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Learning Contracts

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  • mgalyk
    Hi, from Ohio, I would like to introduce learning contracts to my advanced art students this year - sort of design your own project. Iwould like to know if
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 2, 2007
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      Hi, from Ohio,

      I would like to introduce learning contracts to my advanced art students
      this year - sort of "design your own project." Iwould like to know if
      any of you are using contracts with your high school artists? If so,
      what format do they take? (Can you post/send an example?) How did you
      begin the process? How do you get HS students to set appropriate goals
      for their learning? How do you determine how much needs to be
      accomplished in a grading period to warrant a grade? Etc., etc., etc.! I
      have many more questions....

      Can anyone help me get started?

      Thanks so much,

      Marianne
    • Jeff Pridie
      Marianne, This is how I run my program. Students in the second half of a semester long Studio Class do the following. First they must develop a theme for a
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 2, 2007
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        Marianne,

        This is how I run my program. Students in the second
        half of a semester long Studio Class do the following.

        First they must develop a theme for a body of work.
        They are reminded Themes should be broad in order for
        them not to get stuck not having enough subject matter
        to work with.

        They have five projects to do in ten weeks. They must
        select the subject matter. They select the mediums.
        They select the size. They create a time line to
        manage their time.

        Each project is written up with a photo attached of
        the subject or a sketch. Included with the write up
        is the Theme Title, Subject Title, Medium(s), Size,
        Explanation of why the subject was selected, timeline.

        Students also keep a daily journal writing about the
        project they are working on. They write about three
        things daily: What did they do that day? What they
        thought about what they did/reaction to the work? What
        they thought of someone elses work in the room?

        Students are given points each day for journal entries
        if they include in their responses art terms.

        Students are given points for project write ups.

        Students are given points for each project (focus on
        technique, use of composition)

        Students works are asked to produce original works of
        art. Use original photographs or original designs.
        Original works are ranked higher then copy work.

        Students mat/mount/frame a body of work for the end of
        semester exhibition. Students are to create a
        computer generated posters, invitation, artist
        statement, nametags. Students set up the show, arrange
        the work.

        Students at midquarter have a class assessment of
        progress. Students select a work of art that has been
        completed by another student and talk about the
        qualities of the work that impress them. Students may
        select their own work if they wish. This is an
        example of a verbal response to others works.

        Points are assigned to the poster, invitation, artist
        statement, nametags and how they display the work.

        Each of these things is spelled out in a contract
        along with a rubric on what each thing should look
        like at its highest possible point scale.

        The goals they set can be found in their journal and
        timelines. Responses to their work can be found in
        their journals. Reactions and responses can be found
        in their jounals.

        Hope this helps some. I have been using this format
        for the last 24 years.

        Jeff (Minnesota)
        --- mgalyk <mgalyk@...> wrote:

        >
        > Hi, from Ohio,
        >
        > I would like to introduce learning contracts to my
        > advanced art students
        > this year - sort of "design your own project."
        > Iwould like to know if
        > any of you are using contracts with your high school
        > artists? If so,
        > what format do they take? (Can you post/send an
        > example?) How did you
        > begin the process? How do you get HS students to set
        > appropriate goals
        > for their learning? How do you determine how much
        > needs to be
        > accomplished in a grading period to warrant a grade?
        > Etc., etc., etc.! I
        > have many more questions....
        >
        > Can anyone help me get started?
        >
        > Thanks so much,
        >
        > Marianne
        >
        >
        >




        ____________________________________________________________________________________
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      • piketeach7
        Jeff, I like your idea about student developed themes. Could you share some the themes and perhaps how students adressed them. Thanks, Terry ...
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 3, 2007
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          Jeff,
          I like your idea about student developed themes. Could you share
          some the themes and perhaps how students adressed them.

