - there is one at a different school in the district,
      but I do not know of the availability) .

      There is not a drying rack in my room at all. I was wondering if
      anyone knew what types of parts I might need to construct my own. A
      friend of mine has some wire grids that she is thinking about using.
      (Moveable or otherwise).

      There are not cork strips adorning my walls. I have cork tiles that I
      found in my parents basement, but I would want to cut them into like
      2" strips and then put them next to each other. I was wondering if
      anyone had any insight to where I could get either access to tools to
      help cut these. I would like to also get them placed on wood boards,
      and I was thinking about getting a ridge cut out, and then nailing
      these tiles to it.

      Please let me know if you have any suggestions!

      Teri
      Recently moved to Arizona

    • K Olson
      The bread racks are great! I have several that we got donated from a store and they are perfect for drying your projects. We also got some meat carts from
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 28, 2007
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        The bread racks are great!  I have several that we got donated from a store and they are perfect for drying your projects.  We also got some meat carts from Costco  that we can roll around and use for clay projects and for storing sketchbooks.  I don't know what I'd do without them.

        Ask at your local stores or the bakery distributors.

        Kathy O


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      • K Olson
        The bread racks are great! I have several that we got donated from a store and they are perfect for drying your projects. We also got some meat carts from
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 28, 2007
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          The bread racks are great!  I have several that we got donated from a store and they are perfect for drying your projects.  We also got some meat carts from Costco  that we can roll around and use for clay projects and for storing sketchbooks.  I don't know what I'd do without them.

          Ask at your local stores or the bakery distributors.

          For hanging artwork on walls and cabinits that do not have cork or bulletin board material, I use fun tac, the blue sticky stuff.  Holds things up all year without damage.

          Kathy O


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        • thepsychoartist
          Thanks everyone for all of your help so far. :-) I have also tried air dry clay when I went to National conference two years ago, and I also tried Crayola
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 29, 2007
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            Thanks everyone for all of your help so far. :-)

            I have also tried air dry clay when I went to National conference two
            years ago, and I also tried Crayola air dry clay and it did work
            nicely. The previous art teacher used Model Magic and flour/salt
            dough, and there are still supplies for flour/salt dough, but I would
            prefer giving these elementary students experiences with something
            closer to the consistancy of real clay, since they live in the
            Southwest, and it's such a vivid part of the history in the area (I
            feel it is a disservice not to). Right now there is only one kiln in
            the district and I do not know if I will have access to it (it is in a
            different school. I did use some other brands of air dry clay, and I
            remember one was really sticky, but I do not remember what company
            produced it. I was planning on finding a sample of this air dry clay
            before buying it in bulk.

            Teri in AZ

            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "metalgirl54300" <lloar@...> wrote:
            >
            > ***Teri, I tried creating a coil pot with Crayola's Air Dry clay when
            > I received samples in the mail and it worked similarily to stoneware
            > clay. It slipped and scored nicely and hasn't yet fallen apart,
            > unlike Amaco's Mexican and Marblex clays (brittle). You may want to
            > purchase a tub before ordering it in bulk. It's probably more $$ than
            > Sargent.
            >
            > Lauri
            >
            > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "thepsychoartist"
            > <summerskiter@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi,
            > > I am in my first year of teaching art. I start school in two weeks,
            > > and I have a few questions.
            > >
            > > I am putting in a catalog order, and I was wondering if anyone has
            > > used Sargent Air Dry Clay. I am wondering if it works like other air
            > > dry clay. It is more economially priced. The teacher before me used
            > > Model Magic, which I do not feel is very much like clay. I looked it
            > > up, and there did not seem to be any reviews for the product.
            > >
            > > Please let me know if you have any suggestions!
            > >
            > > Teri
            > > Recently moved to Arizona
            > >
            >
          • Nakarsha Bester
            Hi, I am in my 2nd year of teaching art and I still in trail and error mode but I will help as much as I can. Concerning the air dry clay: All air dry clay
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 30, 2007
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              Hi,
               
              I am in my 2nd year of teaching art and I still in trail and error mode but I will help as much as I can. 
               
              Concerning the air dry clay:  All air dry clay are different because of drying time.  Some dry faster then others but I have no information on the Sargent brand.  I do know if you search the internet and look for clay that can either go into an oven or can air dry at a rate that will be good for you class that may work.

              thepsychoartist <summerskiter@...> wrote:
              Hi,
              I am in my first year of teaching art. I start school in two weeks,
              and I have a few questions.

