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uses for broken crayons,,,

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  • Terri Noell
    I am looking for lots of projects to do with TONS of broken crayons......let s see if we can come up with atleast 50..... 1.shread and sprinkle on wax paper
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 4, 2007
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      I am looking for lots of projects to do with TONS of broken
      crayons......let's see if we can come up with atleast 50.....

      1.shread and sprinkle on wax paper cover with another sheet of wax paper and
      iron both together...placemats, greeting cards...mobile..
      2. Batik
      3. plaques by melting the crayon shavings between 2 sheets of wax paper with
      a warm iron and let that dry. Then we outlined a shape - like a coffee pot
      or something and cut it out of the shavings after they hardened - then
      peeled the wax paper off. Place it in a frame for the wall.
      4. I like the notion of melting them into tins for JUMBO crayons and I
      wonder if extending the length of them by placing them in a cigarette holder
      would work. You can get them in a couple different lengths
      5. I also made rainbow crayons by breaking them up and heating them and
      puttig them in muffin tins with liners...cool ...the kids loved them ...I
      made for all 578 students my 1st year at this school for Christmas
      presents....
      6. Cut out a piece of sandpaper, the more coarse the better. Allow the
      children to draw a picture on the rough surface with leftover crayons. Once
      the sandpaper is all colored, place in the oven on an old cookie sheet at
      low. It makes a bit of a waxy smell, but once the pictures are melted on the
      sandpaper, let dry and you have an art piece to cherish
      7. crayons broken in small bits and shavings, we made a picture on a sheet
      of drawing paper. After that, we covered the crayon shaving picture with a
      sheet of paper and ironed the design in, by carefully moving over it with a
      warm iron and slight pressure. Very like a stain glass effect and fun to do.
      8.....

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    • Hillmer, Jan
      - Take your project #6,- color hard on the sandpaper, but iron it onto another piece of paper (don t place it in the oven) - great texture/print project. -
      Message 2 of 14 , Feb 5, 2007
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              -   Take your project #6,- color hard on the sandpaper, but iron it onto another piece of paper (don’t place it in the oven) – great texture/print project.

         

        -          Glue together to make crayon people (never tried this – just a possible idea).

         

        Jan

         


        From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Terri Noell
        Sent: Sunday, February 04, 2007 10:12 PM
        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [art_education] uses for broken crayons,,,

         

        I am looking for lots of projects to do with TONS of broken
        crayons..... .let's see if we can come up with atleast 50.....

        1.shread and sprinkle on wax paper cover with another sheet of wax paper and
        iron both together...placemat s, greeting cards...mobile. .
        2. Batik
        3. plaques by melting the crayon shavings between 2 sheets of wax paper with
        a warm iron and let that dry. Then we outlined a shape - like a coffee pot
        or something and cut it out of the shavings after they hardened - then
        peeled the wax paper off. Place it in a frame for the wall.
        4. I like the notion of melting them into tins for JUMBO crayons and I
        wonder if extending the length of them by placing them in a cigarette holder
        would work. You can get them in a couple different lengths
        5. I also made rainbow crayons by breaking them up and heating them and
        puttig them in muffin tins with liners...cool ...the kids loved them ...I
        made for all 578 students my 1st year at this school for Christmas
        presents....
        6. Cut out a piece of sandpaper, the more coarse the better. Allow the
        children to draw a picture on the rough surface with leftover crayons. Once
        the sandpaper is all colored, place in the oven on an old cookie sheet at
        low. It makes a bit of a waxy smell, but once the pictures are melted on the
        sandpaper, let dry and you have an art piece to cherish
        7. crayons broken in small bits and shavings, we made a picture on a sheet
        of drawing paper. After that, we covered the crayon shaving picture with a
        sheet of paper and ironed the design in, by carefully moving over it with a
        warm iron and slight pressure. Very like a stain glass effect and fun to do.
        8.....

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      • jdecker4art
        Dear Art Educators, Here is a Getty list post from Tom Bisogno What to do with stubby and broken crayons. When Harold Rabinowitz was teaching art in New HAven
        Message 3 of 14 , Feb 5, 2007
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          Dear Art Educators,

          Here is a Getty list post from Tom Bisogno

          What to do with stubby and broken crayons.

