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Re: [art_education] DBAE and Redefining Curriculum (the teachers part)

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  • Jeff Pridie
    ... Learner Outcome, DBAE, Standards, the list goes on. Strategies to teach what we do. I guess the questions for all of us in Art Education is: How do I want
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 8, 2007
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      > Where do you stand with DBAE, guys? I took a class
      > taught by a
      > Teacher's College PhD, and he felt very negatively
      > about it. He
      > defined a "new" psychological approach that was
      > founded on a child's
      > everyday experience. The "motivation" would be class
      > dialogue that
      > brought up visual imagery for a child, say,
      > pertaining to a day in the
      > Fall. Stewart's book, on the other hand, is also
      > "new", but she states
      > that it's meant to augment DBAE. Any reaction?

      Learner Outcome, DBAE, Standards, the list goes on.
      Strategies to teach what we do. I guess the questions
      for all of us in Art Education is: How do I want to
      teach? How do I want my students to embrace Art?"

      Having worked with many student teachers over the
      years they come filled with strategies and ideas
      filling their heads from the College of Education/Art
      Education departments from their respective colleges
      and universities. They come with ideas but in the end
      they struggle with how to build a creative, thinking,
      explorative and productive learning environment.

      Interesting how when I sit down with the student
      teacher and process their own experience in their
      "elementary,middle school,high school" art classroom I
      get a sense sometimes of their foundation. We discuss
      how they were taught, what they came away with, what
      they wished they had learned and how they wished they
      would have learned it. In that discussion comes
      further foundation building. I explain to the student
      teacher to take all the theory and personal evaluation
      and mix that to determine how they want to teach. I
      advise student teachers to read, research and keep
      current with new developments in teaching strategies
      in order for them to keep teaching fresh. I caution
      them though in embracing all that comes down the line.

      The bottom line to all this is if we, the educator, do
      not have a sense of the "big idea" for what we do how
      can we empower our students to gain the "big idea" of
      Art.

      So if we have taught 3, 10, 20, 30 or more years what
      is the "big idea" for what you teach and how you
      teach? Are you walking away every school year
      learning, experiencing something new? Are your
      students?
      Is what you are doing a vocation or a just simply a
      job?

      Jeff (Minnesota)




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    • katday2001
      There are some really wonderful things being said, here (copied and pasted below). I understand Stewart and Walker s book (Rethinking Curriculum in Art) as a
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 9, 2007
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        There are some really wonderful things being said, here (copied and
        pasted below). I understand Stewart and Walker's book (Rethinking
        Curriculum in Art) as a means to enforce what we already know about
        the importance of teaching art. When we teach using only DBAE, I
        think students are hearing only techniques and art history, and what
        arts can teach you may be lost. With daily refocus on the questions
        you generate in discussions and classwork, students are more apt to
        retain this knowledge which, like any knowledge, must be repeated many
        times in different ways to be really learned and not just experienced
        and forgotten. You show, you discuss, they do, they reflect, you show
        and discuss again, for several weeks, even months, never losing site
        of the Big Idea (I, too, prefer Enduring Idea, but 'big' takes less
        time to type!). Some cool postings:

        "The best thing to do is keep abreast of everything every body is
        talking about and then decide which best fits to your teaching style
        and environment." (Patty)and "How best do we get kids to want to make
        art?"
        I'm going through a lot of work this summer to improve my teaching and
        feeling that students are leaving with something important, but it IS
        a lot of work, and not for everyone. My students don't have much
        access to the outside world, as we are 100 from anywhere, so I hope to
        use art classes to open up their world and make them think. I have so
        many taking the class because they don't want to take music, the only
        other art credit, and they don't much like art, but sit them down and
        have them do the work, get the grade, and move on. I want more for
        them. If you, the teacher, don't love a 'new' philosophy, you won't do
        it anyway, but keep an open mind and consider the possibilities.

        "The bottom line to all this is if we, the educator, do
        not have a sense of the "big idea" for what we do how
        can we empower our students to gain the "big idea" of
        Art." (Jeff)
        It's easy to get bogged down with finding new cool projects or
        important skills they should have by the end of the year, and lose
        site of why we make and study art at all. For me, making these units
        under the umbrella of the Big Idea makes official what I know about
        art's importance. It goes beyond the first day of class when I
        explain why students are required to take an art credit and reminds
        them every day that they are citizens of Earth with brains and art can
        help us work through and respond to our world (and comprehend how
        others have done so in the past).

        I have 5 units I'm working on so far, on themes like good & evil;
        sense of place; physical,emotional, and spiritual needs; social
        reality; and family ties. This is high school From these themes,
        I've generated key concepts and essential questions to ask throughout
        the unit and to guide me in choosing assignments.

