Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Reply to 'Am I the only one...'

Expand Messages
  • Farhana Sultana
    Dear Mr. Chand, I believe there are many different statistics out there, but the common one I have come across has been that 20% of the tubewells are
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 21, 2009
      Dear Mr. Chand,

      I believe there are many different statistics out there, but the common one
      I have come across has been that 20% of the tubewells are contaminated with
      arsenic (at the national level). Of course this aggregate figure masks the
      enormous spatial heterogeneity, since many places have 100% contamination
      while other places may have a few wells that are unsafe. These figures also
      need to be revised to reflect the fact that many new-installed tubewells
      (since the national screening) may not be tested.

      Regarding the concern you have about the huge amount of funding going into
      this problem, with little outcome, is perhaps shared by many people. I don't
      have an answer as to how to solve the problem, but it is disconcerting that
      after the years of projects, funds, experts, etc. working on the arsenic
      situation, there continues to be millions who are suffering.


      Best,

      Dr. Farhana Sultana


      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Farhana Sultana, Ph.D.
      Assistant Professor of Geography
      Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
      Syracuse University
      Syracuse, NY 13244, USA
      Email: sultanaf@...
      Website: <http://www1.maxwell.syr.edu/faculty/sultana.aspx>
      http://www1.maxwell.syr.edu/faculty/sultana.aspx

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    • NC DAS
      Dear All I agree with Mr Chand s comments on actions taken by varuios organisations to tackle the arsenic crisis in Bangladesh and West Bengal. The steps
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 21, 2009
        Dear All

        I agree with Mr Chand's comments on actions taken by varuios organisations to tackle the arsenic crisis in Bangladesh and West Bengal. The steps taken so far to identify and to solve such catastrophe were always questionable. This is fact that even after spending millions of $ for aresinic decontamination from drinking water supply source, the longterm sustainable success rate is not mentionable at all. I strongly feel that a more scietific and pragmatic setps need to be taken to stop arsenic crisis. I am planning to visit Bangladesh at the end of this year. I like to share my experience on this issue with the people/groups who are interested on arsenic crisis in Bnagldesh.

        Thanks and regards

        Dr N Das
        Free -lance environmental consultant
        Sydney
        Australia
      • BINOD KHAITAN
        Dear Vinay I refer to your desperation ..... The solution is to re-start using pond water as the source of SAFE drinking water both in Bangladesh & West Bengal
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 22, 2009
          Dear Vinay

          I refer to your desperation ..... The solution is to re-start using pond water as the source of SAFE drinking water both in Bangladesh & West Bengal India where arsenic is a great problem. PONDs are being mistreated and forgotten. Ponds were at one time revered as the source of saving LIFE and were treated with utmost care.

          Further, I feel soak pit method to re-charge under ground water is a must and must be given top priority.
          Warmest Rotary wishes
          Always
          Keep
          Smiling!

          PP BINOD KHAITAN
          Rotary Club of Central Calcutta Visit : <www.rccentralcal.org>
          RI District 3291 Visit : <www.rotary3291.org.in>
          Phone : (91-33) 2461 4474 Mobile : (91) 93310 11538
          * Regional Vice Chairman - RLI South Asia (India Nepal & Sri Lanka)
          Visit : <www.rotaryleadershipinstitute.org>
          * Trustee Secretary - Eastern India Rotary Welfare Trust
          * HANDS across the Sea - Project Specialist Community Development -
          Standard of Living
          * 2003/04 & 2005/06 DGSC - District TRF Grants Sub-committee Chair
          * 2006/07 Dist.Advisor - TRF Alumini Committee & RLI Committee
          * 2007/08 - AG TRF Grants
          * 2008/09 - AG International Service II
          "Rotary is an organization of business and professional persons united worldwide who provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical standards in all vocations and help build goodwill and peace in the world."
        • Richard Wilson
          [Re: BINOD KHAITAN Reply to am I the only one m shown beloo] BUT You MUST be very careful about proper sanitation. You must filter pond water properly. Th
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 7, 2009
            [Re: BINOD KHAITAN Reply to "am I the only one"m shown beloo]

            BUT

            You MUST be very careful about proper sanitation.

            You must filter pond water properly.

            Th reason for going to tube wells in the first place was to avoid bateria.