          Thanks,
          Terry

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Marianne,
          >
          > This is how I run my program. Students in the second
          > half of a semester long Studio Class do the following.
          >
          > First they must develop a theme for a body of work.
          > They are reminded Themes should be broad in order for
          > them not to get stuck not having enough subject matter
          > to work with.
          >
          > They have five projects to do in ten weeks. They must
          > select the subject matter. They select the mediums.
          > They select the size. They create a time line to
          > manage their time.
          >
          > Each project is written up with a photo attached of
          > the subject or a sketch. Included with the write up
          > is the Theme Title, Subject Title, Medium(s), Size,
          > Explanation of why the subject was selected, timeline.
          >
          > Students also keep a daily journal writing about the
          > project they are working on. They write about three
          > things daily: What did they do that day? What they
          > thought about what they did/reaction to the work? What
          > they thought of someone elses work in the room?
          >
          > Students are given points each day for journal entries
          > if they include in their responses art terms.
          >
          > Students are given points for project write ups.
          >
          > Students are given points for each project (focus on
          > technique, use of composition)
          >
          > Students works are asked to produce original works of
          > art. Use original photographs or original designs.
          > Original works are ranked higher then copy work.
          >
          > Students mat/mount/frame a body of work for the end of
          > semester exhibition. Students are to create a
          > computer generated posters, invitation, artist
          > statement, nametags. Students set up the show, arrange
          > the work.
          >
          > Students at midquarter have a class assessment of
          > progress. Students select a work of art that has been
          > completed by another student and talk about the
          > qualities of the work that impress them. Students may
          > select their own work if they wish. This is an
          > example of a verbal response to others works.
          >
          > Points are assigned to the poster, invitation, artist
          > statement, nametags and how they display the work.
          >
          > Each of these things is spelled out in a contract
          > along with a rubric on what each thing should look
          > like at its highest possible point scale.
          >
          > The goals they set can be found in their journal and
          > timelines. Responses to their work can be found in
          > their journals. Reactions and responses can be found
          > in their jounals.
          >
          > Hope this helps some. I have been using this format
          > for the last 24 years.
          >
          > Jeff (Minnesota)
          > --- mgalyk <mgalyk@...> wrote:
          >
          > >
          > > Hi, from Ohio,
          > >
          > > I would like to introduce learning contracts to my
          > > advanced art students
          > > this year - sort of "design your own project."
          > > Iwould like to know if
          > > any of you are using contracts with your high school
          > > artists? If so,
          > > what format do they take? (Can you post/send an
          > > example?) How did you
          > > begin the process? How do you get HS students to set
          > > appropriate goals
          > > for their learning? How do you determine how much
          > > needs to be
          > > accomplished in a grading period to warrant a grade?
          > > Etc., etc., etc.! I
          > > have many more questions....
          > >
          > > Can anyone help me get started?
          > >
          > > Thanks so much,
          > >
          > > Marianne
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          ______________________________________________________________________
          ______________
          > Building a website is a piece of cake. Yahoo! Small Business gives
          you all the tools to get online.
          > http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/webhosting
          >
        • Jeff Pridie
          Terry, During the first part of the semester and calling on past knowledge from middle school and elementary the class spends time analyzing a variety of
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 3, 2007
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            Terry,

            During the first part of the semester and calling on
            past knowledge from middle school and elementary the
            class spends time analyzing a variety of paintings,
            drawings, scupltures etc. and they determine the
            possible theme for the work. This is a good exercise
            for them to think in broad terms. They work in groups
            of three or five (depending on the size of the class).
            They are given sets of images and decide how they
            might group them into themes they decide on. We look
            at old and new artworks.

            Students then are asked to evaluate and journal on
            specific themes they might feel connected to. I
            advice them sometimes it is best to start with what
            you are familiar with. So students might pick
            transportation, family, amimals, plants, war, peace,
            sports, vacation, etc. Students are then asked to
            look at each theme and consider how they might
            represent that in a subject. The subject can be
            something they create from their heads or from
            original photographs or plans. Students spend time
            putting together their subjects. Students are
            reminded that they can change the theme only if they
            can justify the reason for the change. They may
            change the subjects anytime explaining why the subject
            was not working. Students are told the selection of
            the theme and subjects is one of the most critical
            processes they will be asked to do. The selection of
            the theme and subjects sets the stage for the
            motivation in the project, the decision on mediums and
            a final product. I try to help students to come to
            understand just putting paint, chalk, pencil on a
            piece of paper might just be the easiest part of
            creation process. The hard part is making the
            decisions on what to do, what to do it in and assess
            how one is doing and how to improve it.

