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Re: [arkitectindia] Say no to quota at AMU

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  • Syed Shahabuddin
    9 June, 2005 Asif Jalal from Syed Shahabuddin, Thank you for sending me your article against reservation for Muslims on AMU which I had already read. I would
    Message 1 of 18 , Jun 9, 2005
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      9 June, 2005

      Asif Jalal from Syed Shahabuddin,

      Thank you for sending me your article against reservation for Muslims on AMU which I had already read. I would like to know more about you, your profession and present occupation and your involvement in community affairs. Regards.

      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2005 6:51 PM
      Subject: [arkitectindia] Say no to quota at AMU

      Say no to quota at AMU
      by Asif Jalal 

      (Tribune 28.05.2005)

      THE demand by the fundamentalist fringe of the Muslim leadership for a quota for the Muslims at AMU, Aligarh, was long-standing. The government finally yielded to this demand when it approved the AMU Academic Council’s proposal to reserve 50 per cent of the seats for Muslims for admission in 36 postgraduate courses at AMU citing Section 2(1) of AMU (Amendment) Act, 1981, and Section 5(C) of the Act which empowers the university to formulate policies for promoting “the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India”. This approval, apart from being blatantly communal, is totally against the interest of the Indian Muslims. Though on the surface, it may appear contrary.

      It has to be understood that for the Muslim leadership in India, the institutions and issues like AMU, Jama Masjid, MPLB, Babri Masjid, Rushdie affair etc. are stepping stones of their political career through which they raise themselves to the corridors of power and manoeuvre the government of the day. The present move is a fine example of this fact.

      The previous government sought to bring AMU under the ambit of the Common Entrance Test (CET). This was interpreted as an attempt to “erode its minority character”. Now to draw political mileage from the whole affair, quota-based admission policy is being introduced as a sop to “rectify” the damage sought to be done by the previous government.

      The logic cited for this is “to promote the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India”. However, the argument that the study of the modern courses like MBBS, MCA, engineering, LLB, BEd etc by Muslims at AMU would promote their (Islamic) cultural advancement is absurd on all accounts.

      Today’s India is a land of opportunities. Thousands of educational institutions are providing courses in liberal arts, science, technology etc. like never before. We have low interest rate educational loans to facilitate the pursuit of the dream if we are poor. Thousands of fellowships are offered to the young and enterprising. It was never so easy to study and get empowered. There are countless men and women who, by hard work, acquired education and substantially improved their lot.

      However, among Muslims there exists really no earnest desire for education and material success through institutionalised mechanism. Muslim society is basically a lost world. It is a world of persistent delusion of persecution complex. It is a world of men sitting idly and waiting for the state to intervene and ameliorate their condition. Here children have no schools, no tradition of selfless intellectual pursuit, and no deep urge to awaken their self or to know the secret of life.

      In this world, the dominant belief is that Muslims are discriminated against in government jobs, therefore technical skill and educational qualifications are not worth pursuit. Education is seen more as an eligibility criterion for applying for government jobs than an instrument to choose one’s destiny.

      The advocates of educational uplift of the Muslim through reservations have no inkling to work at this level in Muslim society because it involves years of selfless, unnoticed, unrecognised blood and sweat in the hundreds of villages and towns of India. Such work will not win them a general election, or the favour of the ruling party.

      In fact, in the rear side of another institution of minority character, Jamia Millia, Delhi, you would get the largest mass of illiterate Muslims. The Muslim intellectuals of this institution are short of time and resources to educate and guide aimless young boys and girls, migrants and locals, unemployed and employed in the self-alienating and demeaning jobs.

      Again not very far from here is the locality of the Meo Muslims of Haryana, a community at the bottom of socio–economic indicators. In fact according to the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), female illiteracy among the Muslims on the all India level is 66 per cent and in Haryana it is universal (98 per cent).

      Ironically, an organisation run by people of another faith is working here, but not a single soul who is championing “to promote especially the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India” is to be found here.