            DO NOT go back to a bacteria loaded pond water.

            Dick Wilson

            BINOD KHAITAN wrote:
            >
            >
            > Dear Vinay
            >
            > I refer to your desperation ..... The solution is to re-start using
            > pond water as the source of SAFE drinking water both in Bangladesh &
            > West Bengal India where arsenic is a great problem. PONDs are being
            > mistreated and forgotten. Ponds were at one time revered as the source
            > of saving LIFE and were treated with utmost care.
            >
            > Further, I feel soak pit method to re-charge under ground water is a
            > must and must be given top priority.
            > Warmest Rotary wishes
            > Always
            > Keep
            > Smiling!
            >
            > PP BINOD KHAITAN
            > Rotary Club of Central Calcutta Visit : <www.rccentralcal.org>
            > RI District 3291 Visit : <www.rotary3291.org.in>
            > Phone : (91-33) 2461 4474 Mobile : (91) 93310 11538
            > * Regional Vice Chairman - RLI South Asia (India Nepal & Sri Lanka)
            > Visit : <www.rotaryleadershipinstitute.org>
            > * Trustee Secretary - Eastern India Rotary Welfare Trust
            > * HANDS across the Sea - Project Specialist Community Development -
            > Standard of Living
            > * 2003/04 & 2005/06 DGSC - District TRF Grants Sub-committee Chair
            > * 2006/07 Dist.Advisor - TRF Alumini Committee & RLI Committee
            > * 2007/08 - AG TRF Grants
            > * 2008/09 - AG International Service II
            > "Rotary is an organization of business and professional persons united
            > worldwide who provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical
            > standards in all vocations and help build goodwill and peace in the
            > world."
            >
            >
          • Jurgen Tummler
            Dear All, certainly arsenic contents in groundwater are a threat in South and South-East Asia; nevertheless, they occur bound to known geological structures /
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 7, 2009
              Dear All,

              certainly arsenic contents in groundwater are a threat in South and South-East Asia; nevertheless, they occur bound to known geological structures / settings.

              Instead falling back into schemes from the pre-colonial past, when the Indian / South Asian was a mere 4th to what it is today, I would suggest analyzing how the problem could be dealt with. Pond water is not the solution, not for today and even more so not for tomorrow. There are means of getting arsenic and iron out of drinking water using aeration, convenient models and types have been developed in the wake of the Tsunami in North Sumatra (Medan, i.e.) with the Indonesian water provider and the German Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR) - that's one side. the other is identifying suitable areas for ground water extraction in arsenic-free areas. This is well-established geological and hydrogeological field and laboratory work, and it can be done by the established and existing services - they would just have to pick up the issue and start working on it.

              Let's go ahead, not back into the dark ages.

              Regards,

              Jürgen Tümmler

              Jürgen Tümmler
              Regional Water and Sanitation Sector Expert

              Regional Support Office South Asia
              Directorate General for Humanitarian Aid - ECHO
              European Commission

              C-384 Defence Colony, New Delhi - 110024, India
              phone: +91 11 2433 6311 (extension 117)
              fax: +91 11 4656 8241
              mobile: +91 9871 897 579
              email: rwc@... <mailto:rwc@...>
              website: http://ec.europa.eu/echo <http://ec.europa.eu/echo>
              ECHO WatSan Review: http://ec.europa.eu/comm/echo/evaluation/watsan2005.htm

              "This e-mail message does not constitute a formal communication and does not necessarily represent the official position of the Commission"
              "Ce message électronique n'est pas une communication formelle et ne représente pas nécessairement la position officielle de la Commission"
            • BINOD KHAITAN
              Dear Dick It is unfortunate that Drinking Water PONDS & WELLS, which were treated very sacred like GODS & GODDESSES in this part of the world, were & are
              Message 6 of 16 , Oct 7, 2009
                Dear Dick
                It is unfortunate that Drinking Water PONDS & WELLS, which were treated very sacred like GODS & GODDESSES in this part of the world, were & are ignored & not cared for. This concept needs to be re- thought to humanity and special the future generation ... the youth. This is a must, if we really do seriously want to circumvent the predicated water and war for WATER !Warmest Rotary wishes
                Always
                Keep
                Smiling!