            Jeff (minnesota)
            --- piketeach7 <piketeach@...> wrote:

            > Jeff,
            > I like your idea about student developed themes.
            > Could you share
            > some the themes and perhaps how students adressed
            > them.
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Terry
            >
            > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Pridie
            > <jeffpridie@...>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Marianne,
            > >
            > > This is how I run my program. Students in the
            > second
            > > half of a semester long Studio Class do the
            > following.
            > >
            > > First they must develop a theme for a body of
            > work.
            > > They are reminded Themes should be broad in order
            > for
            > > them not to get stuck not having enough subject
            > matter
            > > to work with.
            > >
            > > They have five projects to do in ten weeks. They
            > must
            > > select the subject matter. They select the
            > mediums.
            > > They select the size. They create a time line to
            > > manage their time.
            > >
            > > Each project is written up with a photo attached
            > of
            > > the subject or a sketch. Included with the write
            > up
            > > is the Theme Title, Subject Title, Medium(s),
            > Size,
            > > Explanation of why the subject was selected,
            > timeline.
            > >
            > > Students also keep a daily journal writing about
            > the
            > > project they are working on. They write about
            > three
            > > things daily: What did they do that day? What they
            > > thought about what they did/reaction to the work?
            > What
            > > they thought of someone elses work in the room?
            > >
            > > Students are given points each day for journal
            > entries
            > > if they include in their responses art terms.
            > >
            > > Students are given points for project write ups.
            > >
            > > Students are given points for each project (focus
            > on
            > > technique, use of composition)
            > >
            > > Students works are asked to produce original works
            > of
            > > art. Use original photographs or original
            > designs.
            > > Original works are ranked higher then copy work.
            > >
            > > Students mat/mount/frame a body of work for the
            > end of
            > > semester exhibition. Students are to create a
            > > computer generated posters, invitation, artist
            > > statement, nametags. Students set up the show,
            > arrange
            > > the work.
            > >
            > > Students at midquarter have a class assessment of
            > > progress. Students select a work of art that has
            > been
            > > completed by another student and talk about the
            > > qualities of the work that impress them. Students
            > may
            > > select their own work if they wish. This is an
            > > example of a verbal response to others works.
            > >
            > > Points are assigned to the poster, invitation,
            > artist
            > > statement, nametags and how they display the work.
            > >
            > > Each of these things is spelled out in a contract
            > > along with a rubric on what each thing should look
            > > like at its highest possible point scale.
            > >
            > > The goals they set can be found in their journal
            > and
            > > timelines. Responses to their work can be found in
            > > their journals. Reactions and responses can be
            > found
            > > in their jounals.
            > >
            > > Hope this helps some. I have been using this
            > format
            > > for the last 24 years.
            > >
            > > Jeff (Minnesota)
            > > --- mgalyk <mgalyk@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > >
            > > > Hi, from Ohio,
            > > >
            > > > I would like to introduce learning contracts to
            > my
            > > > advanced art students
            > > > this year - sort of "design your own project."
            > > > Iwould like to know if
            > > > any of you are using contracts with your high
            > school
            > > > artists? If so,
            > > > what format do they take? (Can you post/send an
            > > > example?) How did you
            > > > begin the process? How do you get HS students to
            > set
            > > > appropriate goals
            > > > for their learning? How do you determine how
            > much
            > > > needs to be
            > > > accomplished in a grading period to warrant a
            > grade?
            > > > Etc., etc., etc.! I
            > > > have many more questions....
            > > >
            > > > Can anyone help me get started?
            > > >
            > > > Thanks so much,
            > > >
            > > > Marianne
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            ______________________________________________________________________
            > ______________
            > > Building a website is a piece of cake. Yahoo!
            > Small Business gives
            > you all the tools to get online.
            > > http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/webhosting
            > >
            >
            >
            >




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          • mgalyk
            Jeff, Thank you for your response. This sounds very much like what I want to do. I think I will have to ease them into it slowly to get them used to the idea
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 5, 2007
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              Jeff,

              Thank you for your response. This sounds very much like what I want to
              do. I think I will have to ease them into it slowly to get them used to
              the idea of being self-directed.

