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Re: [art_education] I NEED TO VENT!

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  • Vicki Kolden
    Dear Christy, I think it is acceptable for you to call and ask if there is anything you could do to improve your next interviews. I have heard of people doing
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 6, 2007
      Dear Christy,
      I think it is acceptable for you to call and ask if there is anything you could do to improve your next interviews. I have heard of people doing this.  I just interviewed at a school that offered me the art job last year...and I got scared of leaving where I have been teaching for the last 19 years....Now this year...that same job was open still so I re- interviewed and I thought things were going good and I got the call and they said they hired a new teacher that just graduated because she wouldn't have to be paid as much as I would...so...that was disappointing...because the art room at that school is just state of the art...beautiful....and my art room is a recycled English room and that in a nutshell is why I was thinking of moving on because I wanted to work in a nice art room someday....but the staff where I am is wonderful and we all get along like family so I am just going to be happy where I am and be positive... Hang in there....something good will come along.
      Vickie in Mn
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2007 7:39 PM
      Subject: [art_education] I NEED TO VENT!

      I am looking for a teaching position closer to home (after being in the
      same school system for thirteen years) and finally had an interview in
      May. I thought the interview went well (I was there an hour just with
      the principal)and the thirteen years experience didn't seem to be a
      problem, but I just got word that they hired someone else. Has anyone
      ever contacted someone that you interviewed with to ask for "what you
      could do better on next time"? I am really upset- the school hours and
      fifteen minute drive from home would be so much better for my family
      (and me). I don't want to look like a stalker, but I am really
      frustrated! Any suggestions?

    • Jen Millward
      Hello Vickie and all, Veering off topic a bit here but am curious about something. Is it common for newer teachers to be hired before more experienced teachers
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 7, 2007

        Hello Vickie and all,

        Veering off topic a bit here but am curious about something. Is it common for newer teachers to be hired before more experienced teachers because of pay scale issues? I wonder how many of you have come across this before. I will be a new teacher next year and am looking at the job market. I’ve also heard that teachers without a Masters degree are hired before those with the degree because they could be paid less. Have any of you experienced that situation?

        Thanks for your help,

        Jen in NY

         


        From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Vicki Kolden
        Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2007 11:16 PM
        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [art_education] I NEED TO VENT!

         

        Dear Christy,

        I think it is acceptable for you to call and ask if there is anything you could do to improve your next interviews. I have heard of people doing this.  I just interviewed at a school that offered me the art job last year...and I got scared of leaving where I have been teaching for the last 19 years....Now this year...that same job was open still so I re- interviewed and I thought things were going good and I got the call and they said they hired a new teacher that just graduated because she wouldn't have to be paid as much as I would...so.. .that was disappointing. ..because the art room at that school is just state of the art...beautiful. ...and my art room is a recycled English room and that in a nutshell is why I was thinking of moving on because I wanted to work in a nice art room someday....but the staff where I am is wonderful and we all get along like family so I am just going to be happy where I am and be positive... Hang in there....something good will come along.

        Vickie in Mn

        .


      • Ken
        You are correct. Most districts will hire a teacher with less experience to save money. This includes teachers with masters degrees. They sometimes hire
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 7, 2007
          You are correct. Most districts will hire a teacher with less
          experience to save money. This includes teachers with masters degrees.
          They sometimes hire teachers with a few years experience (as they did
          me once with three years experience). Employee salaries are the single
          largest expenditure for a district and they try to save money when
          they can. Some districts will accept those with more experience if
          they accept a much lower pay scale. When I was a principal, the
          district told me how much I was allowed to spend on salaries, so in
          order to hire more teachers, I had to hire those with no or little
          experience.

