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Re: [arkitectindia] Madrasa Education System

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  • monam khan
    Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and Scope for Modernisation Friends This should be read in the continuation of Dr. Shaheen Ansari s mail dated February 1, 2005.
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
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            "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and
                     Scope for Modernisation"

       

      Friends

       

      This should be read in the continuation of Dr. Shaheen Ansari's mail dated February 1, 2005.  Some people may raise questions  about its importance in discussing here.  So, I think, it is important to state about the relevance of this discussion.

       

      Every Muslim locality has a mosque and majority of them have Madrasas.  We at Ark Foundation believe that instead of building new infrastructure we should work on  reconstructing the already existing Madrasas in the country. This is not only economical but practically viable also. We can get teachers and students easily. What we need is to reorient old teachers of the Madrasas and appoint a couple of new teachers with the background of modern education system.

       

      Relevance of the discussion also lies in analyzing importance of Madrasas in majority of the Muslim society. In view of the ongoing changes in the social, cultural, economic, and political environment drastic changes is required in Madrasa system of education so that Indian Muslims could come to terms with the changing needs of contemporary Indian society.

      It is true that the  Indian Madrasas  have produced a number of world famous Islamic scholars, but lakhs of Muslims educated from these Madrasas are deprived of the job opportunities because of their ignorance of modern knowledge.  This create a vicious circle as majority of the students going to Madrasas are from economically weaker section of the society. Those who can afford send their children to mainstream schools including public schools.

      The debate is justified in a sense that it will provide a balanced synthesis of the classical and the modern method of teaching. The concern will be to seek ways in which Muslims can learn to integrate the revealed fundamentals and the ever transforming world of modern knowledge. It will show how the changes do not involve the dilution of the traditional thought, but the affirmation of the dynamic nature of the faith.

      Modernisation is understood primarily in relation to the need for modern subjects in Madrasa- not just for their own sake, but also in order to further understand the deeper implications of the Quran. A deeper study of history of the wider world for instance, is one such areas of improvement. Likewise, the study of social sciences, Hindi (national language of India), English (the language of the world) is necessary in order that the graduates feel at home in the world they live in and interact with. At the primary and intermediate levels, the pupils need to be exposed to key subjects taught in the alternative system of education.

      Modernisation is also important in terms of promoting employment oriented programmes. These are programmes through which the pupils will be given technical and professional training as well as religious, in order to be able to maintain themselves and their families. It is also making of Madrasa system of education relevant to modern times. 

       

      So on behalf of Ark Foundation I would like to request you to kindly throw some light on it.

       

      Thanks

      Monam Khan

      Coordinator

      Research Team

      Modernisation of Madrasa Education

      Ark Foundation

       

      PS: Friends we are looking for innovative ideas but we will also welcome ideas which you may have come across in books, journals/magazines and newspapers. You can also help us by sending names of references or web links on the above topic.  The purpose is to learn and develop a model for the modernisation of Madrasa education system. So the ideas should not be necessarily  your own creation but relevant to cause or the topic under discussion.



      shaheen ansari <shaheen@...> wrote:

              Madrasa Education System: A debate

      Friends

      In recent years Madrasas have attracted immense attention in India, more so than mosques and other endowed institutions of India. This has partially been on account of the general perception that fundamentalism, Islamization and extremist violence stem from the Madrasa. Orthodoxy, religious conservatism and obsession to medieval identity remained the main focus of Madrasa education in India. And this is the point from where the demand for debate on modernization of Madrasa on Indian soil gets strengthen.

      Before reaching at any conclusion we should ask ourselves:

        1. Is the perception per se is correct? or
        2. Is it a creation of media? or
        3. Is it propagated by people with vested interest?

      Well, in JNU people have different opinion. To understand this a group of students, coordinated by Monam Khan (monamkhan2002@...), has identified six Madrasa in South Delhi. They have selected South Delhi because it is close to both JNU and IIT, from where we draw most of our volunteers for the programme called "Two Hours A Week". I should tell here that in this programme every volunteer gives at least two hours a week for the development of our underprivileged brethren. Monam is taking this initiative not only to understand the above mentioned perception but also to initiate the experiment of Modernisation of Madrasa Education in India.