      The prescription of reservation does not address this issue of mass illiteracy and a pathetic absence achievement motivation through approved means. And if there exists indifference and apathy towards education at the basic level, there will be no Muslim to go to study at AMU. The problem of the Muslim community is not the shortage of educational institutions to get enrolled, rather it is the shortage of men and women to get enrolled. The need of the moment is to unleash the reserve of talent, of infinite aspiration among the young Muslims and give it a constructive direction. 

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      Shimla, H P

      09418105353


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    • Athar haque
      I am with the thought of Mr. Asif Jalal. The problem of education among muslim wont solve just by giving the reservation at university level. First step should
      Message 2 of 18 , Jun 10, 2005
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        I am with the thought of Mr. Asif Jalal. The problem
        of education among muslim wont solve just by giving
        the reservation at university level. First step should
        be to streamline the madarsas with right and good
        educational practices. Apart from the Islamic
        studies... Both should go hand in hand.
        The problem lies in the thought of most of the Indian
        muslim. Nothing good will happen to them here in
        India. But if we see around us many muslims are at
        good position in India. They are in position to
        support other needy brothers. Just because they had a
        good education and a fraction of luck.
        Please comment...

        Athar Haque

        President: eHealth-Care Foundation
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        --- Syed Shahabuddin <muslim@...> wrote:

        > 9 June, 2005
        >
        > Asif Jalal from Syed Shahabuddin,
        >
        > Thank you for sending me your article against
        > reservation for Muslims on AMU which I had already
        > read. I would like to know more about you, your
        > profession and present occupation and your
        > involvement in community affairs. Regards.
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Asif Jalal
        > To: arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2005 6:51 PM
        > Subject: [arkitectindia] Say no to quota at AMU
        >
        >
        > Say no to quota at AMU
        > by Asif Jalal
        >
        > (Tribune 28.05.2005)
        >
        > THE demand by the fundamentalist fringe of the
        > Muslim leadership for a quota for the Muslims at
        > AMU, Aligarh, was long-standing. The government
        > finally yielded to this demand when it approved the
        > AMU Academic Council's proposal to reserve 50 per
        > cent of the seats for Muslims for admission in 36
        > postgraduate courses at AMU citing Section 2(1) of
        > AMU (Amendment) Act, 1981, and Section 5(C) of the
        > Act which empowers the university to formulate
        > policies for promoting "the educational and cultural
        > advancement of the Muslims of India". This approval,
        > apart from being blatantly communal, is totally
        > against the interest of the Indian Muslims. Though
        > on the surface, it may appear contrary.
        >
        > It has to be understood that for the Muslim
        > leadership in India, the institutions and issues
        > like AMU, Jama Masjid, MPLB, Babri Masjid, Rushdie
        > affair etc. are stepping stones of their political
        > career through which they raise themselves to the
        > corridors of power and manoeuvre the government of
        > the day. The present move is a fine example of this
        > fact.
        >
        > The previous government sought to bring AMU under
        > the ambit of the Common Entrance Test (CET). This
        > was interpreted as an attempt to "erode its minority
        > character". Now to draw political mileage from the
        > whole affair, quota-based admission policy is being
        > introduced as a sop to "rectify" the damage sought
        > to be done by the previous government.
        >
        > The logic cited for this is "to promote the
        > educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims
        > of India". However, the argument that the study of
        > the modern courses like MBBS, MCA, engineering, LLB,
        > BEd etc by Muslims at AMU would promote their
        > (Islamic) cultural advancement is absurd on all
        > accounts.
        >
        > Today's India is a land of opportunities.
        > Thousands of educational institutions are providing
        > courses in liberal arts, science, technology etc.
        > like never before. We have low interest rate
        > educational loans to facilitate the pursuit of the
        > dream if we are poor. Thousands of fellowships are
        > offered to the young and enterprising. It was never
        > so easy to study and get empowered. There are
        > countless men and women who, by hard work, acquired
        > education and substantially improved their lot.
        >
        > However, among Muslims there exists really no
        > earnest desire for education and material success
        > through institutionalised mechanism. Muslim society
        > is basically a lost world. It is a world of
        > persistent delusion of persecution complex. It is a
        > world of men sitting idly and waiting for the state
        > to intervene and ameliorate their condition. Here
        > children have no schools, no tradition of selfless
        > intellectual pursuit, and no deep urge to awaken
        > their self or to know the secret of life.
        >
        > In this world, the dominant belief is that Muslims
        > are discriminated against in government jobs,