                PP BINOD KHAITAN
                Rotary Club of Central Calcutta Visit : <www.rccentralcal.org>
                RI District 3291 Visit : <www.rotary3291.org.in>
                Phone : (91-33) 2461 4474 Mobile : (91) 93310 11538
                * Regional Vice Chairman - RLI South Asia (India Nepal & Sri Lanka)
                Visit : <www.rotaryleadershipinstitute.org>
                * Trustee Secretary - Eastern India Rotary Welfare Trust
                * HANDS across the Sea - Project Specialist Community Development -
                Standard of Living
                "Rotary is an organization of business and professional persons united worldwide who provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical standards in all vocations and help build goodwill and peace in the world."
              • BINOD KHAITAN
                Dear Jurgen I am NOT an expert like yourself but as a lay man, I do fear that the under ground water supply has a limit ? The way it is being extracted and
                Message 7 of 16 , Oct 7, 2009
                  Dear Jurgen

                  I am NOT an expert like yourself but as a lay man, I do fear that the under ground water supply has a limit ? The way it is being extracted and wasted will certainly lead to a WAR as predicted.

                  In the 1950s the underground water levels in the city of Kolkata, West Bengal was hardly 5 feet. In the last 50 years the under ground water level has depleted and the water level is down to 50 feet ? ? The cause ... mass extraction of water through Tubewells. The city of Kolkata must go back to using River water after being filtered & treated. It is a fact that buildings in the city are sinking ... I attribute this to the massive extraction of under ground water.

                  Fortunately, the Govt has installed schemes to Filter and Treatment river water and supply the same to the people in the vast area affected due to Arsenic in District of South 24 Parganas, West Bengal. Drinking water from tubewells in this area is down to 1000 feet ! ! This is really alarming ? ?

                  Rain water harvesting (PONDS) and recharge under ground water is a must for survival of the future generations. Through Rotary my Club has taken such projects. Could I tap your expertise on this subject ?

                  I plan to go to Delhi for a day on Tuesday 13th morning. Would it be possible to meet you ? ? Wednesday 14th morning would be most suitable for me as i take a early afternoon return flight. I look forward to your confirmation.
                  Warmest Rotary wishes
                  (¨`•.•´¨) Always
                  `•.¸(¨`•.•´¨) Keep
                  (¨`•.•´¨)¸.• Smiling!
                  `•.¸.•´
                  PP BINOD KHAITAN
                  Rotary Club of Central Calcutta Visit : <www.rccentralcal.org>
                  RI District 3291 Visit : <www.rotary3291.org.in>
                  Phone : (91-33) 2461 4474 Mobile : (91) 93310 11538
                  * Regional Vice Chairman - RLI South Asia (India Nepal & Sri Lanka)
                  Visit : <www.rotaryleadershipinstitute.org>
                  * Trustee Secretary - Eastern India Rotary Welfare Trust
                  * HANDS across the Sea - Project Specialist Community Development -
                  Standard of Living
                  "Rotary is an organization of business and professional persons united worldwide who provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical standards in all vocations and help build goodwill and peace in the world."




                  ________________________________
                  From: Jurgen Tummler <rwc@...>
                  To: Richard Wilson <wilson5@...>; BINOD KHAITAN <binodkay@...>
                  Cc: Arsenic Group <arsenic-crisis@yahoogroups.com>; Shakawat Arsenic 7230 USA <shaka66@...>
                  Sent: Thu, 8 October, 2009 9:03:15 AM
                  Subject: RE: [arsenic-crisis] More in the thread: 'Am I the only one...'


                  Dear All,

                  certainly arsenic contents in groundwater are a threat in
                  South and South-East Asia; nevertheless, they occur bound to known geological
                  structures / settings.

                  Instead falling back into schemes from the pre-colonial
                  past, when the Indian / South Asian was a mere 4th to what it is today, I would
                  suggest analyzing how the problem could be dealt with. Pond water is not the
                  solution, not for today and even more so not for tomorrow. There are means of
                  getting arsenic and iron out of drinking water using aeration, convenient models
                  and types have been developed in the wake of the Tsunami in North Sumatra
                  (Medan, i.e.) with the Indonesian water provider and the German Bundesanstalt
                  für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR) - that's one side. the other is
                  identifying suitable areas for ground water extraction in arsenic-free areas.
                  This is well-established geological and hydrogeological field and laboratory
                  work, and it can be done by the established and existing services - they would
                  just have to pick up the issue and start working on it.

