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Warm Up Exercises Question

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  • Rebecca Aranyi
    Hello everyone! I have been a lurker on this group for a little bit and have enjoyed all the information and websites that have been featured. I have a
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 27, 2007
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      Hello everyone!  I have been a lurker on this group for a little bit and have enjoyed all the information and websites that have been featured.

       

      I have a question –

       

      I am currently student teaching middle school art and have put in a five minute warm up at the beginning of the period.  This, to me, seems to calm the students down from the hallway drama and get them in the mindset of art.  I have been giving them random things to draw and they seem to enjoy it.  Here is the catch – I am running out of fun and random ideas.    

       

      For example, one day last week I used this as a warm up:  Draw a mutant potato that could take over the world.   The sketches that I received were excellent!  They loved it.  Does anyone have any other ideas for warm ups?

       

      Have a creative day,

       

      Becky in NC

      rlaranyi@...

      rlaranyi@...

      rlaranyi@...

      website:   www.twistedfiberarts.com

       

    • Jen Millward
      Rebecca, Have you tried blind contour drawing? I had a teacher who would have us draw each other s portraits as a blind contour and the results were
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 27, 2007
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        Rebecca,

        Have you tried blind contour drawing? I had a teacher who would have us draw each other’s portraits as a blind contour and the results were hysterical!

        Good luck,

        Jen M. in NY

         

        From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Rebecca Aranyi
        Sent: Saturday, January 27, 2007 10:43 AM
        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [art_education] Warm Up Exercises Question

         

        Hello everyone!  I have been a lurker on this group for a little bit and have enjoyed all the information and websites that have been featured.

         

        I have a question –

         

        I am currently student teaching middle school art and have put in a five minute warm up at the beginning of the period.  This, to me, seems to calm the students down from the hallway drama and get them in the mindset of art.  I have been giving them random things to draw and they seem to enjoy it.  Here is the catch – I am running out of fun and random ideas.    

         

        For example, one day last week I used this as a warm up:  Draw a mutant potato that could take over the world.   The sketches that I received were excellent!  They loved it.  Does anyone have any other ideas for warm ups?

         

        Have a creative day,

         

        Becky in NC

        rlaranyi@...

        rlaranyi@...

        rlaranyi@...

        website:   www.twistedfiberarts.com

         

      • wmvanhorn
        Rebecca, my warm-up list is below, some of it borrowed from someone else, some of my own, even a few student contributions. I would love to see your ideas for
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 28, 2007
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          Rebecca, my warm-up list is below, some of it borrowed from someone else, some of my
          own, even a few student contributions. I would love to see your ideas for warmups too!

          William
          www.inmystudio.net

          o Draw an imaginary room
          o Draw yourself as you will look when you are 80 years old (or any other age)
          o Draw a flying frog
          o Draw a clock cooking a meatloaf
          o Draw the monster that hides under your bed.
          o List 10 things the color BLUE (or other color: list color) reminds you of.
          o Draw your greatest fear.
          o Draw things that float.
          o Draw things with wheels.
          o Draw things that roll.
          o Draw things that close.
          o Draw things that come from eggs.
          o Be an ant. Draw what you would see in the cafeteria.
          o If you had a candy bar named after you, what would it look like and what would it be
          called. Draw the candy bar.
          o If you had been a pilgrim, draw what you think you would have looked like.
          o If you were a flower, what kind would you be? Draw a picture of yourself as this
          flower.
          o Express in your drawing, your happiest time that you've had in the past year.
          o Draw something that you are good at doing or playing.
          o If I could be a color, I'd be _______because….
          (Direction: WRITE YOUR ANSWER in WORDS then draw a picture.)
          o Draw a picture of something you'd like to become better at doing.
          o Using any type of line or shape, create a picture with only the 3 primary colors.
          o An alien spaceship has landed in the schoolyard. Draw a picture of it.
          o High in the Himalayan Mountains lives an abominable snowperson. Draw what the
          snowperson looks like.
          o You have made a startling discovery while skin diving. Draw what it is.
          o Have you ever been to a circus? Draw a picture of your favorite act with yourself as
          the ringmaster.
          o Draw a picture of one of your family members at work.
          o Draw a picture of your shoe (or hat.) Draw it again from another view.
          o Draw your hand.
          o Draw a picture of your pet or the pet you would LOVE to have.
          o Fill your page with drawings of bugs, seashells, or something that you collect.
          o Draw a family member or a friend.
          o Draw a picture of yourself as you think you might look in 10 years.
          o Have you ever had a daydream instead of doing your work? Draw a picture of your
          daydream.
          o Draw a picture of your house and yard with a BIG, HUGE, dinosaur in the yard.
          o What is the best story your grandmother or grandfather tells about the olden days?
          Draw a picture of this story.
          o Draw a picture of your favorite (or least favorite) part about school.
          o Draw a picture of your dream car.
          o What does the boogeyman look like?
          o If you could cast a magic spell, what would it be? Draw a picture of it.
          o The famous American Pop artist Andy Warhol said, "Everyone will have at least fifteen
          minutes of fame in a lifetime." Illustrate your 15 minutes of fame.
          o A new musical group has asked you to design a CD COVER for them that illustrate
          their music. Be sure that your design is original and does not use any other group's
          design. Draw this NEW CD cover.
          o Draw a picture of your dream house.
          o Design your own bedroom floor plan.
          o Think of 3 different animals. Draw the head of one, the body of the second, and the
          legs of the third one. Give it a name and write the name under the picture.
          o Draw yourself screaming because you are scared.
          o Draw the silliest thing you ever saw.
          o Draw a monster truck.
          o Draw a spider that nobody has ever seen before.
          o Draw what you would look like if you received a MEDAL at the US OLYMPICS.