        > therefore technical skill and educational
        > qualifications are not worth pursuit. Education is
        > seen more as an eligibility criterion for applying
        > for government jobs than an instrument to choose
        > one's destiny.
        >
        > The advocates of educational uplift of the Muslim
        > through reservations have no inkling to work at this
        > level in Muslim society because it involves years of
        > selfless, unnoticed, unrecognised blood and sweat in
        > the hundreds of villages and towns of India. Such
        > work will not win them a general election, or the
        > favour of the ruling party.
        >
        > In fact, in the rear side of another institution
        > of minority character, Jamia Millia, Delhi, you
        > would get the largest mass of illiterate Muslims.
        > The Muslim intellectuals of this institution are
        > short of time and resources to educate and guide
        > aimless young boys and girls, migrants and locals,
        > unemployed and employed in the self-alienating and
        > demeaning jobs.
        >
        > Again not very far from here is the locality of
        > the Meo Muslims of Haryana, a community at the
        > bottom of socio-economic indicators. In fact
        > according to the National Family Health Survey
        > (NFHS), female illiteracy among the Muslims on the
        > all India level is 66 per cent and in Haryana it is
        > universal (98 per cent).
        >
        > Ironically, an organisation run by people of
        > another faith is working here, but not a single soul
        > who is championing "to promote especially the
        > educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims
        > of India" is to be found here.
        >
        > The prescription of reservation does not address
        > this issue of mass illiteracy and a pathetic absence
        > achievement motivation through approved means. And
        > if there exists indifference and apathy towards
        > education at the basic level, there will be no
        > Muslim to go to study at AMU. The problem of the
        > Muslim community is not the shortage of educational
        > institutions to get enrolled, rather it is the
        > shortage of men and women to get enrolled. The need
        > of the moment is to unleash the reserve of talent,
        > of infinite aspiration among the young Muslims and
        > give it a constructive direction.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ASIF JALAL
        >
        > Asstt Supdt of Police
        >
        > Shimla, H P
        >
        > 09418105353
        >
        >
        >
        >
        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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      • Komal Das
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        Message 3 of 18 , Jul 29, 2005
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        • tanweer hasan
           quota for muslims in any form and anywhere is dangerous to say the least.it has to be understood very clearly that in the indian socio economic cultral and
          Message 4 of 18 , Aug 18, 2005
          • 0 Attachment

              quota for muslims in any form and anywhere is dangerous to say the least.it has to be understood very clearly that in the indian socio economic cultral and structural milieu muslim identity is not a homogenous identity.when you talk of quota for for muslim , the natural next question should be quota for which group of muslims?such quotas invariably go to the already empowered lots, the sections which have ruled this country over the centuries whose feudal vestiges continue tothis day , who dominate the muslim political space to this day and who serves their own interests by keeping non issues like babri masjid ,shah bano ,amu at the focus of all discussions on muslim subjects.throgh this they mislead muslim community and divert attention from issues like primary education,poverty alleviation and employment generation. it is time that their bluff is called.