                  Let's go ahead, not back into the dark
                  ages.

                  Regards,

                  Jürgen Tümmler

                  Jürgen
                  Tümmler
                  Regional
                  Water and Sanitation Sector Expert
                  Regional
                  Support Office South Asia
                  Directorate
                  General for Humanitarian Aid - ECHO
                  European
                  Commission
                  C-384
                  Defence Colony, New Delhi - 110024, India
                  phone:
                  +91 11 2433 6311 (extension 117)
                  fax:
                  +91 11 4656 8241
                  mobile:
                  +91 9871 897 579
                  email: rwc@...
                  website: http://ec.europa.eu/echo
                  ECHO
                  WatSan Review:http://ec.europa.eu/comm/echo/evaluation/watsan2005.htm

                  "This e-mail message does not constitute a
                  formal communication and does not necessarily represent the official position of
                  the Commission"
                  "Ce message électronique n'est pas une
                  communication formelle et ne représente pas nécessairement la position
                  officielle de la Commission"



                  ________________________________
                  From: arsenic-crisis@yahoogroups.com
                  [mailto:arsenic-crisis@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richard
                  Wilson
                  Sent: Thursday, October 08, 2009 7:01 AM
                  To: BINOD
                  KHAITAN
                  Cc: Arsenic Group; Shakawat Arsenic 7230
                  USA
                  Subject: [arsenic-crisis] More in the thread: 'Am I the only
                  one...'


                  [Re: BINOD KHAITAN Reply to "am I the only one"m shown
                  beloo]

                  BUT

                  You MUST be very careful about proper
                  sanitation.

                  You must filter pond water properly.

                  Th reason for
                  going to tube wells in the first place was to avoid bateria.

                  DO NOT go
                  back to a bacteria loaded pond water.

                  Dick Wilson

                  BINOD KHAITAN
                  wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Dear Vinay
                  >
                  > I refer to your
                  desperation ..... The solution is to re-start using
                  > pond water as the
                  source of SAFE drinking water both in Bangladesh &
                  > West Bengal
                  India where arsenic is a great problem. PONDs are being
                  > mistreated and
                  forgotten. Ponds were at one time revered as the source
                  > of saving LIFE
                  and were treated with utmost care.
                  >
                  > Further, I feel soak pit
                  method to re-charge under ground water is a
                  > must and must be given top
                  priority.
                  > Warmest Rotary wishes
                  > Always
                  > Keep
                  >
                  Smiling!
                  >
                  > PP BINOD KHAITAN
                  > Rotary Club of Central
                  Calcutta Visit : <www.rccentralcal. org>
                  > RI District 3291
                  Visit : <www.rotary3291. org.in>
                  > Phone : (91-33) 2461 4474
                  Mobile : (91) 93310 11538
                  > * Regional Vice Chairman - RLI South Asia
                  (India Nepal & Sri Lanka)
                  > Visit :
                  <www.rotaryleadersh ipinstitute. org>
                  > * Trustee Secretary
                  - Eastern India Rotary Welfare Trust
                  > * HANDS across the Sea - Project
                  Specialist Community Development -
                  > Standard of Living
                  > * 2003/04
                  & 2005/06 DGSC - District TRF Grants Sub-committee Chair
                  > * 2006/07
                  Dist.Advisor - TRF Alumini Committee & RLI Committee
                  > * 2007/08 - AG
                  TRF Grants
                  > * 2008/09 - AG International Service II
                  > "Rotary is an
                  organization of business and professional persons united
                  > worldwide who
                  provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical
                  > standards in all
                  vocations and help build goodwill and peace in the
                  >
                  world."
                  >
                  >





                  Now, send attachments up to 25MB with Yahoo! India Mail. Learn how. http://in.overview.mail.yahoo.com/photos

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • rezaul chowdhury
                  Dear All, I agree with Jurgen that going back to pond water is not a sustainable solution for drinking water source, rather cluster/community scale surface
                  Message 8 of 16 , Oct 8, 2009
                    Dear All,

                    I agree with Jurgen that going back to pond water is not a sustainable solution for drinking water source, rather cluster/community scale surface water or stormwater harvesting and treatment would be an alternative. There are many factors involved in providing potable water in SE Asia - not only technological but also societal, financial and management issues. Some regional NGOs with support from donar agencies are implementing small scale surface water treatment plants. There is no question in regional Bangladesh/India that groundwater is the best option for potable water (because of sanitation issues, low cost and high aquifer recharge rate in these region).

