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Re: Great one day lessons for fourth grade needed!

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  • Amy Broady
    It s kind of messy, but the kids would love it: SHAVING CREAM MARBLING. Let me know if you need more details. You could also try blow painting...that s what I
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2007
      It's kind of messy, but the kids would love it:

      SHAVING CREAM MARBLING.

      Let me know if you need more details.

      You could also try blow painting...that's what I did during our big
      standardized testing week when my classes were whittled down to 30
      minutes, back-to-back. The students really enjoyed that.

      You could also try bubble painting.

      Best wishes,
      Amy in TN
    • Vicki Kolden
      Bubble painting...sounds cool...what is it? Vickie in Mn ... From: Amy Broady To: art_education@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:46 PM Subject:
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2007
        Bubble painting...sounds cool...what is it?
        Vickie in Mn
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 3:46 PM
        Subject: [art_education] Re: Great one day lessons for fourth grade needed!

        It's kind of messy, but the kids would love it:

        SHAVING CREAM MARBLING.

        Let me know if you need more details.

        You could also try blow painting...that' s what I did during our big
        standardized testing week when my classes were whittled down to 30
        minutes, back-to-back. The students really enjoyed that.

        You could also try bubble painting.

        Best wishes,
        Amy in TN

      • Amy Broady
        Bubble painting involves adding a few drops of dishwashing liquid to your paint, which might need to be thinned a bit. (You ll need to experiment, of course.)
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 1, 2007
          Bubble painting involves adding a few drops of dishwashing liquid to
          your paint, which might need to be thinned a bit. (You'll need to
          experiment, of course.) You then use a straw to blow bubbles up over
          the top of the container.

          When the bubbles have formed a nice mound, pat a piece of paper onto
          them. They will transfer to the paper and dry in a lovely pattern.
          You can pat the same paper multiple times to get good coverage. It's
          nice also to have several containers with a range of compatible
          colors (i.e. royal blue, turquoise, and green).

          Each student should have his or her own straw to use, but can switch
          colors with that straw.

          A cool-whip tub works well for this; last time I did it with a class,
          I used yogurt containers, and they were a bit small, but still
          worked. You do not want the container to have a lot in it--I'd say
          maybe 1/4 of the way full or so.

          These paintings are great to cut up for collages, but my students
          were happy to just take them home as a painting.

          HTH,
          Amy in TN
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