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Metalsmithing - question

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  • Kristi Gilleland
    My son has been wanting to learn to make jewelry - so I was very appreciative of the jewelry 101 thread. He s been making me brooches with the soldering gun
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 1, 2006
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      My son has been wanting to learn to make jewelry - so I was very appreciative of the jewelry 101 thread.  He's been making me brooches with the soldering gun and some pin backs.
       
      I've bookmarked the book, workbook and video on metalsmithing.

      My question is - I homeschool, and do you guys with experience with these materials think they are feasible for homeschooling?  By that, they don't require super huge or expensive setups do they?  Space is getting to be the biggest issue here.
       
      Also, about what grade levels are they geared for?
       
      My son is 10 but he's advanced - really he is just really lopsided to be honest.  He's really advanced in art & science though.  He is capable of doing instructional books geared towards adults & has done several technical ones, but he doesn't always enjoy the dryness and that slows him down.
       
      -Kristi 

    • littleredhenschool
      My ds12 enjoys working with metal, too. (another homeschool mom here ;-) We have found classes at nearby art museums in both silver- clay and fused glass that
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 1, 2006
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        My ds12 enjoys working with metal, too. (another homeschool mom
        here ;-) We have found classes at nearby art museums in both silver-
        clay and fused glass that my ds has enjoyed for the past 3 years.

        He really liked working with the silver-clay medium that has
        recently become popular with jewelry-makers. It is a clay-like
        material containing silver dust -- you shape it like clay (into
        medallions, rings, slides, whatever) then it is fired in a kiln.
        The "clay" burns off and the silver is left...
        makes very nice high-quality jewelry (depending on the initial
        design, of course ;-) and I have seen a lot of it for sale in
        department stores and TJ Maxx. Here the classes run about $75
        dollars and you get a small chunk of the clay to work with (enough
        for a small medallion and matching earrings or just a single ring).


        The fused glass was another fun, colorful option -- two different
        teachers have let him into the classes, even though they were listed
        as adult classes. Not metal, I know, but very substantial results.


        What my ds12 really wants to do is smith a sword... try finding
        resources for THAT project ;-)))

        -julie
        HomeschoolDiner.com
        Another option

        I missed the metal smithing links -- could you please send me them
        offline? TIA :-)



        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Kristi Gilleland" <ebay@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > My son has been wanting to learn to make jewelry - so I was very
        > appreciative of the jewelry 101 thread. He's been making me
        brooches with
        > the soldering gun and some pin backs.
        >
        > I've bookmarked the book, workbook and video on metalsmithing.
        >
        > My question is - I homeschool, and do you guys with experience
        with these
        > materials think they are feasible for homeschooling? By that,
        they don't
        > require super huge or expensive setups do they? Space is getting
        to be the
        > biggest issue here.
        >
        > Also, about what grade levels are they geared for?
        >
        > My son is 10 but he's advanced - really he is just really lopsided
        to be
        > honest. He's really advanced in art & science though. He is
        capable of
        > doing instructional books geared towards adults & has done several
        technical
        > ones, but he doesn't always enjoy the dryness and that slows him
        down.
        >
        > -Kristi
        > <http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?
        s=97359714/grpId=3520770/grpspId=1705019151/msgId
        > =11421/stime=1162055619/nc1=3848640/nc2=4025321/nc3=3848533>
        >
      • Richard Lee
        coming out of lurkdom here. i homeschool my 14yoson and he too loves metal. we have not tried any jewelry-making, but believe it or not we did find a
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 2, 2006
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          coming out of lurkdom here. i homeschool my 14yoson and he too loves metal. we have not tried any jewelry-making, but believe it or not we did find a knifesmith! so he is making a knifeblade, which isn't quite a sword, which is what he really would love to do, but its close. if you live near a city, you might be able to find a smithing organization that could point you toward a teacher. try typing in "blacksmith organization" or "bladesmithing organizations" and you just might be able to come up with something. we live near houston and i was amazed that there is a fairly large and active group in the area.
          its worth a try anyway..
          good luck!
          paula
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2006 11:00 PM
          Subject: [art_education] Re: Metalsmithing - question

          My ds12 enjoys working with metal, too. (another homeschool mom
          here ;-) We have found classes at nearby art museums in both silver-
          clay and fused glass that my ds has enjoyed for the past 3 years.

          He really liked working with the silver-clay medium that has
          recently become popular with jewelry-makers. It is a clay-like
          material containing silver dust -- you shape it like clay (into
          medallions, rings, slides, whatever) then it is fired in a kiln.
          The "clay" burns off and the silver is left...
          makes very nice high-quality jewelry (depending on the initial
          design, of course ;-) and I have seen a lot of it for sale in
          department stores and TJ Maxx. Here the classes run about $75
          dollars and you get a small chunk of the clay to work with (enough
          for a small medallion and matching earrings or just a single ring).

          The fused glass was another fun, colorful option -- two different
          teachers have let him into the classes, even though they were listed
          as adult classes. Not metal, I know, but very substantial results.

          What my ds12 really wants to do is smith a sword... try finding
          resources for THAT project ;-)))

          -julie
          HomeschoolDiner. com
          Another option

          I missed the metal smithing links -- could you please send me them
          offline? TIA :-)

          --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, "Kristi Gilleland" <ebay@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > My son has been wanting to learn to make jewelry - so I was very
          > appreciative of the jewelry 101 thread. He's been making me
          brooches with
          > the soldering gun and some pin backs.
          >
          > I've bookmarked the book, workbook and video on metalsmithing.
          >
          > My question is - I homeschool, and do you guys with experience
          with these
          > materials think they are feasible for homeschooling? By that,
          they don't
          > require super huge or expensive setups do they? Space is getting
          to be the
          > biggest issue here.
          >
          > Also, about what grade levels are they geared for?
          >
          > My son is 10 but he's advanced - really he is just really lopsided
          to be
          > honest. He's really advanced in art & science though. He is
          capable of
          > doing instructional books geared towards adults & has done several
          technical
          > ones, but he doesn't always enjoy the dryness and that slows him
          down.
          >
          > -Kristi
          > <http://geo.yahoo. com/serv?
          s=97359714/grpId= 3520770/grpspId= 1705019151/ msgId
          > =11421/stime= 1162055619/ nc1=3848640/ nc2=4025321/ nc3=3848533>
          >

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