          --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Rebecca Aranyi" <miaya_mom@...> wrote:

          > I am currently student teaching middle school art and have put in a five
          > minute warm up at the beginning of the period. This, to me, seems to calm
          > the students down from the hallway drama and get them in the mindset of art.
          > I have been giving them random things to draw and they seem to enjoy it.
          > Here is the catch - I am running out of fun and random ideas.
          >
          >
          >
          > For example, one day last week I used this as a warm up: Draw a mutant
          > potato that could take over the world. The sketches that I received were
          > excellent! They loved it. Does anyone have any other ideas for warm ups?
          >
          >
          >
          > Have a creative day,
          >
          >
          >
          > Becky in NC
          >
          > rlaranyi@...
          >
          > rlaranyi@...
          >
          > rlaranyi@...
          >
          > website: www.twistedfiberarts.com
          >
        • Judith Stenger
          Try this website. Lots of good stuff; ... Peace and Grace Judy
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 28, 2007
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            Try this website.  Lots of good stuff;

            Peace and Grace
            Judy



          • James Cipalla
            I use several power points for my warm-ups. Here s one that uses some ideas from Art Synectics, a great book. Namaste, Jim Cipalla Art Teacher, Northside
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 29, 2007
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              I use several power points for my warm-ups. Here's one that uses some ideas from Art Synectics, a great book.



              Namaste,

              Jim Cipalla

              Art Teacher, Northside Middle School
              Norfolk,Virginia
              Vice President, TVAEA
              JCipalla@...

              "Color is the keyboard, the eyes are the hammers,
              The soul is the piano with many strings.
              The artist is the hand that plays, touching one key or another,
              To cause vibrations in the soul."
              -- Wassily Kandinsky




              >>> "wmvanhorn" <vivalaarte@...> 01/28/07 11:46 AM >>>
              Rebecca, my warm-up list is below, some of it borrowed from someone else, some of my
              own, even a few student contributions. I would love to see your ideas for warmups too!

              William
              www.inmystudio.net

              o Draw an imaginary room
              o Draw yourself as you will look when you are 80 years old (or any other age)
              o Draw a flying frog
              o Draw a clock cooking a meatloaf
              o Draw the monster that hides under your bed.
              o List 10 things the color BLUE (or other color: list color) reminds you of.
              o Draw your greatest fear.
              o Draw things that float.
              o Draw things with wheels.
              o Draw things that roll.
              o Draw things that close.
              o Draw things that come from eggs.
              o Be an ant. Draw what you would see in the cafeteria.
              o If you had a candy bar named after you, what would it look like and what would it be
              called. Draw the candy bar.
              o If you had been a pilgrim, draw what you think you would have looked like.
              o If you were a flower, what kind would you be? Draw a picture of yourself as this
              flower.
              o Express in your drawing, your happiest time that you've had in the past year.
              o Draw something that you are good at doing or playing.
              o If I could be a color, I'd be _______because*.
              (Direction: WRITE YOUR ANSWER in WORDS then draw a picture.)
              o Draw a picture of something you'd like to become better at doing.
              o Using any type of line or shape, create a picture with only the 3 primary colors.
              o An alien spaceship has landed in the schoolyard. Draw a picture of it.
              o High in the Himalayan Mountains lives an abominable snowperson. Draw what the
              snowperson looks like.
              o You have made a startling discovery while skin diving. Draw what it is.
              o Have you ever been to a circus? Draw a picture of your favorite act with yourself as
              the ringmaster.
              o Draw a picture of one of your family members at work.
              o Draw a picture of your shoe (or hat.) Draw it again from another view.
              o Draw your hand.
              o Draw a picture of your pet or the pet you would LOVE to have.
              o Fill your page with drawings of bugs, seashells, or something that you collect.
              o Draw a family member or a friend.
              o Draw a picture of yourself as you think you might look in 10 years.
              o Have you ever had a daydream instead of doing your work? Draw a picture of your
              daydream.
              o Draw a picture of your house and yard with a BIG, HUGE, dinosaur in the yard.
              o What is the best story your grandmother or grandfather tells about the olden days?
              Draw a picture of this story.
              o Draw a picture of your favorite (or least favorite) part about school.
              o Draw a picture of your dream car.
              o What does the boogeyman look like?
              o If you could cast a magic spell, what would it be? Draw a picture of it.
              o The famous American Pop artist Andy Warhol said, "Everyone will have at least fifteen
              minutes of fame in a lifetime." Illustrate your 15 minutes of fame.
              o A new musical group has asked you to design a CD COVER for them that illustrate
              their music. Be sure that your design is original and does not use any other group's
              design. Draw this NEW CD cover.
              o Draw a picture of your dream house.
              o Design your own bedroom floor plan.
              o Think of 3 different animals. Draw the head of one, the body of the second, and the
              legs of the third one. Give it a name and write the name under the picture.
              o Draw yourself screaming because you are scared.
              o Draw the silliest thing you ever saw.
              o Draw a monster truck.
              o Draw a spider that nobody has ever seen before.
              o Draw what you would look like if you received a MEDAL at the US OLYMPICS.