                    Many thanks.

                    kind regards,      
                     
                    Rezaul Chowdhury
                    Research Projects Scientist
                    Integrated Water Systems Planning
                    Land and Water Division
                    Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
                    Indooroopilly, QLD 4068, Australia
                    Rezaul.Chowdhury@...



                    ________________________________
                    From: Jurgen Tummler <rwc@...>
                    To: Richard Wilson <wilson5@...>; BINOD KHAITAN <binodkay@...>
                    Cc: Arsenic Group <arsenic-crisis@yahoogroups.com>; Shakawat Arsenic 7230 USA <shaka66@...>
                    Sent: Thu, 8 October, 2009 1:33:15 PM
                    Subject: [arsenic-crisis] More in the thread: 'Am I the only one...'

                     
                    Dear All,

                    certainly arsenic contents in groundwater are a threat in South and South-East Asia; nevertheless, they occur bound to known geological structures / settings.

                    Instead falling back into schemes from the pre-colonial past, when the Indian / South Asian was a mere 4th to what it is today, I would suggest analyzing how the problem could be dealt with. Pond water is not the solution, not for today and even more so not for tomorrow. There are means of getting arsenic and iron out of drinking water using aeration, convenient models and types have been developed in the wake of the Tsunami in North Sumatra (Medan, i.e.) with the Indonesian water provider and the German Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR) - that's one side. the other is identifying suitable areas for ground water extraction in arsenic-free areas. This is well-established geological and hydrogeological field and laboratory work, and it can be done by the established and existing services - they would just have to pick up the issue and start working on it.

                    Let's go ahead, not back into the dark ages.

                    Regards,

                    Jürgen Tümmler

                    Jürgen Tümmler
                    Regional Water and Sanitation Sector Expert

                    Regional Support Office South Asia
                    Directorate General for Humanitarian Aid - ECHO
                    European Commission

                    C-384 Defence Colony, New Delhi - 110024, India
                    phone: +91 11 2433 6311 (extension 117)
                    fax: +91 11 4656 8241
                    mobile: +91 9871 897 579
                    email: rwc@echo-india. org <mailto:rwc@echo-india. org>
                    website: http://ec.europa eu/echo <http://ec.europa eu/echo>
                    ECHO WatSan Review: http://ec.europa eu/comm/echo/ evaluation/ watsan2005. htm

                    "This e-mail message does not constitute a formal communication and does not necessarily represent the official position of the Commission"
                    "Ce message électronique n'est pas une communication formelle et ne représente pas nécessairement la position officielle de la Commission"





                    __________________________________________________________________________________
                    Get more done like never before with Yahoo!7 Mail.
                    Learn more: http://au.overview.mail.yahoo.com/

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • tanmay_dhar
                    Dear All, I still think that pond water is a sustainable water supply for rural people of India & Bangladesh. It is true that some initiatives have been taken
                    Message 9 of 16 , Oct 8, 2009
                      Dear All,
                      I still think that pond water is a sustainable water supply for rural people of India & Bangladesh. It is true that some initiatives have been taken by NGOs to supply the safe water but it is not adequate. More over, due to irregular/limited rainfall the recharge of ground water is also very low. For this lack of ground water, the arsenic contamination is increasing day by day. In India, this year, 2009, is already announced as drought affected year. After 1972 drought, this year, we received 24% below of the normal rainfall. No doubt, this year the arsenic contamination will increase. On the other hand, maximum number of rural people lives under the poverty line. The economic condition of rural people is nearly same in both countries. So, it is very hard to afford the safe water by the rural people where the NGO initiatives have not been reached. For this reason, the pond water is the most affordable for the rural peoples.

