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  • John McArthur
    The London Arsenic Group, in collaboration with the University of Delhi and IIT Kharagpur, makes available its latest research in the journal Water Resources
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 11, 2008
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      The London Arsenic Group, in collaboration with the University of
      Delhi and IIT Kharagpur, makes available its latest research in the
      journal "Water Resources Research".

      How paleosols influence groundwater flow and arsenic pollution: a
      model from the Bengal Basin and its worldwide implication.
      J.M. McArthur, P. Ravenscroft, D.M. Banerjee, J. Milsom, K.A.
      Hudson-Edwards, S. Sengupta, C. Bristow, A. Sarkar, S. Tonkin, R. Purohit.
      Water Resour. Res., 44, W11411, doi:10.1029/2007WR006552.

      Abstract. In the Bengal Basin, the land surface exposed during the
      last lowstand of sea-level around 20 ka, and now buried by Holocene
      sediment, is capped by an impermeable clay palaeosol that we term the
      Last Glacial Maximum Palaeosol (LGMP). The palaeosol strongly affects
      groundwater flow and controls the location of arsenic pollution in
      the shallow aquifers of our study site in southern West Bengal and,
      by implication, in shallow aquifers across the Bengal Basin and
      As-polluted deltaic aquifers worldwide. The presence of the LGMP
      defines palaeo-interfluvial areas; it is absent from palaeo-channel
      areas. A palaeosol model of pollution proposed here predicts that
      groundwater in palaeo-channels is polluted by arsenic, whilst that
      beneath palaeo-interfluvial areas is not: palaeo-interfluvial
      aquifers are unpolluted because they are protected by the LGMP from
      downward migration of arsenic, and from downward migration of organic
      matter that drives As-pollution via reductive-dissolution of
      As-bearing iron oxyhydroxides. Horizontal groundwater flow carries
      arsenic from palaeo-channels towards palaeo-interfluvial aquifers, in
      which sorption of arsenic minimizes the risk of pollution.

      Professor of Geochemistry
      Earth Sciences
      University College London
      Gower Street
      London WC1E 6BT

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      London Arsenic Group
      www.es.ucl.ac.uk/research/lag/as/
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