          Ken

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Jen Millward" <jenmillward@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Hello Vickie and all,
          >
          > Veering off topic a bit here but am curious about something. Is it
          common
          > for newer teachers to be hired before more experienced teachers
          because of
          > pay scale issues? I wonder how many of you have come across this
          before. I
          > will be a new teacher next year and am looking at the job market.
          I've also
          > heard that teachers without a Masters degree are hired before those
          with the
          > degree because they could be paid less. Have any of you experienced that
          > situation?
          >
          > Thanks for your help,
          >
          > Jen in NY
          >
          >
          >
          > _____
          >
          > From: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com]
          > On Behalf Of Vicki Kolden
          > Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2007 11:16 PM
          > To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: Re: [art_education] I NEED TO VENT!
          >
          >
          >
          > Dear Christy,
          >
          > I think it is acceptable for you to call and ask if there is
          anything you
          > could do to improve your next interviews. I have heard of people
          doing this.
          > I just interviewed at a school that offered me the art job last
          year...and I
          > got scared of leaving where I have been teaching for the last 19
          > years....Now this year...that same job was open still so I re-
          interviewed
          > and I thought things were going good and I got the call and they
          said they
          > hired a new teacher that just graduated because she wouldn't have to
          be paid
          > as much as I would...so...that was disappointing...because the art
          room at
          > that school is just state of the art...beautiful....and my art room is a
          > recycled English room and that in a nutshell is why I was thinking
          of moving
          > on because I wanted to work in a nice art room someday....but the staff
          > where I am is wonderful and we all get along like family so I am
          just going
          > to be happy where I am and be positive... Hang in there....something
          good
          > will come along.
          >
          > Vickie in Mn
          >
          > .
          >
          >
          >
          <http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=3520770/grpspId=1705019151/msgId
          > =13940/stime=1181186229/nc1=4543830/nc2=3848642/nc3=4025306>
          >
        • Vicki Kolden
          Dear Jen, Well, the administrator that gave me my bad news said they went with the gal that just graduated from College because they could pay her $10,000
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 7, 2007
            Dear Jen,
            Well,  the administrator that gave me my bad news said they went with the gal that just graduated from College because they could pay her $10,000 dollars less than me...as I am a teacher with 19 years of experience...also about 10 years ago I applied for a different teaching job in the same town I live in,   and they too...told me the same thing...that with the experience they would have to pay me more so they hired someone right out of college....this is good for you....20 years ago when I was first in the job market administrators wanted experience...but in my experience and in my humble opinion.. I think you would have a good chance to get hired before someone who has been working a long time.
            Blessings,
            Vickie in Minnesota
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2007 7:05 AM
            Subject: RE: [art_education] I NEED TO VENT!

            Hello Vickie and all,

            Veering off topic a bit here but am curious about something. Is it common for newer teachers to be hired before more experienced teachers because of pay scale issues? I wonder how many of you have come across this before. I will be a new teacher next year and am looking at the job market. I’ve also heard that teachers without a Masters degree are hired before those with the degree because they could be paid less. Have any of you experienced that situation?

            Thanks for your help,

            Jen in NY


            From: art_education@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:art_ education@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Vicki Kolden
            Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2007 11:16 PM
            To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
            Subject: Re: [art_education] I NEED TO VENT!

            Dear Christy,

            I think it is acceptable for you to call and ask if there is anything you could do to improve your next interviews. I have heard of people doing this.  I just interviewed at a school that offered me the art job last year...and I got scared of leaving where I have been teaching for the last 19 years....Now this year...that same job was open still so I re- interviewed and I thought things were going good and I got the call and they said they hired a new teacher that just graduated because she wouldn't have to be paid as much as I would...so.. .that was disappointing. ..because the art room at that school is just state of the art...beautiful. ...and my art room is a recycled English room and that in a nutshell is why I was thinking of moving on because I wanted to work in a nice art room someday....but the staff where I am is wonderful and we all get along like family so I am just going to be happy where I am and be positive... Hang in there....something good will come along.

            Vickie in Mn

            .


          • Julie Casebourn
            Weird hiring situations have happened to me in the past 2 years. In a nutshell... I wasn´t looking for another art teaching position, but when 2 very large,
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 7, 2007
              Weird hiring situations have happened to me in the past 2 years.  In a nutshell... I wasn´t looking for another art teaching position, but when 2 very large, well-paying, growing districts both came to me and wanted to hire me (one of them being very close to my house) I couldn´t refuse.  The principals were the ones to make repeated contact... telling me that I was their number 1 choice and they wanted to interview me .. just as a formality you know, but basically leading me to believe that I had it in the bag.  Well... after a few weeks of not hearing anything I wondered what happened.  Both schools decided to go with very inexperienced teachers.. one fresh out of school.. the other... fairly new and the superintendents daughter-in-law... guess he didn´t know that she wanted the job.  Anyway.. both times it was a very humiliating experience to be told one thing and then to be ignored like I had done something wrong.   One never knows what goes on behind closed administrative doors.  You are not alone in your experience of not being hired when you probably were the best candidate, so please don´t take it personally.. it´s their loss. 