              I am putting in a catalog order, and I was wondering if anyone has
              used Sargent Air Dry Clay. I am wondering if it works like other air
              dry clay. It is more economially priced. The teacher before me used
              Model Magic, which I do not feel is very much like clay. I looked it
              up, and there did not seem to be any reviews for the product. (I do
              not have a kiln - there is one at a different school in the district,
              but I do not know of the availability) .

              There is not a drying rack in my room at all. I was wondering if
              anyone knew what types of parts I might need to construct my own. A
              friend of mine has some wire grids that she is thinking about using.
              (Moveable or otherwise).

              There are not cork strips adorning my walls. I have cork tiles that I
              found in my parents basement, but I would want to cut them into like
              2" strips and then put them next to each other. I was wondering if
              anyone had any insight to where I could get either access to tools to
              help cut these. I would like to also get them placed on wood boards,
              and I was thinking about getting a ridge cut out, and then nailing
              these tiles to it.

              Please let me know if you have any suggestions!

              Teri
              Recently moved to Arizona



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            • Patricia Jones Brigman
              I just ordered Crayola Air Dry clay for the 2 schools I will be teaching at this year. Yes, Marblex is awfully brittle and frustrating for elem. kids just
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 30, 2007
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                I just ordered Crayola Air Dry clay for the 2 schools I will be teaching at this year.  Yes, Marblex is awfully brittle and frustrating for elem. kids just learning.  Another teacher in my district tried the Crayola clay and loves it, so I'm going with her recommendation.   I like the fact that it's white since we'll be painting it.  Makes me think of the nice porcelain I used to throw with in college.
                 
                Patti
                 
                Patti Brigman
                Art Teacher
                Walker Elementary
                 

                -----Original Message-----
                From: "metalgirl54300" <lloar@...>
                To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2007 11:08:45 -0000
                Subject: [art_education] Re: Air Dry Clay, Drying racks, Cork strips

                ***Teri, I tried creating a coil pot with Crayola's Air Dry clay when
                I received samples in the mail and it worked similarily to stoneware
                clay. It slipped and scored nicely and hasn't yet fallen apart,
                unlike Amaco's Mexican and Marblex clays (brittle). You may want to
                purchase a tub before ordering it in bulk. It's probably more $$ than
                Sargent.

                Lauri

                --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, "thepsychoartist"
                <summerskiter@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi,
                > I am in my first year of teaching art. I start school in two weeks,
                > and I have a few questions.
                >
                > I am putting in a catalog order, and I was wondering if anyone has
                > used Sargent Air Dry Clay. I am wondering if it works like other air
                > dry clay. It is more economially priced. The teacher before me used
                > Model Magic, which I do not feel is very much like clay. I looked it
                > up, and there did not seem to be any reviews for the product.
                >
                > Please let me know if you have any suggestions!
                >
                > Teri
                > Recently moved to Arizona
                >

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              • Amy Broady
                I used some Crayola Air Dry Clay this spring not with a class but with my 3rd-grade daughter. We used it to sculpt heads, hands/arms, and feet for a pair of
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 30, 2007
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                  I used some Crayola Air Dry Clay this spring not with a class but
                  with my 3rd-grade daughter. We used it to sculpt heads, hands/arms,
                  and feet for a pair of Japanese-style dolls. Holes in each piece
                  allowed pipe cleaners to be used to build up the rest of the body,
                  which was covered by the kimonos we fashioned. Embroidery-floss hair
                  was added in the head-sculpting stage by making a tassle out of a
                  skein of floss, and building the head around the top of the tassle.
                  Plastic wrap held in place with rubber bands helped keep the length
                  of hair clean as we were sculpting. Eyes were little black beads.

                  The clay dried beautifully. I accidently snapped one of the arms. A
                  clean break; super glue fixed it, and it has stayed fixed.

                  The dolls turned out great, and my daughter is so proud of them. She
                  brings them lots of places, but takes special care of them.

                  I'd certainly consider using this particular air dry clay in the
                  classroom, though I am not sure how much to order per student, and
                  worry that cost might be prohibitive, since I have high numbers at
                  each of my grade levels.

                  Amy in TN
                  Elementary

                  P.S. The dolls were inspired by Rumer Godden's precious book
                  entitled "Miss Happiness and Miss Flower." The book actually contains
                  detailed instructions for building a Japanese-style doll's house in
                  addition to the beautiful story.
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