      We know that every individual carries his/her own socioeconomic, religious and educational background for his/her understanding on various issues. Several volunteers have come out with different argument to introduce different kind of courses/subjects in order to modernise Madrasas. There was a long debate on the issue and before reaching at any conclusion we decided to share it with the esteemed members of arkitectindia, an online group discussion forum and seek their opinion.

      Some of us believe that the Madrasas are playing a vital role in literacy movement. It is the real foundation of Muslim education in India. Now the questions to ponder are:

        1. Do the people who run these institutions lack clarity of vision about the present day economic and social needs of Indian Muslims?
        2. Are they playing a positive role in the scheme of their education?.
        3. Can Madrasas be converted into vehicles for communication of secular and modern knowledge so that Muslim participation in civil society increases?
        4. Is it possible to empower the entire community through the modernisation of Madrasas?

      Though we will welcome discussion on concept and relevance of Madrasa but we would like to focus on the scope for modernization of Madrasa. We invite suggestion and views for:

        1. Understanding Madrasa Education System
        2. Process or method for its modernization
        3. New syllabus taking into account the changed conditions of modern life and
        4. Steps to improve economic conditions of Madrasa students through vocational training.

      Now the forum is open for debate and discussion on "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and Scope for Modernisation". Can you spare a few minutes for this cause? Then kindly educate us on the above issue.

      Thanking you
      Yours sincerely
      Shaheen Ansari


       

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    • Sadbhav Mission
      Dear Shaheen, Your have raised an important issue. Three realities must be kept in mind: 1) Madarsas are the only avenues of education for most vhildren who go
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Shaheen,
        Your have raised an important issue. Three realities must be kept
        in mind:
        1) Madarsas are the only avenues of education for most vhildren who go
        there. In Yamuna Pushta slums I had made efforts to get children
        enrolled in govt schools but there was no room for many of these children. Then Janam patri was a problem. Further, parents did not expect themselves to be able to educate their child to a level where he/ she could find a
        job. Hence motivation for formal schooling was dampened.

        2) Poor children educated in madarsas are never fundamentalists. Poverty
        as a class deters them from being fundamentalists. Fundamentalism is a
        middle class and elite class mentality and political doctrine.

        3) Madarsa education in most svhools, where poor children study, is too
        minimal to develop any substantial understanding of society, religion,
        science, maths, langyage or cultivating any technical skills. This must
        be upgraded and better organized. Institutions like Nadva and Darul Uloom
        excel in a few of these of these areas, specially religion, Arabic and
        Urdu. The education however should be more broad based.

        Best regards
        Vipin


        monam khan <monamkhan2002@...> wrote:

              "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and
                       Scope for Modernisation"

         

        Friends

         

        This should be read in the continuation of Dr. Shaheen Ansari's mail dated February 1, 2005.  Some people may raise questions  about its importance in discussing here.  So, I think, it is important to state about the relevance of this discussion.

         

        Every Muslim locality has a mosque and majority of them have Madrasas.  We at Ark Foundation believe that instead of building new infrastructure we should work on  reconstructing the already existing Madrasas in the country. This is not only economical but practically viable also. We can get teachers and students easily. What we need is to reorient old teachers of the Madrasas and appoint a couple of new teachers with the background of modern education system.

         

        Relevance of the discussion also lies in analyzing importance of Madrasas in majority of the Muslim society. In view of the ongoing changes in the social, cultural, economic, and political environment drastic changes is required in Madrasa system of education so that Indian Muslims could come to terms with the changing needs of contemporary Indian society.

        It is true that the  Indian Madrasas  have produced a number of world famous Islamic scholars, but lakhs of Muslims educated from these Madrasas are deprived of the job opportunities because of their ignorance of modern knowledge.  This create a vicious circle as majority of the students going to Madrasas are from economically weaker section of the society. Those who can afford send their children to mainstream schools including public schools.

        The debate is justified in a sense that it will provide a balanced synthesis of the classical and the modern method of teaching. The concern will be to seek ways in which Muslims can learn to integrate the revealed fundamentals and the ever transforming world of modern knowledge. It will show how the changes do not involve the dilution of the traditional thought, but the affirmation of the dynamic nature of the faith.