            On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 Asif Jalal wrote :

            >
            >Say no to quota at AMU
            >by Asif Jalal
            >
            >(Tribune 28.05.2005)
            >
            >THE demand by the fundamentalist fringe of the Muslim leadership for a quota for the Muslims at AMU, Aligarh, was long-standing. The government finally yielded to this demand when it approved the AMU Academic Council’s proposal to reserve 50 per cent of the seats for Muslims for admission in 36 postgraduate courses at AMU citing Section 2(1) of AMU (Amendment) Act, 1981, and Section 5(C) of the Act which empowers the university to formulate policies for promoting “the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India”. This approval, apart from being blatantly communal, is totally against the interest of the Indian Muslims. Though on the surface, it may appear contrary.
            >It has to be understood that for the Muslim leadership in India, the institutions and issues like AMU, Jama Masjid, MPLB, Babri Masjid, Rushdie affair etc. are stepping stones of their political career through which they raise themselves to the corridors of power and manoeuvre the government of the day. The present move is a fine example of this fact.
            >The previous government sought to bring AMU under the ambit of the Common Entrance Test (CET). This was interpreted as an attempt to “erode its minority character”. Now to draw political mileage from the whole affair, quota-based admission policy is being introduced as a sop to “rectify” the damage sought to be done by the previous government.
            >The logic cited for this is “to promote the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India”. However, the argument that the study of the modern courses like MBBS, MCA, engineering, LLB, BEd etc by Muslims at AMU would promote their (Islamic) cultural advancement is absurd on all accounts.
            >Today’s India is a land of opportunities. Thousands of educational institutions are providing courses in liberal arts, science, technology etc. like never before. We have low interest rate educational loans to facilitate the pursuit of the dream if we are poor. Thousands of fellowships are offered to the young and enterprising. It was never so easy to study and get empowered. There are countless men and women who, by hard work, acquired education and substantially improved their lot.
            >However, among Muslims there exists really no earnest desire for education and material success through institutionalised mechanism. Muslim society is basically a lost world. It is a world of persistent delusion of persecution complex. It is a world of men sitting idly and waiting for the state to intervene and ameliorate their condition. Here children have no schools, no tradition of selfless intellectual pursuit, and no deep urge to awaken their self or to know the secret of life.
            >In this world, the dominant belief is that Muslims are discriminated against in government jobs, therefore technical skill and educational qualifications are not worth pursuit. Education is seen more as an eligibility criterion for applying for government jobs than an instrument to choose one’s destiny.
            >The advocates of educational uplift of the Muslim through reservations have no inkling to work at this level in Muslim society because it involves years of selfless, unnoticed, unrecognised blood and sweat in the hundreds of villages and towns of India. Such work will not win them a general election, or the favour of the ruling party.
            >In fact, in the rear side of another institution of minority character, Jamia Millia, Delhi, you would get the largest mass of illiterate Muslims. The Muslim intellectuals of this institution are short of time and resources to educate and guide aimless young boys and girls, migrants and locals, unemployed and employed in the self-alienating and demeaning jobs.
            >Again not very far from here is the locality of the Meo Muslims of Haryana, a community at the bottom of socio–economic indicators. In fact according to the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), female illiteracy among the Muslims on the all India level is 66 per cent and in Haryana it is universal (98 per cent).
            >Ironically, an organisation run by people of another faith is working here, but not a single soul who is championing “to promote especially the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India” is to be found here.
            >The prescription of reservation does not address this issue of mass illiteracy and a pathetic absence achievement motivation through approved means. And if there exists indifference and apathy towards education at the basic level, there will be no Muslim to go to study at AMU. The problem of the Muslim community is not the shortage of educational institutions to get enrolled, rather it is the shortage of men and women to get enrolled. The need of the moment is to unleash the reserve of talent, of infinite aspiration among the young Muslims and give it a constructive direction.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >ASIF JALAL
            >
            >Asstt Supdt of Police
            >
            >Shimla, H P
            >
            >09418105353
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >---------------------------------
            >Yahoo! Messenger NEW - crystal clear PC to PCcalling worldwide with voicemail



          • indian institute of developmen
            Dear Sir Quota in any form or reservation or favouring local community in any form will dammage in a long way. Allhabad University famous for producing IAS has
            Message 5 of 18 , Aug 18, 2005
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              Dear Sir
               
              Quota in any form or reservation or favouring local community in any form will dammage in a long way. Allhabad University famous for producing IAS has now come to present status. Even though it is now central university but fighting hard to regain its old status. In sixties made Hindi as preferred language of instruction. It did favour the locals. But at what cost?
               