        Now I'm off to read the rest of the posts and follow the suggested links!
        Kathleen
        The Edge of Missouri, Almost Kansas




        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "beyondskyline"
        <beyondskyline@...> wrote:
        >
        > Where do you stand with DBAE, guys? I took a class taught by a
        > Teacher's College PhD, and he felt very negatively about it. He
        > defined a "new" psychological approach that was founded on a child's
        > everyday experience. The "motivation" would be class dialogue that
        > brought up visual imagery for a child, say, pertaining to a day in the
        > Fall. Stewart's book, on the other hand, is also "new", but she states
        > that it's meant to augment DBAE. Any reaction?
        >
        > Thanks, I appreciate this topic, which began here,
        > Sharon, NJ
        >
      • Eileen Ciavarella
        Kathleen, I am writing curriculum for the first time (high school level) and I like what you ve said in your post. I also like the idea of using themes. Can
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 10, 2007
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          Kathleen,
          I am writing curriculum for the first time (high school level) and I like
          what you've said in your post. I also like the idea of using themes. Can you
          tell me some of the key concepts and essential questions you might ask for
          one of your units and how do you write curriculum so that it leaves room for
          bringing in new ideas or new assignments down the road?

          Eileen

          >From: "katday2001" <neato23@...>
          >Reply-To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          >To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [art_education] Re: DBAE and Redefining Curriculum (Stewart)
          >Date: Mon, 09 Jul 2007 13:23:56 -0000
          >
          >There are some really wonderful things being said, here (copied and
          >pasted below). I understand Stewart and Walker's book (Rethinking
          >Curriculum in Art) as a means to enforce what we already know about
          >the importance of teaching art. When we teach using only DBAE, I
          >think students are hearing only techniques and art history, and what
          >arts can teach you may be lost. With daily refocus on the questions
          >you generate in discussions and classwork, students are more apt to
          >retain this knowledge which, like any knowledge, must be repeated many
          >times in different ways to be really learned and not just experienced
          >and forgotten. You show, you discuss, they do, they reflect, you show
          >and discuss again, for several weeks, even months, never losing site
          >of the Big Idea (I, too, prefer Enduring Idea, but 'big' takes less
          >time to type!). Some cool postings:
          >
          >"The best thing to do is keep abreast of everything every body is
          >talking about and then decide which best fits to your teaching style
          >and environment." (Patty)and "How best do we get kids to want to make
          >art?"
          >I'm going through a lot of work this summer to improve my teaching and
          >feeling that students are leaving with something important, but it IS
          >a lot of work, and not for everyone. My students don't have much
          >access to the outside world, as we are 100 from anywhere, so I hope to
          > use art classes to open up their world and make them think. I have so
          >many taking the class because they don't want to take music, the only
          >other art credit, and they don't much like art, but sit them down and
          >have them do the work, get the grade, and move on. I want more for
          >them. If you, the teacher, don't love a 'new' philosophy, you won't do
          >it anyway, but keep an open mind and consider the possibilities.
          >
          >"The bottom line to all this is if we, the educator, do
          >not have a sense of the "big idea" for what we do how
          >can we empower our students to gain the "big idea" of
          >Art." (Jeff)
          >It's easy to get bogged down with finding new cool projects or
          >important skills they should have by the end of the year, and lose
          >site of why we make and study art at all. For me, making these units
          >under the umbrella of the Big Idea makes official what I know about
          >art's importance. It goes beyond the first day of class when I
          >explain why students are required to take an art credit and reminds
          >them every day that they are citizens of Earth with brains and art can
          >help us work through and respond to our world (and comprehend how
          >others have done so in the past).
          >
          >I have 5 units I'm working on so far, on themes like good & evil;
          >sense of place; physical,emotional, and spiritual needs; social
          >reality; and family ties. This is high school From these themes,
          >I've generated key concepts and essential questions to ask throughout
          >the unit and to guide me in choosing assignments.
          >
          >Now I'm off to read the rest of the posts and follow the suggested links!
          >Kathleen
          >The Edge of Missouri, Almost Kansas
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >--- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "beyondskyline"
          ><beyondskyline@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Where do you stand with DBAE, guys? I took a class taught by a
          > > Teacher's College PhD, and he felt very negatively about it. He
          > > defined a "new" psychological approach that was founded on a child's
          > > everyday experience. The "motivation" would be class dialogue that
          > > brought up visual imagery for a child, say, pertaining to a day in the
          > > Fall. Stewart's book, on the other hand, is also "new", but she states
          > > that it's meant to augment DBAE. Any reaction?
          > >
          > > Thanks, I appreciate this topic, which began here,
          > > Sharon, NJ
          > >
          >
          >

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