                      With regards
                      Tanmay Dhar
                      Kolkata, India
                      E-mail aalokolkata at gmail.com
                    • Saqib Karori
                      I totally agree with Mr. Chowdhury, Mr. Jurgen and Mr. Wilson that going to surface water for small systems like being discussed is not going to be
                      Message 10 of 16 , Oct 12, 2009
                        I totally agree with Mr. Chowdhury, Mr. Jurgen and Mr. Wilson that going to
                        surface water for small systems like being discussed is not going to be
                        cost-effective - from both capital and operational/maintenance perspective.
                        Surface water treatment is very complicated for these unsophisticaed
                        regions, and would require extensively trained operational personnel and
                        oversight.

                        There are numerous cost models, which suggest that even filtration type
                        treatment system for groundwater arsenic treatment is more expensive than
                        other simpler approaches (adsorption, no chemical addition). Compare that
                        to treating surface water with mutiple barriers of
                        clarification/filtration/disinfection type approach. It will never beat a
                        simple and effective single-barrier arsenic treatment approach for
                        groundwater.

                        We, as a community, need to work on developing an economical/effective means
                        to arsenic remediation. It could be dug wells with chlorination, tapping
                        into deep aquifer for arsenic-free groundwater, or aeration where iron is
                        plentiful to remove arsenic after precipitation. All these means
                        (technologies) are going to be site specific, as there is no
                        one-solution-fits all type of approach to the entire region.

                        But why are we discussing these issues? Is someone actually exploring
                        surface water supply to small communities that are arsenic-impacted? I may
                        have missed a part of the discussion here I believe.

                        Thanks for your attention.

                        Saqib Karori
                        4 Peaks Engineering Services, Inc.
                        Tucson, AZ 85715

                        On Thu, Oct 8, 2009 at 3:13 AM, rezaul chowdhury <rkchy2002@...>wrote:

                        >
                        >
                        > Dear All,
                        >
                        > I agree with Jurgen that going back to pond water is not a sustainable
                        > solution for drinking water source, rather cluster/community scale surface
                        > water or stormwater harvesting and treatment would be an alternative. There
                        > are many factors involved in providing potable water in SE Asia - not only
                        > technological but also societal, financial and management issues. Some
                        > regional NGOs with support from donar agencies are implementing small scale
                        > surface water treatment plants. There is no question in regional
                        > Bangladesh/India that groundwater is the best option for potable water
                        > (because of sanitation issues, low cost and high aquifer recharge rate in
                        > these region).
                        >
                        > Many thanks.
                        >
                        > kind regards,
                        >
                        > Rezaul Chowdhury
                        > Research Projects Scientist
                        > Integrated Water Systems Planning
                        > Land and Water Division
                        > Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
                        > Indooroopilly, QLD 4068, Australia
                        > Rezaul.Chowdhury@... <Rezaul.Chowdhury%40csiro.au>
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: Jurgen Tummler <rwc@... <rwc%40echo-india.org>>
                        > To: Richard Wilson <wilson5@... <wilson5%40fas.harvard.edu>>;
                        > BINOD KHAITAN <binodkay@... <binodkay%40yahoo.com>>
                        > Cc: Arsenic Group <arsenic-crisis@yahoogroups.com<arsenic-crisis%40yahoogroups.com>>;
                        > Shakawat Arsenic 7230 USA <shaka66@... <shaka66%40yahoo.com>>
                        > Sent: Thu, 8 October, 2009 1:33:15 PM
                        > Subject: [arsenic-crisis] More in the thread: 'Am I the only one...'
                        >
                        >
                        > Dear All,
                        >
                        > certainly arsenic contents in groundwater are a threat in South and
                        > South-East Asia; nevertheless, they occur bound to known geological
                        > structures / settings.
                        >
                        > Instead falling back into schemes from the pre-colonial past, when the
                        > Indian / South Asian was a mere 4th to what it is today, I would suggest
                        > analyzing how the problem could be dealt with. Pond water is not the
                        > solution, not for today and even more so not for tomorrow. There are means
                        > of getting arsenic and iron out of drinking water using aeration, convenient
                        > models and types have been developed in the wake of the Tsunami in North
                        > Sumatra (Medan, i.e.) with the Indonesian water provider and the German
                        > Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR) - that's one side.
                        > the other is identifying suitable areas for ground water extraction in
                        > arsenic-free areas. This is well-established geological and hydrogeological
                        > field and laboratory work, and it can be done by the established and
                        > existing services - they would just have to pick up the issue and start
                        > working on it.
                        >
                        > Let's go ahead, not back into the dark ages.
                        >
                        > Regards,
                        >
                        > Jürgen Tümmler
                        >
                        > Jürgen Tümmler
                        > Regional Water and Sanitation Sector Expert
                        >
                        > Regional Support Office South Asia
                        > Directorate General for Humanitarian Aid - ECHO
                        > European Commission
                        >
                        > C-384 Defence Colony, New Delhi - 110024, India
                        > phone: +91 11 2433 6311 (extension 117)
                        > fax: +91 11 4656 8241
                        > mobile: +91 9871 897 579
                        > email: rwc@echo-india. org <mailto:rwc@echo-india. org>
                        > website: http://ec.europa eu/echo <http://ec.europa eu/echo>
                        > ECHO WatSan Review: http://ec.europa eu/comm/echo/ evaluation/
                        > watsan2005. htm
                        >
                        > "This e-mail message does not constitute a formal communication and does
                        > not necessarily represent the official position of the Commission"
                        > "Ce message électronique n'est pas une communication formelle et ne
                        > représente pas nécessairement la position officielle de la Commission"
                        >
                        > __________________________________________________________
                        > Get more done like never before with Yahoo!7 Mail.
                        > Learn more: http://au.overview.mail.yahoo.com/
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >



                        --
                        __________________________________
                        This is what I do for fun!
                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/saqibrailfan/
                        __________________________________
                        2484 N Shade Tree Lane
                        Tucson AZ 85715
                        480.282.3869


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Richard Wilson
                        YES In West Bengal, Meera Smith is arranging in surface dugwells which are arsenic free and they avoid bacteria by: (1) Careful construction (2) Regular
                        Message 11 of 16 , Oct 12, 2009
                          YES

                          In West Bengal, Meera Smith is arranging in surface dugwells which are arsenic free and they avoid bacteria by:

                          (1) Careful construction
                          (2) Regular Maintenance (among other things screen it off so that mosquitos do not go in. They carry bacteria)

                          (3) Regular Chlorination (ordinary bleach will do although us water districts use more expensive chlorine compounds)

                          In Bangladesh, Dhaka Community Hospital is doing the same
                          Tests by Mostofa, Yousuf and collaborators show that the chlorination at the maximum suggested by US EPA brings bacteria to zero or close to zero, but they can rise again within weeks particularly in the monsoon.

                          Dhaka Community Hospital also has River Sand Filters and Pond Sand
                          filters. The River sand filters work well and have little arsenic and if maintenance is done almost no bacteria. Ponds are harder.
                          Filtering is more crucial.

                          What we all want is a system where the user does not have to think about it. This I have in the USA. But I pay a lot for my water!
                          It is a more complex issue in villages in Bengal - and the choice will not only depend on cost but on the ability and willingness of the user to perform whatever maintenance his/her system needs.

                          But in choosing - ask the ladies. They are the traditional water carriers.

                          Richard Wilson
                          http://arsenic.ws
                        • Saqib Karori
                          Thanks for the information, Richard. Careful construction and including all necessary features such as screens etc. to avoid contamination is fine. But is this
                          Message 12 of 16 , Oct 12, 2009
                            Thanks for the information, Richard.

                            Careful construction and including all necessary features such as
                            screens etc. to avoid contamination is fine. But is this not primarily
                            ground water which is under the influence of surface water? If that is
                            the case, filtration is must to filter disease-causing organisms. And
                            this groundwater under the influence issue becomes more important
                            during wet seasons of the year.

                            Perhaps Meera Smith can share soem water quality data from these dug
                            wells as it pertains to its contamination from surface water. I will
                            be interested in looking at such information.

                            The success of this technology can only be weighed based on how well
                            the maintenance is conducted. A short lapse in maintenance and
                            imporper disinfection, can result in real bad water quality concerns.

                            Thanks,

                            Saqib
                          • M Jahangir
                            Congratulations and thanks for sharing this important information. Request all to kindly mention their address or at least their location when commenting. This
                            Message 13 of 16 , Oct 12, 2009
                              Congratulations and thanks for sharing this important information.
                              Request all to kindly mention their address or at least their location when commenting.