              So will be the status for AMU which is famous world over for its quality product. Instead of favouring muslims it should favour intellectuals to raise institutions standard. If these great people are so concerned for muslims let them open another institution for them rather than spoiling the great institution on religious line. None of these persons are as great as Sir Saiyed Ahmad Khan who did not propose reservation.
               
              This all is political dram to spoil the great institution.
               
              Dr S K Trivedi

              tanweer hasan <tanweerhasan@...> wrote:

                quota for muslims in any form and anywhere is dangerous to say the least.it has to be understood very clearly that in the indian socio economic cultral and structural milieu muslim identity is not a homogenous identity.when you talk of quota for for muslim , the natural next question should be quota for which group of muslims?such quotas invariably go to the already empowered lots, the sections which have ruled this country over the centuries whose feudal vestiges continue tothis day , who dominate the muslim political space to this day and who serves their own interests by keeping non issues like babri masjid ,shah bano ,amu at the focus of all discussions on muslim subjects.throgh this they mislead muslim community and divert attention from issues like primary education,poverty alleviation and employment generation. it is time that their bluff is called.


              On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 Asif Jalal wrote :
              >
              >Say no to quota at AMU
              >by Asif Jalal
              >
              >(Tribune 28.05.2005)
              >
              >THE demand by the fundamentalist fringe of the Muslim leadership for a quota for the Muslims at AMU, Aligarh, was long-standing. The government finally yielded to this demand when it approved the AMU Academic Council’s proposal to reserve 50 per cent of the seats for Muslims for admission in 36 postgraduate courses at AMU citing Section 2(1) of AMU (Amendment) Act, 1981, and Section 5(C) of the Act which empowers the university to formulate policies for promoting “the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India”. This approval, apart from being blatantly communal, is totally against the interest of the Indian Muslims. Though on the surface, it may appear contrary.
              >It has to be understood that for the Muslim leadership in India, the institutions and issues like AMU, Jama Masjid, MPLB, Babri Masjid, Rushdie affair etc. are stepping stones of their political career through which they raise themselves to the corridors of power and manoeuvre the government of the day. The present move is a fine example of this fact.
              >The previous government sought to bring AMU under the ambit of the Common Entrance Test (CET). This was interpreted as an attempt to “erode its minority character”. Now to draw political mileage from the whole affair, quota-based admission policy is being introduced as a sop to “rectify” the damage sought to be done by the previous government.
              >The logic cited for this is “to promote the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India”. However, the argument that the study of the modern courses like MBBS, MCA, engineering, LLB, BEd etc by Muslims at AMU would promote their (Islamic) cultural advancement is absurd on all accounts.
              >Today’s India is a land of opportunities. Thousands of educational institutions are providing courses in liberal arts, science, technology etc. like never before. We have low interest rate educational loans to facilitate the pursuit of the dream if we are poor. Thousands of fellowships are offered to the young and enterprising. It was never so easy to study and get empowered. There are countless men and women who, by hard work, acquired education and substantially improved their lot.
              >However, among Muslims there exists really no earnest desire for education and material success through institutionalised mechanism. Muslim society is basically a lost world. It is a world of persistent delusion of persecution complex. It is a world of men sitting idly and waiting for the state to intervene and ameliorate their condition. Here children have no schools, no tradition of selfless intellectual pursuit, and no deep urge to awaken their self or to know the secret of life.
              >In this world, the dominant belief is that Muslims are discriminated against in government jobs, therefore technical skill and educational qualifications are not worth pursuit. Education is seen more as an eligibility criterion for applying for government jobs than an instrument to choose one’s destiny.
              >The advocates of educational uplift of the Muslim through reservations have no inkling to work at this level in Muslim society because it involves years of selfless, unnoticed, unrecognised blood and sweat in the hundreds of villages and towns of India. Such work will not win them a general election, or the favour of the ruling party.
              >In fact, in the rear side of another institution of minority character, Jamia Millia, Delhi, you would get the largest mass of illiterate Muslims. The Muslim intellectuals of this institution are short of time and resources to educate and guide aimless young boys and girls, migrants and locals, unemployed and employed in the self-alienating and demeaning jobs.
              >Again not very far from here is the locality of the Meo Muslims of Haryana, a community at the bottom of socio–economic indicators. In fact according to the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), female illiteracy among the Muslims on the all India level is 66 per cent and in Haryana it is universal (98 per cent).
              >Ironically, an organisation run by people of another faith is working here, but not a single soul who is championing “to promote especially the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India” is to be found here.
              >The prescription of reservation does not address this issue of mass illiteracy and a pathetic absence achievement motivation through approved means. And if there exists indifference and apathy towards education at the basic level, there will be no Muslim to go to study at AMU. The problem of the Muslim community is not the shortage of educational institutions to get enrolled, rather it is the shortage of men and women to get enrolled. The need of the moment is to unleash the reserve of talent, of infinite aspiration among the young Muslims and give it a constructive direction.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >ASIF JALAL
              >
              >Asstt Supdt of Police
              >
              >Shimla, H P
              >
              >09418105353
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >---------------------------------
              >Yahoo! Messenger NEW - crystal clear PC to PCcalling worldwide with voicemail