              --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Rebecca Aranyi" <miaya_mom@...> wrote:

              > I am currently student teaching middle school art and have put in a five
              > minute warm up at the beginning of the period. This, to me, seems to calm
              > the students down from the hallway drama and get them in the mindset of art.
              > I have been giving them random things to draw and they seem to enjoy it.
              > Here is the catch - I am running out of fun and random ideas.
              >
              >
              >
              > For example, one day last week I used this as a warm up: Draw a mutant
              > potato that could take over the world. The sketches that I received were
              > excellent! They loved it. Does anyone have any other ideas for warm ups?
              >
              >
              >
              > Have a creative day,
              >
              >
              >
              > Becky in NC
              >
              > rlaranyi@...
              >
              > rlaranyi@...
              >
              > rlaranyi@...
              >
              > website: www.twistedfiberarts.com
              >
            • Cheri Harrell
              Hey William - nice list of warm-up exercises. I already have developed my opening activities for each class, so I think I am going to borrow your ideas for a
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 29, 2007
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                Hey William - nice list of warm-up exercises. I already have developed my opening activities for each class, so I think I am going to borrow your ideas for a "I don't know what to do" jar.
                I have students that get done with projects before everyone else. They can have free-choice art time, but some don't know how to use free time wisely. I am going to put these warmups on slips of paper and put them in a jar...and if a student is not being productive, I can have them pick a strip of paper out of the jar, and they will have to create what is on the slip.


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              • Patricia Knott
                There has been some good discussion about warm-up exercises. I always like to start with what-if questions. What if it got bigger? smaller? bolder? more
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 29, 2007
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                  There has been some good discussion about warm-up exercises.
                  I always like to start with "what-if" questions.
                  What if it got bigger? smaller? bolder? more subtle? ... etc

                  I have another question

                  What are good closure activities?
                  I won't go into now, how I think closure is sometimes a waste of
                  valuable production time. If I'm teaching a skill or technique I see
                  worth in exit questions, but when kids are working and producing over
                  several days, I have to argue with taking more time on top of
                  cleanup time to "close."

                  My district requires closure EVERY DAY. I personally use daily
                  reflection logs.

                  Any creative closures?

                  Patty

                  On Jan 29, 2007, at 7:15 AM, James Cipalla wrote:

                  > I use several power points for my warm-ups. Here's one that uses
                  > some ideas from Art Synectics, a great book.
                  >
                • sross60
                  ... see ... over ... Patty, That s interesting that you are required to have a closure. I can understand why that might be difficult. How long do these
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jan 29, 2007
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                    --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Knott <pknott@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > There has been some good discussion about warm-up exercises.
                    > I always like to start with "what-if" questions.
                    > What if it got bigger? smaller? bolder? more subtle? ... etc
                    >
                    > I have another question
                    >
                    > What are good closure activities?
                    > I won't go into now, how I think closure is sometimes a waste of
                    > valuable production time. If I'm teaching a skill or technique I
                    see
                    > worth in exit questions, but when kids are working and producing
                    over
                    > several days, I have to argue with taking more time on top of
                    > cleanup time to "close."
                    >
                    > My district requires closure EVERY DAY. I personally use daily
                    > reflection logs.
                    >
                    > Any creative closures?
                    >
                    > Patty
                    >
                    > On Jan 29, 2007, at 7:15 AM, James Cipalla wrote:
                    >
                    > > I use several power points for my warm-ups. Here's one that uses
                    > > some ideas from Art Synectics, a great book.
                    > >
                    >
                    Patty,
                    That's interesting that you are required to have a closure. I can
                    understand why that might be difficult. How long do these closures
                    have to be? Maybe just a short discussion about problems they are
                    having or what they plan to do next time they work would be
                    sufficient. Just a thought.
                    Sarah
                  • gabrielalealvega
                    Hello Becky! What I have been doing for my warm ups is to write a quote... any that will make a difference in my students and even myself and I make them draw
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jan 29, 2007
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                      Hello Becky!
                      What I have been doing for my warm ups is to write a quote... any
                      that will make a difference in my students and even myself and I
                      make them draw something out of it... wonderful visual art comes
                      from this quotes! Just don´t let them use too many symbols like
                      hearts and stars or else they will just decorate the quote with too
                      many of them...

