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Re: Quality of work

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  • wanda smith
    Many times the age of the student has a lot to do with the quality too. I teach 8th and 9th graders and they are all about instant satisfaction. I really have
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 3, 2006
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      Many times the age of the student has a lot to do with the quality
      too. I teach 8th and 9th graders and they are all about instant
      satisfaction. I really have to stress the importance of neatness and
      craftsmanship to them especially the guys. They come to us from the
      middle school where they have art once a week but do NOT receive a
      grade for their work, an enrichment class, so they think they have to
      rush to get things finished. It takes me several months to get
      through to them and some never get it. I use the following grading
      rubric:
      20 points each:
      following directins
      creativity/orginality
      working to potential
      staying on task
      turning in on time(if turned in late due to wasting time 20 points
      deducted)
      (if absent or a meticulous worker I still count off for lateness but
      adjust accordingly)
      Wanda




      --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "pent19" <pent19@...> wrote:
      >
      > How about making teacher samples and showing the steps to get there.
      > Students make simply not know how to make quality work or what
      > craftsmanship is. I just finished a clay project with Studio
      students
      > and focused on craftsmanship. I showed them how to blend and smooth
      > and how to get rid of "clay boogers" that are left behind after
      > carving into the surface. I let them know that a sharp edge could
      hurt
      > someone where as a beveled edge looks better and won't hurt anyone.
      > Same could go for fingerprints and smudges, dog-eared corners on
      work.
      > I also include craftsmanship/quality when grading. Having the
      > aforementioned will affect to overall grade, just like an artwork in
      > the musuem.
      > Michele NY
      >
      > --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "tmwillis72" <tmwillis72@>
      wrote:
      > >
      > > I have noticed that my students work doesn't have the quality or
      > > craftsmanship I would like. I am at a loss on how to get them to
      > > produce better work. They just scribble and rush through.
      > >
      > > Is anyone having the same experience.
      > >
      > > Thanks for your help.
      > >
      > > Tammy
      > >
      >
    • Kristi Gilleland
      YES! I am having trouble with my son s grammar in the movies & animations and even labeled drawings that he is making. Some of his art is very sloppy too- I
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 3, 2006
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        YES!
         
        I am having trouble with my son's grammar in the movies & animations and even labeled drawings that he is making.  Some of his art is very sloppy too- I KNOW he can do better.
         
        Some of it, I think, will have to come as he gets more comfortable with his technical & fine motor skills, but the rest I think is going to have to come from my insistence and nagging.
         
        The thing that I think is important though, for both of us, is that he doesn't let sloppiness become a habit. 
         
        -K.


        From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of tmwillis72
        Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 8:43 AM
        To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [art_education] Quality of work

        I have noticed that my students work doesn't have the quality or
        craftsmanship I would like. I am at a loss on how to get them to
        produce better work. They just scribble and rush through.

        Is anyone having the same experience.

        Thanks for your help.

        Tammy

      • Kristi Gilleland
        Larry - that s some wonderful sentiments - and I totally agree with everything you ve said. You sound like a wonderful teacher. :) -Kristi _____ From:
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 3, 2006
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          Larry - that's some wonderful sentiments - and I totally agree with everything you've said.
          You sound like a wonderful teacher.  :)
          -Kristi


          From: art_education@yahoogroups.com [mailto:art_education@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LarrySeiler
          Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 9:04 AM
          To: art_education@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [art_education] Re:Quality of work

          sometimes it can certainly be discouraging. ..
          Teaching K-12 you see ages of kids and classes where one group working hard
          will seem in a couple years to apparently care less. Talking to the
          classroom/homeroom teacher sometimes helps you beat up on yourself a bit
          less. Sometimes developing interests in boy/girl things are going
          on...sports, the playground, at home.

          I think life offers many distractions and confusing messages, and we compete
          with McWorld to place emphasis that something can matter so much as to
          mandate our attention.

          I push...I mentor by example as an artist...but I am also human, and have
          been discouraged of late for other reasons.

          I saw from CBS news this past week that statistically right now 1 out of 32
          adults in America is in prison, on parole, or probation. Then we ended the
          week with an inservice on "Carefrontation" ...one more strategy on getting a
          handle on classroom management. We see things that are falling apart in
          society, but are as teachers expected to fix in the classroom.

          Its about caring, and getting kids to care...but I see two problems...both
          can be put forth by acronyms...

          one is...
          "kids don't care what you know until they know you care"

          and two...
          "the heart of the problem, is the problem of the heart"

          I see that the growing "Golden Rule" today for many teens is- "its not
          wrong if you don't get caught"

          Society seems to reward this idea. Parents are role modeling it...and
          somewhere in there we are attempting to put emphasis that bringing a right
          attitude (or the one we want) is important when its art making time. The
          rest of the world is going many different directions, "H__ in a hand basket"
          as they say...but in my room...HERE is what matters!!!

          It is frustrating isn't it!

          Kids that ask if they can do the simplest easiest thing to do...("will this
          be easy?") and my response which throws them off guard is...."yeah. ..you're
          right, too easy! I wouldn't do it either!" or...in wanting to be done with
          a work..."Is this good enough?" and I respond, "sure...no problem. Here is
          your grade." to their..."Whhhaaaaaa t? ...you're giving me a D grade?"
          ....and I then end with, "sure, isn't a D...(pause for emphasis) GOOD
          ENOUGH?"

          Hang in there...model excellence. Find joy in those students that are
          demonstrating growth, positive change. Keep at it!

          Larry

        • Becky Thornton
          When I first started teaching, over thirty years ago, the students were doing some mediocre work and Iwould try to push them...but to no avail. Well I had
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 3, 2006
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            When I first started teaching, over thirty years ago, the students were doing some mediocre work and Iwould try to push them...but to no avail.  Well I had nine weeks classesand a couple of groups of all year classes.  At the New Year, maybe I'm a slow learner, new kids came anad just wowed me with their work and work ethic.  My expectations had been too low!  I thought, "poor babies, this is just the best they can do!"  After one project everyone improved tremendously!  I felt so bad for letting them slide!
            Becky
          • ebonygirlp@aol.com
            I have that problem as well with students rushing to get done. A blessed few will give you a little of what you are looking for. Some students take art only
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 3, 2006
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              I have that problem as well with students rushing to get done. A blessed few will give you a little of what you are looking for. Some students take art only because it is required and it is a challenge to get them really involved. When I did an activity on creating their own comic book for the 5th 6th & 7th grade students showed a lot of interest.
               
              Edna J. Patterson-Petty

              When words are too deep, try art therapy

              http://fabricswork.com
            • piketeach@aol.com
              Rubics, Rubrics,Rubrics; you can find many through this site and its links. Make them read them and make decisions on their own (you don t have to agree). It
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 4, 2006
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                Rubics, Rubrics,Rubrics; you can find many through this site and its links.  Make them read them and make decisions on their own (you don't have to agree). It takes a whole bunch of time but it's worthwhile. You'll usually find that they are much harder on themselves than you'll ever be.
                 
                Another option is to work on a point system rather than a letter grade.  A  2 out of 10 is a lot worse than an "F", the key is to allow them to redo the assignment on ther own time to raise their grade.
                 
                Terry
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