              Ken <kenroar@...> wrote:
              You are correct. Most districts will hire a teacher with less
              experience to save money. This includes teachers with masters degrees.
              They sometimes hire teachers with a few years experience (as they did
              me once with three years experience). Employee salaries are the single
              largest expenditure for a district and they try to save money when
              they can. Some districts will accept those with more experience if
              they accept a much lower pay scale. When I was a principal, the
              district told me how much I was allowed to spend on salaries, so in
              order to hire more teachers, I had to hire those with no or little
              experience.

              Ken

              --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, "Jen Millward" <jenmillward@ ...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Hello Vickie and all,
              >
              > Veering off topic a bit here but am curious about something. Is it
              common
              > for newer teachers to be hired before more experienced teachers
              because of
              > pay scale issues? I wonder how many of you have come across this
              before. I
              > will be a new teacher next year and am looking at the job market.
              I've also
              > heard that teachers without a Masters degree are hired before those
              with the
              > degree because they could be paid less. Have any of you experienced that
              > situation?
              >
              > Thanks for your help,
              >
              > Jen in NY
              >
              >
              >
              > _____
              >
              > From: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
              [mailto:art_education@ yahoogroups. com]
              > On Behalf Of Vicki Kolden
              > Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2007 11:16 PM
              > To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
              > Subject: Re: [art_education] I NEED TO VENT!
              >
              >
              >
              > Dear Christy,
              >
              > I think it is acceptable for you to call and ask if there is
              anything you
              > could do to improve your next interviews. I have heard of people
              doing this.
              > I just interviewed at a school that offered me the art job last
              year...and I
              > got scared of leaving where I have been teaching for the last 19
              > years....Now this year...that same job was open still so I re-
              interviewed
              > and I thought things were going good and I got the call and they
              said they
              > hired a new teacher that just graduated because she wouldn't have to
              be paid
              > as much as I would...so.. .that was disappointing. ..because the art
              room at
              > that school is just state of the art...beautiful. ...and my art room is a
              > recycled English room and that in a nutshell is why I was thinking
              of moving
              > on because I wanted to work in a nice art room someday....but the staff
              > where I am is wonderful and we all get along like family so I am
              just going
              > to be happy where I am and be positive... Hang in there....something
              good
              > will come along.
              >
              > Vickie in Mn
              >
              > .
              >
              >
              >
              <http://geo.yahoo. com/serv? s=97359714/ grpId=3520770/ grpspId=17050191 51/msgId
              > =13940/stime= 1181186229/ nc1=4543830/ nc2=3848642/ nc3=4025306>
              >



              You snooze, you lose. Get messages ASAP with AutoCheck
              in the all-new Yahoo! Mail Beta.

            • Patricia Knott
              Sometimes this may be the case, but not always. My district encourages candidates to get to the highest level possible as soon as they can. Some districts care
              Message 6 of 12 , Jun 7, 2007
                Sometimes this may be the case, but not always.
                My district encourages candidates to get to the highest level
                possible as soon as they can.
                Some districts care about quality and are very careful about weighing
                experience vs. "green."

                I'm in the midst of the hiring process -- and the foremost thought
                from all, at every level of the interviewing process, is the quality
                of the teaching, not how much it will cost.

                Some advice from me on getting hired:
                Do some homework -- come to an interview knowing
                something about the school and the community. Investigate district
                websites and you can surely see what they value.
                Make sure your paper work is error free. I toss out resumes
                constantly because of misspellings, and bad grammar. If you don't
                care enough to check your own work how will you be as a teacher?
                Along with that, I'm old school and I was taught to NOT use the first
                person in essays.
                If a job has specific requirements make sure you can meet
                them. Be prepared for tough questions and the latest education
                jargon. Administrators don't care about art, they care about student
                success and class room management and higher order thinking skills
                and differentiation, and special needs and connecting across the
                curriculum and writing! tell them that you not only require writing
                for reflection , but writing that fosters persuasive skills.
                I hate to say this, but the perception that an artist is
                "flaky" persists. I have watched too many administrator eyes
                glaze over when a candidate rambles about art stuff that doesn't
                address the question asked. Be precise.
                Remember etiquette. Thank your interviewers, but not by e-
                mail. And certainly don't send an e-mail clarifying a question the
                you answered badly.

                Getting a job anywhere in any field is difficult. Remember
                foremost ,that there are hundreds out there wanting what you want and
                you have to separate yourself some how, some way. It is never about
                what is convenient for you--- it's about what you will do for the
                district. Make every offer you can to make yourself look eager and
                willing--- because there are plenty to choose from.