                              This gives a better understanding to the reader, of the background of
                              experience.

                              Thanks once again.

                              In Pakistan we have Arsenic in Lower Punjab province, some work on this problem was/ is done by UNICEF and Pakistan Council of Research in water resources, Islamabad.

                              Hope this discussion leads us to some viable solutions, though it will be asking for too much

                              Rgds
                              M Jahangir
                              Fresh Water Action Network-South Asia
                              Islamabad
                            • Dr. M. Atiq ur Rahman
                              Dear All, Arsenic Crises network is highly valuable for us to share information about arsenic situation and mitigation techniques in different countries.Please
                              Message 14 of 16 , Oct 12, 2009
                                Dear All,

                                Arsenic Crises network is highly valuable for us to share information about arsenic situation and mitigation techniques in different countries.Please keep continue this service with unmoderated circulation of useful information.

                                Our research center (www.udercjapan.com) is also working on the issues related with arsenic and fluorides  contamination in Pakistan in collaboration with Japanese researchers and scientists.
                                 
                                Best regards,
                                M. Atiq ur Rahman
                                Executive Director,
                                UDERC
                                www.udercjapan.com


                                --- On Tue, 10/13/09, M Jahangir <mjahangir298@...> wrote:


                                From: M Jahangir <mjahangir298@...>
                                Subject: [arsenic-crisis] More: Comments from Punjab
                                To: "Saqib Karori" <skarori@...>
                                Cc: "Richard Wilson" <wilson5@...>, "rezaul chowdhury" <rkchy2002@...>, "Arsenic Group" <arsenic-crisis@yahoogroups.com>, "Dr Murtaza Mallick" <mumalik@...>, "Aslam Tahir" <pcrwr@...>
                                Date: Tuesday, October 13, 2009, 9:33 AM


                                 



                                Congratulations and thanks for sharing this important information.
                                Request all to kindly mention their address or at least their location when commenting.

                                This gives a better understanding to the reader, of the background of
                                experience.

                                Thanks once again.

                                In Pakistan we have Arsenic in Lower Punjab province, some work on this problem was/ is done by UNICEF and Pakistan Council of Research in water resources, Islamabad.

                                Hope this discussion leads us to some viable solutions, though it will be asking for too much

                                Rgds
                                M Jahangir
                                Fresh Water Action Network-South Asia
                                Islamabad















                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Soma Bhowmick
                                Dear Mr. Vinay Chand, I live in the North East of India and all my life I have lived in Guwahati, Assam, however I live in Shillong now after my marriage. The
                                Message 15 of 16 , Dec 4, 2009
                                  Dear Mr. Vinay Chand,

                                  I live in the North East of India and all my life I have lived in
                                  Guwahati, Assam, however I live in Shillong now after my marriage.

                                  The situation in Assam too is extremely hazardous, the drinking water
                                  situation here is unsatisfactory and people here have been suffering
                                  from effects of high levels of arsenic in the water being supplied.
                                  There are plants to treat water however the sewage system is
                                  deplorable here and the level of water contamination too is rising.
                                  The water supply system needs an overhauling here the State probably
                                  is doing it because national and international donors have stepped in
                                  despite that it is frustrating to note that nothing seems to move
                                  ahead Guwahati is becoming larger and more densely populated by the
                                  day without any proper/ adequate means to support this increasing
                                  pressure.

                                  In the past the people of Guwahati used to dig wells at the backyard
                                  of their homestead but not any more because the water level has
                                  alarmingly gone down with the coming up dangerous skyscrapper type
                                  buidlings that house several hundreds of families, big and small. They
                                  have bore wells that are dug, I do not how much deep into the land.
                                  This is again affecting the water levels of the surrounding area...it
                                  is a mess....if not in the urban areas in the rural areas I shall not
                                  be surprised if there are water riots in Assam as well.

                                  In solidarity

                                  Soma Bhowmick

                                  --
                                  Dr. Soma Bhowmick, PhD
                                  Trainer & Social Development Specialist
                                  C/o Aggya Cottage, Temple Road, Lower Lachumiere, Shillong - 793001, Meghalaya.
                                  Ph: (0364)2500318, (0)9436702626, (0)9435406888
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.