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Re:question about art teacher training... - Julie

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  • Ken Rohrer
    Julie, You ve asked a loaded question. There are some teachers who criticize this method. Typically this method is used to teach the super-realism technique.
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 5, 2006
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      Julie,

      You've asked a loaded question. There are some
      teachers who criticize this method. Typically this
      method is used to teach the super-realism technique.
      Where it becomes controversial is if it is used as a
      final art product for submission to art competitions
      such as Scholastic Art contests held across the U.S.
      You can read a comment about this in the IAD pet
      peeves section at
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/peeves/peeves6.html.
      (Look at number 15)

      One of the reasons for this is it doesn't teach
      creativity or produce art with "feeling." Personally I
      think it has it's place when students are first
      learning realism, but they ideally should learn to
      draw realism without a grid. They then learn to really
      "look" at things around them when not using the grid
      system. If they linger on a grid, they keep using it
      as a crutch. That's why it's good for them to move
      beyond the grid quickly.

      That's where the criticism comes in with the
      Scholastic Arts competition. Frequently when looking
      at these pictures, people think, "My, isn't that a
      good likeness of a ____." However, they usually don't
      think, "I wonder what that artist is saying about
      ____?" Or, "Look at the use of color and composition
      the artist used to produce a feeling of ______."
      Nothing is wrong with realism or super-realism. The
      problem is what does the art look like beyond realism?
      What does it say and how does it make you feel?

      There is a book series that is popular with many art
      teachers called "Drawing on the Right Side of the
      Brain." You can find them on IAD on
      http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/links/toolbox/booksdrawing.html.
      This book really works and teaches students (and
      adults) to use the creative part of the brain to
      produce art.

      If you want to try the method you described, there is
      nothing wrong with it as long as you move them beyond
      this system. There are many books relating to this.
      The "How to Draw..." books frequently do this. You can
      find an example of this type of book here:

      http://tinyurl.com/y66533

      Ken Rohrer

      ------------------
      littleredhenschool@...
      Mon Dec 4, 2006 10:42 am (PST)
      That is a good page :-) But I don't think it addresses
      these different approaches for teaching the Production
      of art that I'm trying to figure out...

      If what I was taught with (many moons ago ;-) was a
      kind of "structured" Choice-based approach... what
      would you call the approach where everyone does the
      same project, following the directions.. . and learns
      to draw by copying someone else's symbol step-be-step,
      or by grid-copying a complete drawing? (not just as a
      tool to enlarge a drawing for, say , a mural)

      And is this a common art teaching method being taught
      to art teachers today?

      -julie
      HomeschoolDiner. com




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    • Marsha Carman
      I think the grid can be used in combination with different media as long as you are concentrating on the media rather than drawing. I would much rather see an
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 6, 2006
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        I think the grid can be used in combination with different media as long as
        you are concentrating on the media rather than drawing. I would much rather
        see an imperfect drawing done on ones own than a perfect grid drawing
        anyday. This too goes back to "creating" which I think is very important in
        any artwork. Drawings hold much more interest when the artists personality
        is seen in the artwork.



        Marsha

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