                The best of luck to all of you looking. It truly is a crap
                shoot ....on both ends.

                and P.S. we all DO check references

                Patty


                On Jun 7, 2007, at 11:45 AM, Ken wrote:

                > You are correct. Most districts will hire a teacher with less
                > experience to save money. This includes teachers with masters degrees.
                > They sometimes hire teachers with a few years experience (as they did
                > me once with three years experience). Employee salaries are the single
                > largest expenditure for a district and they try to save money when
                > they can. Some districts will accept those with more experience if
                > they accept a much lower pay scale. When I was a principal, the
                > district told me how much I was allowed to spend on salaries, so in
                > order to hire more teachers, I had to hire those with no or little
                > experience.
                >
                > Ken
                >
              • Jen Millward
                Thank you Patricia, Vickie, and Ken for your advice and telling of your experiences regarding this issue. As a career changer going from healthcare to
                Message 7 of 12 , Jun 7, 2007

                  Thank you Patricia, Vickie, and Ken for your advice and telling of your experiences regarding this issue. As a “career changer” going from healthcare to education, I value any and all information that I receive regarding the job market in our field. I currently substitute and, while I enjoy subbing, I don’t want to do it for years on end. So the quicker I can get to a permanent position, the better. J

                  Thanks again,

                  Jen in NY

                   


                  From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Patricia Knott
                  Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2007 6:07 PM
                  To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: I NEED TO VENT!

                   

                  Sometimes this may be the case, but not always.
                  My district encourages candidates to get to the highest level
                  possible as soon as they can.
                  Some districts care about quality and are very careful about weighing
                  experience vs. "green."

                  I'm in the midst of the hiring process -- and the foremost thought
                  from all, at every level of the interviewing process, is the quality
                  of the teaching, not how much it will cost.

                  Some advice from me on getting hired:
                  Do some homework -- come to an interview knowing
                  something about the school and the community. Investigate district
                  websites and you can surely see what they value.
                  Make sure your paper work is error free. I toss out resumes
                  constantly because of misspellings, and bad grammar. If you don't
                  care enough to check your own work how will you be as a teacher?
                  Along with that, I'm old school and I was taught to NOT use the first
                  person in essays.
                  If a job has specific requirements make sure you can meet
                  them. Be prepared for tough questions and the latest education
                  jargon. Administrators don't care about art, they care about student
                  success and class room management and higher order thinking skills
                  and differentiation, and special needs and connecting across the
                  curriculum and writing! tell them that you not only require writing
                  for reflection , but writing that fosters persuasive skills.
                  I hate to say this, but the perception that an artist is
                  "flaky" persists. I have watched too many administrator eyes
                  glaze over when a candidate rambles about art stuff that doesn't
                  address the question asked. Be precise.
                  Remember etiquette. Thank your interviewers, but not by e-
                  mail. And certainly don't send an e-mail clarifying a question the
                  you answered badly.

                  Getting a job anywhere in any field is difficult. Remember
                  foremost ,that there are hundreds out there wanting what you want and
                  you have to separate yourself some how, some way. It is never about
                  what is convenient for you--- it's about what you will do for the
                  district. Make every offer you can to make yourself look eager and
                  willing--- because there are plenty to choose from.

                  The best of luck to all of you looking. It truly is a crap
                  shoot ....on both ends.

                  and P.S. we all DO check references

                  Patty

                  On Jun 7, 2007, at 11:45 AM, Ken wrote:

                  > You are correct. Most districts will hire a teacher with less
                  > experience to save money. This includes teachers with masters degrees.
                  > They sometimes hire teachers with a few years experience (as they did
                  > me once with three years experience). Employee salaries are the single
                  > largest expenditure for a district and they try to save money when
                  > they can. Some districts will accept those with more experience if
                  > they accept a much lower pay scale. When I was a principal, the
                  > district told me how much I was allowed to spend on salaries, so in
                  > order to hire more teachers, I had to hire those with no or little
                  > experience.
                  >
                  > Ken
                  >