          When Harold Rabinowitz was teaching art in New HAven during the
          1960's he found himself deluged with stubby and broken crayons in
          his class room. Not one to waste, he began designing tools to melt
          the crayon pieces and some smaller tools to apply it. By 1968,
          Harold's' first Waxmelter Palette was being used in many school art
          programs. Thirty years and a number of design revisions later, the
          Waxmelter Palette is still a good tool for encaustic and batik
          instruction. He also designed an electric Wax Batik Pen for finer
          line work. Harold and Kiki will be at the NYC NAEA conference in
          March demonstrating wax drawing technique at the Twisteez booth
          #210 . Stop by and say hello to them.
          ---------------------------------------------------------

          You might want to add some waxmelter palettes to your wish list.

          Judy Decker
        • Jen Millward
          8. Make a sculpture out of old crayons. 9. We shave crayons for coloring Easter eggs. Heat up water in a large tin can using a double-boiler sort of system
          Message 4 of 14 , Feb 5, 2007
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            8. Make a sculpture out of old crayons.

            9. We shave crayons for coloring Easter eggs. Heat up water in a large tin can using a double-boiler sort of system (can with water in it inside a pot with a few inches in it. Sprinkle a few shavings in the water and then dip a room-temperature boiled egg just below the surface of the water using an egg dipper. Swirl around, take out of water and set somewhere to cool and dry.

            10…

             

            From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Terri Noell
            Sent: Sunday, February 04, 2007 10:12 PM
            To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [art_education] uses for broken crayons,,,

             

            I am looking for lots of projects to do with TONS of broken
            crayons......let's see if we can come up with atleast 50.....

            1.shread and sprinkle on wax paper cover with another sheet of wax paper and
            iron both together...placemats, greeting cards...mobile..
            2. Batik
            3. plaques by melting the crayon shavings between 2 sheets of wax paper with
            a warm iron and let that dry. Then we outlined a shape - like a coffee pot
            or something and cut it out of the shavings after they hardened - then
            peeled the wax paper off. Place it in a frame for the wall.
            4. I like the notion of melting them into tins for JUMBO crayons and I
            wonder if extending the length of them by placing them in a cigarette holder
            would work. You can get them in a couple different lengths
            5. I also made rainbow crayons by breaking them up and heating them and
            puttig them in muffin tins with liners...cool ...the kids loved them ...I
            made for all 578 students my 1st year at this school for Christmas
            presents....
            6. Cut out a piece of sandpaper, the more coarse the better. Allow the
            children to draw a picture on the rough surface with leftover crayons. Once
            the sandpaper is all colored, place in the oven on an old cookie sheet at
            low. It makes a bit of a waxy smell, but once the pictures are melted on the
            sandpaper, let dry and you have an art piece to cherish
            7. crayons broken in small bits and shavings, we made a picture on a sheet
            of drawing paper. After that, we covered the crayon shaving picture with a
            sheet of paper and ironed the design in, by carefully moving over it with a
            warm iron and slight pressure. Very like a stain glass effect and fun to do.
            8.....

            __________________________________________________________
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          • cen_aca_dp
            I simply save them in a box and use them for texture rubbbings (frottage). BTW, I was looking up frottage and was very disturbed by the alternate definition:
            Message 5 of 14 , Feb 5, 2007
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              I simply save them in a box and use them for texture rubbbings (frottage).
              BTW, I was looking up "frottage" and was very disturbed by the alternate
              definition:
              http://www.thefreedictionary.com/frottage

              Who knew?

              Denise Pannell

              Apache Kids'Art now online!
              http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=36837

              http://natepannell.memory-of.com/
              "There are no goodbyes for us. Wherever you are, you will always be in my heart. Ghandi"
            • Barbara Davis
              Back in the 70 s we made sand candles and used crayons to color the wax. You use clean sand which can be bought at any home building supply store. The sand
              Message 6 of 14 , Feb 5, 2007
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                Back in the 70's we made sand candles and used crayons to color the wax.

                You use clean sand which can be bought at any home building supply store.
                The sand gets wetted and packed into cardboard boxes, milk containers, etc.
                Then kids scoop out the sand into the shape they want their candle. Note:
                It's important to have a flat base so the candle stands up. We sometimes
                embedded small shells, marbles, etc into the edges of the sand mold before
                pouring in the wax.