        Modernisation is understood primarily in relation to the need for modern subjects in Madrasa- not just for their own sake, but also in order to further understand the deeper implications of the Quran. A deeper study of history of the wider world for instance, is one such areas of improvement. Likewise, the study of social sciences, Hindi (national language of India), English (the language of the world) is necessary in order that the graduates feel at home in the world they live in and interact with. At the primary and intermediate levels, the pupils need to be exposed to key subjects taught in the alternative system of education.

        Modernisation is also important in terms of promoting employment oriented programmes. These are programmes through which the pupils will be given technical and professional training as well as religious, in order to be able to maintain themselves and their families. It is also making of Madrasa system of education relevant to modern times. 

         

        So on behalf of Ark Foundation I would like to request you to kindly throw some light on it.

         

        Thanks

        Monam Khan

        Coordinator

        Research Team

        Modernisation of Madrasa Education

        Ark Foundation

         

        PS: Friends we are looking for innovative ideas but we will also welcome ideas which you may have come across in books, journals/magazines and newspapers. You can also help us by sending names of references or web links on the above topic.  The purpose is to learn and develop a model for the modernisation of Madrasa education system. So the ideas should not be necessarily  your own creation but relevant to cause or the topic under discussion.



        shaheen ansari <shaheen@...> wrote:

                Madrasa Education System: A debate

        Friends

        In recent years Madrasas have attracted immense attention in India, more so than mosques and other endowed institutions of India. This has partially been on account of the general perception that fundamentalism, Islamization and extremist violence stem from the Madrasa. Orthodoxy, religious conservatism and obsession to medieval identity remained the main focus of Madrasa education in India. And this is the point from where the demand for debate on modernization of Madrasa on Indian soil gets strengthen.

        Before reaching at any conclusion we should ask ourselves:

          1. Is the perception per se is correct? or
          2. Is it a creation of media? or
          3. Is it propagated by people with vested interest?

        Well, in JNU people have different opinion. To understand this a group of students, coordinated by Monam Khan (monamkhan2002@...), has identified six Madrasa in South Delhi. They have selected South Delhi because it is close to both JNU and IIT, from where we draw most of our volunteers for the programme called "Two Hours A Week". I should tell here that in this programme every volunteer gives at least two hours a week for the development of our underprivileged brethren. Monam is taking this initiative not only to understand the above mentioned perception but also to initiate the experiment of Modernisation of Madrasa Education in India.

        We know that every individual carries his/her own socioeconomic, religious and educational background for his/her understanding on various issues. Several volunteers have come out with different argument to introduce different kind of courses/subjects in order to modernise Madrasas. There was a long debate on the issue and before reaching at any conclusion we decided to share it with the esteemed members of arkitectindia, an online group discussion forum and seek their opinion.

        Some of us believe that the Madrasas are playing a vital role in literacy movement. It is the real foundation of Muslim education in India. Now the questions to ponder are:

          1. Do the people who run these institutions lack clarity of vision about the present day economic and social needs of Indian Muslims?
          2. Are they playing a positive role in the scheme of their education?.
          3. Can Madrasas be converted into vehicles for communication of secular and modern knowledge so that Muslim participation in civil society increases?
          4. Is it possible to empower the entire community through the modernisation of Madrasas?

        Though we will welcome discussion on concept and relevance of Madrasa but we would like to focus on the scope for modernization of Madrasa. We invite suggestion and views for:

          1. Understanding Madrasa Education System
          2. Process or method for its modernization
          3. New syllabus taking into account the changed conditions of modern life and
          4. Steps to improve economic conditions of Madrasa students through vocational training.

        Now the forum is open for debate and discussion on "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and Scope for Modernisation". Can you spare a few minutes for this cause? Then kindly educate us on the above issue.

        Thanking you
        Yours sincerely
        Shaheen Ansari


         

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      • Choudhary S. A . Azad
          Dear It is not matter madrasa education and ather we the people want to orgnaz a dibade in our all education becouse temorow any people say to ather
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 2, 2005
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          Dear
                It is not matter madrasa education and ather we the people want to orgnaz a dibade in our all education becouse temorow any people
          say to ather education pattran it is a problam in this matter we want to discas in education in india .