              Do you have a form they fill out for their theme/projects proposal? (And
              would you be willing to share it?) Do you have other forms you use -
              to keep track of points, plan the timeline, etc.? I am worried about how
              to keep them on track. I want them to write their own rubrics for
              project goals. They are already used to being given a rubric by me at
              the beginning of a project.

              I like your idea of the students basing their work around their own
              chosen theme. I have been working on a list of generalized themes
              (garnered from several sources) to help them explore new areas. Of
              course they would be welcome to come up with their own ideas too. :-)

              Thanks again for your help.

              Marianne in Ohio

              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Marianne,
              >
              > This is how I run my program. Students in the second
              > half of a semester long Studio Class do the following.
              > First they must develop a theme for a body of work.
              > They are reminded Themes should be broad in order for
              > them not to get stuck not having enough subject matter
              > to work with.
              >
              > They have five projects to do in ten weeks. They must
              > select the subject matter. They select the mediums.
              > They select the size. They create a time line to
              > manage their time.
              >
            • Jennifer Blair
              I m finding this topic very interesting. I m a teaching artist and I have also been involved in democratic education/self-directed learning for many years. I m
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 5, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                I'm finding this topic very interesting. I'm a teaching artist and I have also been involved in democratic education/self-directed learning for many years. I'm always excited when I see my two interests and passions intersecting for other folks as well.
                 
                If I may add my two cents... first I would suggest offering tools to help your students organize their time and stay on track but not require it.  Depending on the student and how controlled their education has been, making the transition to self-direction can can vary in difficulty for them. When kids transition from a structured school to one that is completely self-initiated it usually takes them about a year to decompress, come to trust and validate their own interests and direction and start exploring their ideas. I think writing their own rubrics is a great idea, it gives them the opportunity to think about how they want to assess their work.
                 
                I think its also important to keep in mind that artists have different processes. Some may start with a theme and create a body of work, some may create the work and then discover the theme. If we are to provide kids with authentic art making experiences its important to make room for their individual creative processes.
                 
                Thanks for letting me share,
                 
                Jennifer Blair, M.Ed.
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: mgalyk
                Sent: Thursday, July 05, 2007 10:00 AM
                Subject: [art_education] Re: Learning Contracts



                Jeff,

                Thank you for your response. This sounds very much like what I want to
                do. I think I will have to ease them into it slowly to get them used to
                the idea of being self-directed.

                Do you have a form they fill out for their theme/projects proposal? (And
                would you be willing to share it?) Do you have other forms you use -
                to keep track of points, plan the timeline, etc.? I am worried about how
                to keep them on track. I want them to write their own rubrics for
                project goals. They are already used to being given a rubric by me at
                the beginning of a project.

                I like your idea of the students basing their work around their own
                chosen theme. I have been working on a list of generalized themes
                (garnered from several sources) to help them explore new areas. Of
                course they would be welcome to come up with their own ideas too. :-)

                Thanks again for your help.

                Marianne in Ohio

                --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@ ...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Marianne,
                >
                > This is how I run my program. Students in the second
                > half of a semester long Studio Class do the following.
                > First they must develop a theme for a body of work.
                > They are reminded Themes should be broad in order for
                > them not to get stuck not having enough subject matter
                > to work with.
                >
                > They have five projects to do in ten weeks. They must
                > select the subject matter. They select the mediums.
                > They select the size. They create a time line to
                > manage their time.
                >

              • Jeff Pridie
                Jennifer, I will agree with both your statements. Flexibility is very important in self-directed structuring of the classroom. Learning styles vary among
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 5, 2007
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                  Jennifer,

                  I will agree with both your statements. Flexibility is
                  very important in self-directed structuring of the
                  classroom. Learning styles vary among students.
                  Giving all students a structure to begin with and then
                  adapting it to their individual style has greater
                  success.

