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Research article: Status of groundwater arsenic pollution in Holocene aquifers from parts of the Ghaghara Basin, India: Its relation to geomorphology and hydrogeological setting

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  • Babar shah
    Dear All: See the publication for your information   “Status of groundwater arsenic pollution in Holocene aquifers from parts of the Ghaghara Basin, India:
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 8, 2013
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      Dear All: See the publication for your information
       
      “Status of groundwater arsenic pollution in Holocene aquifers from parts of the Ghaghara Basin, India: Its relation to geomorphology and hydrogeological setting”
       
      Babar Ali Shah, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth (2013), v. 58–60, pp. 68–76. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pce.2013.04.015
       
       
      Abstract:
      A groundwater arsenic (As) survey was carried out for the first time in Faizabad, Gonda, and Basti districts of UP and 38%, 61%, and 42% of tubewells in these districts, respectively have As > 10 µg/l (WHO guideline). Moreover, 15%, 45%, and 26% of tubewells in Faizabad, Gonda, and Basti districts, respectively have As above 50 µg/l, the Indian standards for As in drinking water. About 86%, 69%, and 35% of tubewells in Faizabad, Gonda, and Basti districts, respectively are from shallow depth (21–45 m), and it is worth noticing that 47% As-contaminated (As > 10 µg/l) tubewells in these three districts are located within the depth of 10–35 m in the Holocene Newer Alluvium aquifers. The high content of As (7.11 mg/kg) is recorded in suspended river sediments of the Ghaghara River as well. Most of the As-contaminated tubewells in Faizabad, Gonda, and Basti districts are located close to abandoned or present meander channels and floodplains of the Ghaghara River. In contrast, tubewells in Faizabad, Ayodhya, and Nawabganj towns are As-safe because of their positions on the Pleistocene Older Alluvium upland surfaces. Deeper tubewells (>50 m) in the Pleistocene Older Alluvium aquifers are suggested as option for As-safe groundwater.
       
      With regards,
       
      Dr. Babar Ali Shah
      Department of Geological Sciences
      Jadavpur University
      Kolkata-700032, INDIA
    • Bibhash Nath
      Dear All, Please see a recent published article - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969713010140 Santanu Majumdera, Bibhash Nathc, Simita
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 24, 2013
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        Dear All,

        Please see a recent published article -


        Santanu Majumdera, Bibhash Nathc, Simita Sarkarb, Debashis Chatterjeeb, Gabriela Roman-Rossd, Manuela Hidalgoa.  Size-fractionation of groundwater arsenic in alluvial aquifers of West Bengal, India: The role of organic and inorganic colloids.

        Abstract

        Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and Fe mineral phases are known to influence the mobility of arsenic (As) in groundwater. Arsenic can be associated with colloidal particles containing organic matter and Fe. Currently, no data is available on the dissolved phase/colloidal association of As in groundwater of alluvial aquifers in West Bengal, India. This study investigated the fractional distribution of As (and other metals/metalloids) among the particulate, colloidal and dissolved phases in groundwater to decipher controlling behavior of organic and inorganic colloids on As mobility. The result shows that 83–94% of As remained in the ‘truly dissolved’ phases (i.e., < 0.05 μm size). Strong positive correlation between Fe and As (r2 between 0.65 and 0.94) is mainly observed in the larger (i.e., > 0.05 μm size) colloidal particles, which indicates the close association of As with larger Fe-rich inorganic colloids. In smaller (i.e., < 0.05 μm size) colloidal particles strong positive correlation is observed between As and DOC (r2 = 0.85), which highlights the close association of As with smaller organic colloids. As(III) is mainly associated with larger inorganic colloids, whereas, As(V) is associated with smaller organic/organometallic colloids. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirm the association of As with DOC and Fe mineral phases suggesting the formation of dissolved organo-Fe complexes and colloidal organo-Fe oxide phases. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy further confirms the formation of As–Fe–NOM organometallic colloids, however, a detailed study of these types of colloids in natural waters is necessary to underpin their controlling behavior.

        Regards,
        Bibhash Nath 

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