                Purchase plain blocks of Gulf Wax and melt in a pan over a hot plate. Peel
                crayons and drop into the melted wax and stir to dissolve. Just like working
                with any pigment, a mix of too many colors gets muddy. Keep separated by
                color and mix according to secondary colors, maybe some tertiary.

                Have wicks cut long enough to tie onto a stone or other small object to
                anchor them to the bottom of the mold, then the wick comes up and wraps
                around a pencil or stick which rests across top of the box/container.
                Carefully pour the colored melted wax into the form to the right height.
                Kids' forms shouldn't be huge...remember that the volume of melted wax has
                to fill the form(s).

                Let wax set up...best to wait until the next day. Kids peel off the milk
                carton or cardboard box and brush away excess sand. Some sand stays embedded
                around the outer surface giving a nice texture. Trim the wick to about 1/2
                inch above the surface of the candle.


                Any easy alternative is to pour the wax into Bell Jars (canning jars) rather
                than sand molds but kids have to think carefully about their shape and
                design and the base if you work with sand. Far less learning using the bell
                jars.

                Barbara Davis
                bdavis@...
              • aliteachesart
                I have a few shoebox sized tubs of old crayons that the kids can use if they finish early (and marker tubs, colored pencils, etc.) I skin crayons to have
                Message 7 of 14 , Feb 5, 2007
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                  I have a few shoebox sized tubs of old crayons that the kids can use if they finish early
                  (and marker tubs, colored pencils, etc.) I skin crayons to have ready for texture rubbings,
                  and I add old crayons and stubby pencils to the collage materials- kids love to glue them
                  on or draw with them. What about bagging some up for the kids that say they don't have
                  any art materials?

                  What about a mural (or poster) made out of crayon mosaic? I am thinking a rainbow....

                  What can you do with old oil pastels? Ali
                • familyerickson
                  I bought an old hot plate (like you keep dishes heated up on in the 60 s) at a garage sale. My kinders love it when I get it out, heat it up, lay a sheet of
                  Message 8 of 14 , Feb 5, 2007
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                    I bought an old hot plate (like you keep dishes heated up on in the 60's)  at a garage sale.   My kinders love it when I get it out, heat it up, lay a sheet of paper on top and let them draw slowly with old crayons.   This activity must be monitored at all times.   I also lay a folded up towel at the edge of the hot plate so that they can lean their arm and not get burned.  
                    Cindy  
                     
                  • MaryAnn F. Kohl
                    Don¹t forget painting with liquid melted crayon for encaustic painting. Maybe someone already said that. MaryAnn ... Re: [art_education] Re:uses for broken
                    Message 9 of 14 , Feb 5, 2007
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                      Re: [art_education] Re:uses for broken crayons,,, Don’t forget painting with liquid melted crayon for encaustic painting.
                      Maybe someone already said that.

                      MaryAnn


                      On  2/5/07 3:45 PM,  familyerickson  familyerickson@...  emailed:
                      I bought an old hot plate (like you keep dishes heated up on in the 60's)  at a garage sale.   My kinders love it when I get it out, heat it up, lay a sheet of paper on top and let them draw slowly with old crayons.   This activity must be monitored at all times.   I also lay a folded up towel at the edge of the hot plate so that they can lean their arm and not get burned.  
                      Cindy  

                       
                    • Kelli Wilke
                      We have a large mural done with crayone stubs...kind of like mosaic style but without the grout. Then it was framed right on the wall. Kelli in NE MaryAnn
                      Message 10 of 14 , Feb 6, 2007
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                        We have a large "mural" done with crayone stubs...kind of like mosaic style but without the grout.  Then it was framed right on the wall. 
                        Kelli in NE
                         


                        "MaryAnn F. Kohl" <maryann@...> wrote:
                        Don’t forget painting with liquid melted crayon for encaustic painting.
                        Maybe someone already said that.