                  I have had students that the timeline creation has
                  been a saving grace for them, some it is just a
                  reminder and others its a measure of the success they
                  are having. Some write very detailed timelines, some
                  just jot a word down. They all know that timelines
                  change for a variety of reasons. In their final
                  assessments to me they write that the timelines was a
                  new concept they had not experienced before and that I
                  let them have the flexibility on how to approach it.

                  I agree artist have different processes for creation
                  of works of art but for most of my students having
                  them ponder a theme and finding subjects based on
                  those themes has given my students the greatest amount
                  of success. Again flexibility is another point to
                  make here. I have had a few students who get into the
                  (flow) of creating works that seem to run a theme
                  throughout the whole body of work. They do this
                  without first stating a specific theme. The work is
                  created from their (core). Again there are very few of
                  my students who have mastered that ability. Most of
                  these students went on to explore art careers.

                  As an artist myself I try to give my students the most
                  realistic manner of what it is like to be an artist.
                  The focus is not so much on the final work created as
                  it is on the "thinking" that takes place to get to
                  that point.

                  Jeff (minnesota)


                  --- Jennifer Blair <noise44@...> wrote:

                  > I'm finding this topic very interesting. I'm a
                  > teaching artist and I have also been involved in
                  > democratic education/self-directed learning for many
                  > years. I'm always excited when I see my two
                  > interests and passions intersecting for other folks
                  > as well.
                  >
                  > If I may add my two cents... first I would suggest
                  > offering tools to help your students organize their
                  > time and stay on track but not require it.
                  > Depending on the student and how controlled their
                  > education has been, making the transition to
                  > self-direction can can vary in difficulty for them.
                  > When kids transition from a structured school to one
                  > that is completely self-initiated it usually takes
                  > them about a year to decompress, come to trust and
                  > validate their own interests and direction and start
                  > exploring their ideas. I think writing their own
                  > rubrics is a great idea, it gives them the
                  > opportunity to think about how they want to assess
                  > their work.
                  >
                  > I think its also important to keep in mind that
                  > artists have different processes. Some may start
                  > with a theme and create a body of work, some may
                  > create the work and then discover the theme. If we
                  > are to provide kids with authentic art making
                  > experiences its important to make room for their
                  > individual creative processes.
                  >
                  > Thanks for letting me share,
                  >
                  > Jennifer Blair, M.Ed.
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: mgalyk<mailto:mgalyk@...>
                  > To:
                  >
                  art_education@yahoogroups.com<mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com>
                  >
                  > Sent: Thursday, July 05, 2007 10:00 AM
                  > Subject: [art_education] Re: Learning Contracts
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Jeff,
                  >
                  > Thank you for your response. This sounds very much
                  > like what I want to
                  > do. I think I will have to ease them into it
                  > slowly to get them used to
                  > the idea of being self-directed.
                  >
                  > Do you have a form they fill out for their
                  > theme/projects proposal? (And
                  > would you be willing to share it?) Do you have
                  > other forms you use -
                  > to keep track of points, plan the timeline, etc.?
                  > I am worried about how
                  > to keep them on track. I want them to write their
                  > own rubrics for
                  > project goals. They are already used to being
                  > given a rubric by me at
                  > the beginning of a project.
                  >
                  > I like your idea of the students basing their work
                  > around their own
                  > chosen theme. I have been working on a list of
                  > generalized themes
                  > (garnered from several sources) to help them
                  > explore new areas. Of
                  > course they would be welcome to come up with their
                  > own ideas too. :-)
                  >
                  > Thanks again for your help.
                  >
                  > Marianne in Ohio
                  >
                  > --- In
                  >
                  art_education@yahoogroups.com<mailto:art_education%40yahoogroups.com>,
                  > Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@...>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Marianne,
                  > >
                  > > This is how I run my program. Students in the
                  > second
                  > > half of a semester long Studio Class do the
                  > following.
                  > > First they must develop a theme for a body of
                  > work.
                  > > They are reminded Themes should be broad in
                  > order for
                  > > them not to get stuck not having enough subject
                  > matter
                  > > to work with.
                  > >
                  > > They have five projects to do in ten weeks. They
                  > must
                  > > select the subject matter. They select the
                  > mediums.
                  > > They select the size. They create a time line to
                  > > manage their time.
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >




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