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Re: [art_education] glass paint?

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  • Mikel Lee
    I have used tube acrylic and latex with success. I have used tempera also, but it always flaked off. You can also buy vinyl letters and save yourself the
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 7 9:18 AM
      I have used tube acrylic and latex with success. I
      have used tempera also, but it always flaked off. You
      can also buy vinyl letters and save yourself the
      trouble. - Mikel



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    • Paul Joseph Schleitwiler, FCM
      ... ... I have to paint the word Office on a glass panel above the school office door and was wondering what kind of paint I could use. Would acrylic work?
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 7 12:26 PM
        --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, Kelli Wilke <kdenne14@...> wrote:
        " ... I have to paint the word "Office" on a glass panel above the
        school office door and was wondering what kind of paint I could use.
        Would acrylic work? I don't want to go out and buy glass paint if I
        have something already that would work.
        Any ideas?"
        Kelli Wilke

        A key question is how often and with what will the glass panel be
        cleaned? The traditional medium for lettering on glass has been enamel
        for resistance to solvents and abrasion. However, nothing lasts forever.
        If the panel can be cleaned adequately with only a damp cloth, acrylic
        will be fine. Alcohol, which is in most commercial glass cleaners,
        will soften the acrylic. Flodding the panel with water and soap will
        separate the acrylic from the glass. Enamel will wear well when
        cleaned with vinegar, water and a squeegee. The best, for long term
        wear, is enamel over etched glass which provides some tooth for the
        paint to cling to.
        Whatever you use, the glass must be thoroughly cleaned of dirt and
        grease and have no residue of solvents remaining when it is dry,
        before you begin painting.
        You might use a stencil for the first pass, then touch it up with auto
        detailing brushes and the medium you choose.
        You might also print on a sheet of mylar or PVA and apply that to the
        panel, like the window decorations you can buy. That could be peeled
        off when cleaning the panel, then reapplied.
        Isn't it wonderful the way schools save money by not using a
        professional service for such tasks that teachers can be roped into?
        Just be glad they haven't drafted you to build the office furniture.
        You might get a quote from a local sign painter to compare with the
        cost of buying the materials for such a simple, one time use.
        Que Dios te bendiga de siempre y de todas maneras,
        Paul
      • Susan Michael
        What about heat setting the paint. I have used tube acrylic and latex with success. I have used tempera also, but it always flaked off. You can also buy vinyl
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 7 7:40 PM
          What about heat setting the paint.

          I have used tube acrylic and latex with success. I
          have used tempera also, but it always flaked off. You
          can also buy vinyl letters and save yourself the
          trouble. - Mikel

          .
        • Paul Joseph Schleitwiler, FCM
          ... wrote: What about heat setting the paint. ... Heat setting paints are either industrial coatings designed to be baked on or the new
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 8 11:19 AM
            --- In art_education@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Michael"
            <chemicalmango@...> wrote:
            "What about heat setting the paint. ... "

            Heat setting paints are either industrial coatings designed to be
            baked on or the new artists' oil paints that remain fluid until heated
            with a radiant heater or hair dryer. The latter paints will be easily
            abraded by normal cleaning methods. The former would require removing
            the glass panel from its location to paint and bake before
            replacement. The industrial coatings would certainly give long wear,
            but the expense and effort are probably not worth it for this project.
            Here is a url for leads to sign painters and sign paint:
            http://www.signsearch.com/powersearchresults.cfm?searchtype=99b&andor=1&powersearch=glass%20sign%20paint
            If that breaks in transmission, go to
            http://www.signsearch.com/
            and enter "glass sign paint" in their search box.
            "Glass lettering paint" refers to a class of products for temporary
            use on, primarily, auto windshields or store windows. It is meant to
            be easily removeable. (This would be a good material for decorating
            school room windows; e.g. a project where the students create
            something for a special occasion, like parent-teacher conferences.)
            Dieu vous bénit toujours, toutes façons,
            Paul
          • mmcarman109
            You can get a sign company to make the letter to rub on, it is not expensive and very professional.
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 8 11:39 AM
              You can get a sign company to make the letter to rub on, it is not
              expensive and very professional.
              >
            • Kelli Wilke
              Thanks for the help with the painting on glass. I just used acrylic and it worked great. I am pretty lucky because my school district hired me instead of an
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 8 8:10 PM
                Thanks for the help with the painting on glass.  I just used acrylic and it worked great.  I am pretty lucky because my school district hired me instead of an outside professional.  I don't get used and abused like some art teachers do. 
                Thanks again,
                Kelli Wilke

                "Paul Joseph Schleitwiler, FCM" <pjschleitwilerfcm@...> wrote:
                --- In art_education@ yahoogroups. com, "Susan Michael"
                <chemicalmango@ ...> wrote:
                "What about heat setting the paint. ... "

                Heat setting paints are either industrial coatings designed to be
                baked on or the new artists' oil paints that remain fluid until heated
                with a radiant heater or hair dryer. The latter paints will be easily
                abraded by normal cleaning methods. The former would require removing
                the glass panel from its location to paint and bake before
                replacement. The industrial coatings would certainly give long wear,
                but the expense and effort are probably not worth it for this project.
                Here is a url for leads to sign painters and sign paint:
                http://www.signsear ch.com/powersear chresults. cfm?searchtype= 99b&andor= 1&powersearch= glass%20sign% 20paint
                If that breaks in transmission, go to
                http://www.signsear ch.com/
                and enter "glass sign paint" in their search box.
                "Glass lettering paint" refers to a class of products for temporary
                use on, primarily, auto windshields or store windows. It is meant to
                be easily removeable. (This would be a good material for decorating
                school room windows; e.g. a project where the students create
                something for a special occasion, like parent-teacher conferences. )
                Dieu vous bénit toujours, toutes façons,
                Paul



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