                      hope this helps! let me know please if this contribution is a good
                      one!

                      I am also sooooo grateful for all your help¡

                      thanks again!
                      gabriela leal from tampico mexico!


                      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Rebecca Aranyi"
                      <miaya_mom@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hello everyone! I have been a lurker on this group for a little
                      bit and
                      > have enjoyed all the information and websites that have been
                      featured.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I have a question -
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I am currently student teaching middle school art and have put in
                      a five
                      > minute warm up at the beginning of the period. This, to me, seems
                      to calm
                      > the students down from the hallway drama and get them in the
                      mindset of art.
                      > I have been giving them random things to draw and they seem to
                      enjoy it.
                      > Here is the catch - I am running out of fun and random ideas.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > For example, one day last week I used this as a warm up: Draw a
                      mutant
                      > potato that could take over the world. The sketches that I
                      received were
                      > excellent! They loved it. Does anyone have any other ideas for
                      warm ups?
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Have a creative day,
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Becky in NC
                      >
                      > rlaranyi@...
                      >
                      > rlaranyi@...
                      >
                      > rlaranyi@...
                      >
                      > website: www.twistedfiberarts.com
                      >
                    • Sarah Coullard
                      Re: Closures You could try a mini art critique. Have students show their work and talk about their work. I did this with 6th grade and they really enjoyed
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jan 31, 2007
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                          Re: Closures
                         
                        You could try a mini "art critique."  Have students show their work and talk about their work.  I did this with 6th grade and they really enjoyed it.  It only took 5-10 minutes.  It really helped them to take pride in their work.  I think it could easily be done with younger grades as well.
                      • Linda24502@aol.com
                        ok thanks very much.
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jan 31, 2007
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                          ok thanks very much.
                        • wmvanhorn
                          This may work as a closure sometimes: I have a powerpoint with a wide collection of artwork. When I find myself with some free time and not wanting to start
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jan 3, 2008
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                            This may work as a closure sometimes:

                            I have a powerpoint with a wide collection of artwork. When I find myself with some free
                            time and not wanting to start the next project until the next day, I'll show some slides and
                            have the students tell me what they see. At first, I get them to just describe the artwork,
                            then they can talk about what they think the art means, with their descriptions as
                            evidence. Students usually enjoy this activity and actually get the gist of the work even
                            when they do not know the artist or the historical background to it.

                            William Van Horn


                            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "sross60" <sross60@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Knott <pknott@>
                            > wrote:
                            > >
                            > > There has been some good discussion about warm-up exercises.
                            > > I always like to start with "what-if" questions.
                            > > What if it got bigger? smaller? bolder? more subtle? ... etc
                            > >
                            > > I have another question
                            > >
                            > > What are good closure activities?
                            > > I won't go into now, how I think closure is sometimes a waste of
                            > > valuable production time. If I'm teaching a skill or technique I
                            > see
                            > > worth in exit questions, but when kids are working and producing
                            > over
                            > > several days, I have to argue with taking more time on top of
                            > > cleanup time to "close."
                            > >
                            > > My district requires closure EVERY DAY. I personally use daily
                            > > reflection logs.
                            > >
                            > > Any creative closures?
                            > >
                            > > Patty
                            > >
                            > > On Jan 29, 2007, at 7:15 AM, James Cipalla wrote:
                            > >
                            > > > I use several power points for my warm-ups. Here's one that uses
                            > > > some ideas from Art Synectics, a great book.
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > Patty,
                            > That's interesting that you are required to have a closure. I can
                            > understand why that might be difficult. How long do these closures
                            > have to be? Maybe just a short discussion about problems they are
                            > having or what they plan to do next time they work would be
                            > sufficient. Just a thought.
                            > Sarah
                            >
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