                        MaryAnn


                        On  2/5/07 3:45 PM,  familyerickson  familyerickson@ cox.net  emailed:
                        I bought an old hot plate (like you keep dishes heated up on in the 60's)  at a garage sale.   My kinders love it when I get it out, heat it up, lay a sheet of paper on top and let them draw slowly with old crayons.   This activity must be monitored at all times.   I also lay a folded up towel at the edge of the hot plate so that they can lean their arm and not get burned.  
                        Cindy  

                         


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                      • Terri Noell
                        have any pictures? I d love to see this! Thanks! Terri in Florida ... _________________________________________________________________ Valentine’s Day --
                        Message 11 of 14 , Feb 6, 2007
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                          have any pictures? I'd love to see this!
                          Thanks!
                          Terri in Florida


                          >From: Kelli Wilke <kdenne14@...>
                          >Reply-To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                          >To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
                          >Subject: Re: [art_education] Re:uses for broken crayons,,,
                          >Date: Tue, 6 Feb 2007 18:53:14 -0800 (PST)
                          >
                          >We have a large "mural" done with crayone stubs...kind of like mosaic style
                          >but without the grout. Then it was framed right on the wall.
                          > Kelli in NE
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >"MaryAnn F. Kohl" <maryann@...> wrote:
                          > Don�t forget painting with liquid melted crayon for encaustic
                          >painting.
                          >Maybe someone already said that.
                          >
                          >MaryAnn
                          >
                          >
                          >On 2/5/07 3:45 PM, familyerickson familyerickson@... emailed:
                          > I bought an old hot plate (like you keep dishes heated up on in the
                          >60's) at a garage sale. My kinders love it when I get it out, heat it
                          >up, lay a sheet of paper on top and let them draw slowly with old crayons.
                          > This activity must be monitored at all times. I also lay a folded up
                          >towel at the edge of the hot plate so that they can lean their arm and not
                          >get burned.
                          >Cindy
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >---------------------------------
                          >Cheap Talk? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.

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                        • Sherri Treeby
                          I remember reading that you can use them for making candles (for color). Has anyone tried this? Sherri South Dakota familyerickson
                          Message 12 of 14 , Feb 6, 2007
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                            I remember reading that you can use them for making candles (for color).  Has anyone tried this?
                            Sherri
                            South Dakota

                            familyerickson <familyerickson@...> wrote:
                            I bought an old hot plate (like you keep dishes heated up on in the 60's)  at a garage sale.   My kinders love it when I get it out, heat it up, lay a sheet of paper on top and let them draw slowly with old crayons.   This activity must be monitored at all times.   I also lay a folded up towel at the edge of the hot plate so that they can lean their arm and not get burned.  
                            Cindy  
                             



                            Sherri T.


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                            always stay connected to friends.

                          • Jessica
                            I vaguely recall making candles with crayons. I believe my mom put the crayons in an old coffee can and heated them up on a hot plate. We would mix colors
                            Message 13 of 14 , Feb 7, 2007
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                              I vaguely recall making candles with crayons. I believe my mom put
                              the crayons in an old coffee can and heated them up on a hot plate.
                              We would mix colors together to create new colors. We took a pencil
                              and tied a string to it for the wick, and then dipped the wick into
                              the melted crayons. It took a long time, and we never attempted to
                              test the candles, but I'm sure you could buy candle wicks to make
                              them functional. The other issue we had (and perhaps it was because
                              I was young and never tried to shape them) was making
                              them "symmetrical" like actual candles. It was a very fun project.

                              jessica in MN

                              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Sherri Treeby
                              <sherritreeby@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I remember reading that you can use them for making candles (for
                              color). Has anyone tried this?
                              > Sherri
                              > South Dakota
                            • aliteachesart
                              You could use cheap white candles and dip them into the colored wax. I am just thinking here- maybe place a tea light into a muffin liner or cookie cutterthat
                              Message 14 of 14 , Feb 7, 2007
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                                You could use cheap white candles and dip them into the colored wax. I am just thinking
                                here- maybe place a tea light into a muffin liner or cookie cutterthat has been wraped in
                                foil so it won't leak and pour the crayon around it. What about using candy molds to make
                                crayons with nubs? This is more crafty than artie... (but fun I bet!) Ali

                                --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Jessica" <kermit_al@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I vaguely recall making candles with crayons. I believe my mom put
                                > the crayons in an old coffee can and heated them up on a hot plate.
                                > We would mix colors together to create new colors. We took a pencil
                                > and tied a string to it for the wick, and then dipped the wick into
                                > the melted crayons.
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