              __________________________________________________
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            • tanweer hasan
               amu is not a great institute ,it has a great history though.amu is a sad story of opportunities spilled away. from an institute of excellence it has been
              Message 6 of 18 , Aug 20, 2005
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                  amu is not a great institute ,it has a great history though.amu is a sad story of opportunities spilled away. from an institute of excellence it has been reduced to a govt. funded ngo ,keeping the feudal remnannts of the elite muslims in good humour by allowing them to run it as their family fiefdom.it is time to call the bluff.


                On Fri, 19 Aug 2005 indian institute of developmen wrote :

                >
                >Dear Sir
                >
                >Quota in any form or reservation or favouring local community in any form will dammage in a long way. Allhabad University famous for producing IAS has now come to present status. Even though it is now central university but fighting hard to regain its old status. In sixties made Hindi as preferred language of instruction. It did favour the locals. But at what cost?
                >
                >So will be the status for AMU which is famous world over for its quality product. Instead of favouring muslims it should favour intellectuals to raise institutions standard. If these great people are so concerned for muslims let them open another institution for them rather than spoiling the great institution on religious line. None of these persons are as great as Sir Saiyed Ahmad Khan who did not propose reservation.
                >
                >This all is political dram to spoil the great institution.
                >
                >Dr S K Trivedi
                >
                >tanweer hasan <tanweerhasan@...> wrote:
                >
                >  quota for muslims in any form and anywhere is dangerous to say the least.it has to be understood very clearly that in the indian socio economic cultral and structural milieu muslim identity is not a homogenous identity.when you talk of quota for for muslim , the natural next question should be quota for which group of muslims?such quotas invariably go to the already empowered lots, the sections which have ruled this country over the centuries whose feudal vestiges continue tothis day , who dominate the muslim political space to this day and who serves their own interests by keeping non issues like babri masjid ,shah bano ,amu at the focus of all discussions on muslim subjects.throgh this they mislead muslim community and divert attention from issues like primary education,poverty alleviation and employment generation. it is time that their bluff is called.
                >
                >
                >On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 Asif Jalal wrote :
                > >
                > >Say no to quota at AMU
                > >by Asif Jalal
                > >
                > >(Tribune 28.05.2005)
                > >
                > >THE demand by the fundamentalist fringe of the Muslim leadership for a quota for the Muslims at AMU, Aligarh, was long-standing. The government finally yielded to this demand when it approved the AMU Academic Council’s proposal to reserve 50 per cent of the seats for Muslims for admission in 36 postgraduate courses at AMU citing Section 2(1) of AMU (Amendment) Act, 1981, and Section 5(C) of the Act which empowers the university to formulate policies for promoting “the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India”. This approval, apart from being blatantly communal, is totally against the interest of the Indian Muslims. Though on the surface, it may appear contrary.
                > >It has to be understood that for the Muslim leadership in India, the institutions and issues like AMU, Jama Masjid, MPLB, Babri Masjid, Rushdie affair etc. are stepping stones of their political career through which they raise themselves to the corridors of power and manoeuvre the government of the day. The present move is a fine example of this fact.
                > >The previous government sought to bring AMU under the ambit of the Common Entrance Test (CET). This was interpreted as an attempt to “erode its minority character”. Now to draw political mileage from the whole affair, quota-based admission policy is being introduced as a sop to “rectify” the damage sought to be done by the previous government.
                > >The logic cited for this is “to promote the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India”. However, the argument that the study of the modern courses like MBBS, MCA, engineering, LLB, BEd etc by Muslims at AMU would promote their (Islamic) cultural advancement is absurd on all accounts.
                > >Today’s India is a land of opportunities. Thousands of educational institutions are providing courses in liberal arts, science, technology etc. like never before. We have low interest rate educational loans to facilitate the pursuit of the dream if we are poor. Thousands of fellowships are offered to the young and enterprising. It was never so easy to study and get empowered. There are countless men and women who, by hard work, acquired education and substantially improved their lot.
                > >However, among Muslims there exists really no earnest desire for education and material success through institutionalised mechanism. Muslim society is basically a lost world. It is a world of persistent delusion of persecution complex. It is a world of men sitting idly and waiting for the state to intervene and ameliorate their condition. Here children have no schools, no tradition of selfless intellectual pursuit, and no deep urge to awaken their self or to know the secret of life.
                > >In this world, the dominant belief is that Muslims are discriminated against in government jobs, therefore technical skill and educational qualifications are not worth pursuit. Education is seen more as an eligibility criterion for applying for government jobs than an instrument to choose one’s destiny.
                > >The advocates of educational uplift of the Muslim through reservations have no inkling to work at this level in Muslim society because it involves years of selfless, unnoticed, unrecognised blood and sweat in the hundreds of villages and towns of India. Such work will not win them a general election, or the favour of the ruling party.
                > >In fact, in the rear side of another institution of minority character, Jamia Millia, Delhi, you would get the largest mass of illiterate Muslims. The Muslim intellectuals of this institution are short of time and resources to educate and guide aimless young boys and girls, migrants and locals, unemployed and employed in the self-alienating and demeaning jobs.
                > >Again not very far from here is the locality of the Meo Muslims of Haryana, a community at the bottom of socio–economic indicators. In fact according to the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), female illiteracy among the Muslims on the all India level is 66 per cent and in Haryana it is universal (98 per cent).
                > >Ironically, an organisation run by people of another faith is working here, but not a single soul who is championing “to promote especially the educational and cultural advancement of the Muslims of India” is to be found here.
                > >The prescription of reservation does not address this issue of mass illiteracy and a pathetic absence achievement motivation through approved means. And if there exists indifference and apathy towards education at the basic level, there will be no Muslim to go to study at AMU. The problem of the Muslim community is not the shortage of educational institutions to get enrolled, rather it is the shortage of men and women to get enrolled. The need of the moment is to unleash the reserve of talent, of infinite aspiration among the young Muslims and give it a constructive direction.
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