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Journal article: Tale of two oxidation states: bacterial colonization As-rich environments

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  • Steve Drury
    This is a link to what seems to be an important paper on bacterial colonization of arsenic-rich environments and a possible means of bio-remediation. Because
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 28, 2007
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      This is a link to what seems to be an important paper on bacterial
      colonization of arsenic-rich environments and a possible means of
      bio-remediation. Because it is in a Public Library of Science e-
      journal, it free to access and download

      http://genetics.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371%2Fjournal.pgen.0030053

      A Tale of Two Oxidation States: Bacterial Colonization of Arsenic-
      Rich Environments

      Microbial biotransformations have a major impact on contamination by toxic elements, which threatens public health in developing and industrial countries. Finding a means of preserving natural environments—including ground and surface waters—from arsenic constitutes a major challenge facing modern society. Although this metalloid is ubiquitous on Earth, thus far no bacterium thriving in arsenic-contaminated environments has been fully characterized. In-depth exploration of the genome of the â-proteobacterium Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans with regard to physiology, genetics, and proteomics, revealed that it possesses heretofore unsuspected mechanisms for coping with arsenic. Aside from multiple biochemical processes such as arsenic oxidation, reduction, and efflux, H. arsenicoxydans also exhibits positive chemotaxis and motility towards arsenic and metalloid scavenging by exopolysaccharides. These observations demonstrate the existence of a novel strategy to efficiently colonize arsenic-rich environments, which extends beyond oxidoreduction reactions. Such a microbial mechanism of detoxification, which is possibly exploitable for bioremediation applications of contaminated sites, may have played a crucial role in the occupation of ancient ecological niches on earth.

      Dr Steve Drury
      Dept of Earth Sciences
      Open University
      Milton Keynes MK7 6AA UK
      Ph: #44-(0)17683-41173
      Fax: #44-(0)870-913-9175
      Web: http://www.open.ac.uk/earth-research/drury/index.html
      Earth Pages: http://www.earth-pages.com/news.asp
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