                • piketeach7
                  ... your ... receive ... while I ... quicker I can ... [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] ... weighing ... quality ... first ... student ... and ...
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jun 7, 2007
                    --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Jen Millward"
                    <jenmillward@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thank you Patricia, Vickie, and Ken for your advice and telling of
                    your
                    > experiences regarding this issue. As a "career changer" going from
                    > healthcare to education, I value any and all information that I
                    receive
                    > regarding the job market in our field. I currently substitute and,
                    while I
                    > enjoy subbing, I don't want to do it for years on end. So the
                    quicker I can
                    > get to a permanent position, the better. :-)
                    >
                    > Thanks again,
                    >
                    > Jen in NY
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > _____
                    >
                    > From: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                    [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com]
                    > On Behalf Of Patricia Knott
                    > Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2007 6:07 PM
                    > To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [art_education] Re: I NEED TO VENT!
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Sometimes this may be the case, but not always.
                    > My district encourages candidates to get to the highest level
                    > possible as soon as they can.
                    > Some districts care about quality and are very careful about
                    weighing
                    > experience vs. "green."
                    >
                    > I'm in the midst of the hiring process -- and the foremost thought
                    > from all, at every level of the interviewing process, is the
                    quality
                    > of the teaching, not how much it will cost.
                    >
                    > Some advice from me on getting hired:
                    > Do some homework -- come to an interview knowing
                    > something about the school and the community. Investigate district
                    > websites and you can surely see what they value.
                    > Make sure your paper work is error free. I toss out resumes
                    > constantly because of misspellings, and bad grammar. If you don't
                    > care enough to check your own work how will you be as a teacher?
                    > Along with that, I'm old school and I was taught to NOT use the
                    first
                    > person in essays.
                    > If a job has specific requirements make sure you can meet
                    > them. Be prepared for tough questions and the latest education
                    > jargon. Administrators don't care about art, they care about
                    student
                    > success and class room management and higher order thinking skills
                    > and differentiation, and special needs and connecting across the
                    > curriculum and writing! tell them that you not only require writing
                    > for reflection , but writing that fosters persuasive skills.
                    > I hate to say this, but the perception that an artist is
                    > "flaky" persists. I have watched too many administrator eyes
                    > glaze over when a candidate rambles about art stuff that doesn't
                    > address the question asked. Be precise.
                    > Remember etiquette. Thank your interviewers, but not by e-
                    > mail. And certainly don't send an e-mail clarifying a question the
                    > you answered badly.
                    >
                    > Getting a job anywhere in any field is difficult. Remember
                    > foremost ,that there are hundreds out there wanting what you want
                    and
                    > you have to separate yourself some how, some way. It is never about
                    > what is convenient for you--- it's about what you will do for the
                    > district. Make every offer you can to make yourself look eager and
                    > willing--- because there are plenty to choose from.
                    >
                    > The best of luck to all of you looking. It truly is a crap
                    > shoot ....on both ends.
                    >
                    > and P.S. we all DO check references
                    >
                    > Patty
                    >
                    > On Jun 7, 2007, at 11:45 AM, Ken wrote:
                    >
                    > > You are correct. Most districts will hire a teacher with less
                    > > experience to save money. This includes teachers with masters
                    degrees.
                    > > They sometimes hire teachers with a few years experience (as they
                    did
                    > > me once with three years experience). Employee salaries are the
                    single
                    > > largest expenditure for a district and they try to save money when
                    > > they can. Some districts will accept those with more experience if
                    > > they accept a much lower pay scale. When I was a principal, the
                    > > district told me how much I was allowed to spend on salaries, so
                    in
                    > > order to hire more teachers, I had to hire those with no or little
                    > > experience.
                    > >
                    > > Ken
                    > >
                    >Hey and Howdy,
                    While all the contributors to this thread have had valid points,
                    there is also another concern. I found out the hard way that I made
                    a mistake early in my career. I did not research the district that
                    wanted to hire me closely enough. As it turns out, a district's
                    reputation can mean more than your personal experience should you
                    want to change jobs. Some districts will simply not hire teachers
                    from certain other districts because they believe that they have been
                    tainted by theat district's training and traditions.

                    Keep trying and good luck.

                    Terry
                  • Act Silly 4 Art
                    Working in the private school sector what I have found is quite the opposite. Teachers with years of experience or a Masters or even a PhD are hired much more
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jun 8, 2007
                      Working in the private school sector what I have found is quite the opposite.  Teachers with years of experience or a Masters or even a PhD are hired much more easily then teachers with a BA or little experience.  The reason being is that most private schools in Hawaii relish the reputation of listing faculty members who have degrees above the average public school teacher.  It basically justifies the need to charge $15000 a year for tuition.  When I first started looking for a teaching job in the private school sector I was told at several top schools that their preference for the position was either someone with a Masters, an established Artist with recognized showings, or a teacher with more than 10 years experience in the field.  On the other hand, the Hawaii State Teacher's Association didn't care if I didn't have a teaching certificate or a non-education BA, they just wanted to hire me because of the huge teacher shortage in the state.  Hawaii is a funny state when it comes to Public and Private school hirings and what people here consider valuable.
                       
                      cat in honolulu
                       
                      Ken <kenroar@...> wrote:
                      You are correct. Most districts will hire a teacher with less
                      experience to save money. This includes teachers with masters degrees.
                      They sometimes hire teachers with a few years experience (as they did
                      me once with three years experience). Employee salaries are the single
                      largest expenditure for a district and they try to save money when
                      they can. Some districts will accept those with more experience if
                      they accept a much lower pay scale. When I was a principal, the
                      district told me how much I was allowed to spend on salaries, so in
                      order to hire more teachers, I had to hire those with no or little
                      experience.

                      Ken

                      --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, "Jen Millward" <jenmillward@ ...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > Hello Vickie and all,
                      >
                      > Veering off topic a bit here but am curious about something. Is it
                      common
                      > for newer teachers to be hired before more experienced teachers
                      because of
                      > pay scale issues? I wonder how many of you have come across this
                      before. I
                      > will be a new teacher next year and am looking at the job market.
                      I've also
                      > heard that teachers without a Masters degree are hired before those
                      with the
                      > degree because they could be paid less. Have any of you experienced that
                      > situation?
                      >
                      > Thanks for your help,
                      >
                      > Jen in NY
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > _____
                      >
                      > From: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                      [mailto:art_education@ yahoogroups. com]
                      > On Behalf Of Vicki Kolden
                      > Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2007 11:16 PM
                      > To: art_education@ yahoogroups. com
                      > Subject: Re: [art_education] I NEED TO VENT!
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Dear Christy,
                      >
                      > I think it is acceptable for you to call and ask if there is
                      anything you
                      > could do to improve your next interviews. I have heard of people
                      doing this.
                      > I just interviewed at a school that offered me the art job last
                      year...and I
                      > got scared of leaving where I have been teaching for the last 19
                      > years....Now this year...that same job was open still so I re-
                      interviewed
                      > and I thought things were going good and I got the call and they
                      said they
                      > hired a new teacher that just graduated because she wouldn't have to
                      be paid
                      > as much as I would...so.. .that was disappointing. ..because the art
                      room at
                      > that school is just state of the art...beautiful. ...and my art room is a
                      > recycled English room and that in a nutshell is why I was thinking
                      of moving
                      > on because I wanted to work in a nice art room someday....but the staff
                      > where I am is wonderful and we all get along like family so I am
                      just going
                      > to be happy where I am and be positive... Hang in there....something
                      good
                      > will come along.
                      >
                      > Vickie in Mn
                      >
                      > .
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      <http://geo.yahoo. com/serv? s=97359714/ grpId=3520770/ grpspId=17050191 51/msgId
                      > =13940/stime= 1181186229/ nc1=4543830/ nc2=3848642/ nc3=4025306>
                      >



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                    • Ken
                      I know exactly what happened the principals told the superintendent that they wanted to hire you. The first thing he/she asked was, How many years experience
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jun 8, 2007
                        I know exactly what happened the principals told the superintendent
                        that they wanted to hire you. The first thing he/she asked was,"How
                        many years experience does she have?" After they said 19 years, their
                        superintendent said they couldn't afford you. The principals were
                        upset but went ahead and hired the newbie. I had this happen to me a
                        few times, so I am pretty sure this is what happened.

                        By the way, some districts will hire teachers with experience if they
                        are upfront that they will be willing to work at a lower pay scale.

                        Ken

                        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Julie Casebourn <juliecas@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > Weird hiring situations have happened to me in the past 2 years. In
                        a nutshell... I wasn�t looking for another art teaching position, but
                        when 2 very large, well-paying, growing districts both came to me and
                        wanted to hire me (one of them being very close to my house) I
                        couldn�t refuse. The principals were the ones to make repeated
                        contact... telling me that I was their number 1 choice and they wanted
                        to interview me .. just as a formality you know, but basically leading
                        me to believe that I had it in the bag. Well... after a few weeks of
                        not hearing anything I wondered what happened. Both schools decided
                        to go with very inexperienced teachers.. one fresh out of school.. the
                        other... fairly new and the superintendents daughter-in-law... guess
                        he didn�t know that she wanted the job. Anyway.. both times it was a
                        very humiliating experience to be told one thing and then to be
                        ignored like I had done something wrong. One never knows what goes
                        on behind closed
                        > administrative doors. You are not alone in your experience of not
                        being hired when you probably were the best candidate, so please don�t
                        take it personally.. it�s their loss.
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