                                              S A Azad
          On Wed, 02 Feb 2005 monam khan wrote :

          >
          >      "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and
          >                Scope for Modernisation"
          >
          >
          >
          >Friends
          >
          >
          >
          >This should be read in the continuation of Dr. Shaheen Ansari's mail dated February 1, 2005.  Some people may raise questions  about its importance in discussing here.  So, I think, it is important to state about the relevance of this discussion.
          >
          >
          >
          >Every Muslim locality has a mosque and majority of them have Madrasas.  We at Ark Foundation believe that instead of building new infrastructure we should work on  reconstructing the already existing Madrasas in the country. This is not only economical but practically viable also. We can get teachers and students easily. What we need is to reorient old teachers of the Madrasas and appoint a couple of new teachers with the background of modern education system.
          >
          >
          >
          >Relevance of the discussion also lies in analyzing importance of Madrasas in majority of the Muslim society. In view of the ongoing changes in the social, cultural, economic, and political environment drastic changes is required in Madrasa system of education so that Indian Muslims could come to terms with the changing needs of contemporary Indian society.
          >
          >It is true that the  Indian Madrasas  have produced a number of world famous Islamic scholars, but lakhs of Muslims educated from these Madrasas are deprived of the job opportunities because of their ignorance of modern knowledge.  This create a vicious circle as majority of the students going to Madrasas are from economically weaker section of the society. Those who can afford send their children to mainstream schools including public schools.
          >
          >The debate is justified in a sense that it will provide a balanced synthesis of the classical and the modern method of teaching. The concern will be to seek ways in which Muslims can learn to integrate the revealed fundamentals and the ever transforming world of modern knowledge. It will show how the changes do not involve the dilution of the traditional thought, but the affirmation of the dynamic nature of the faith.
          >
          >Modernisation is understood primarily in relation to the need for modern subjects in Madrasa- not just for their own sake, but also in order to further understand the deeper implications of the Quran. A deeper study of history of the wider world for instance, is one such areas of improvement. Likewise, the study of social sciences, Hindi (national language of India), English (the language of the world) is necessary in order that the graduates feel at home in the world they live in and interact with. At the primary and intermediate levels, the pupils need to be exposed to key subjects taught in the alternative system of education.
          >
          >Modernisation is also important in terms of promoting employment oriented programmes. These are programmes through which the pupils will be given technical and professional training as well as religious, in order to be able to maintain themselves and their families. It is also making of Madrasa system of education relevant to modern times.
          >
          >
          >
          >So on behalf of Ark Foundation I would like to request you to kindly throw some light on it.
          >
          >
          >
          >Thanks
          >
          >Monam Khan
          >
          >Coordinator
          >
          >Research Team
          >
          >Modernisation of Madrasa Education
          >
          >Ark Foundation
          >
          >
          >
          >PS: Friends we are looking for innovative ideas but we will also welcome ideas which you may have come across in books, journals/magazines and newspapers. You can also help us by sending names of references or web links on the above topic.  The purpose is to learn and develop a model for the modernisation of Madrasa education system. So the ideas should not be necessarily  your own creation but relevant to cause or the topic under discussion.
          >
          >
          >shaheen ansari <shaheen@...> wrote:
          >        Madrasa Education System: A debate
          >
          >
          >
          >Friends
          >
          >In recent years Madrasas have attracted immense attention in India, more so than mosques and other endowed institutions of India. This has partially been on account of the general perception that fundamentalism, Islamization and extremist violence stem from the Madrasa. Orthodoxy, religious conservatism and obsession to medieval identity remained the main focus of Madrasa education in India. And this is the point from where the demand for debate on modernization of Madrasa on Indian soil gets strengthen.
          >
          >Before reaching at any conclusion we should ask ourselves:
          >
          >
          >      Is the perception per se is correct? or
          >
          >
          >
          >      Is it a creation of media? or
          >
          >
          >
          >      Is it propagated by people with vested interest?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Well, in JNU people have different opinion. To understand this a group of students, coordinated by Monam Khan (monamkhan2002@...), has identified six Madrasa in South Delhi. They have selected South Delhi because it is close to both JNU and IIT, from where we draw most of our volunteers for the programme called "Two Hours A Week". I should tell here that in this programme every volunteer gives at least two hours a week for the development of our underprivileged brethren. Monam is taking this initiative not only to understand the above mentioned perception but also to initiate the experiment of Modernisation of Madrasa Education in India.
          >
          >We know that every individual carries his/her own socioeconomic, religious and educational background for his/her understanding on various issues. Several volunteers have come out with different argument to introduce different kind of courses/subjects in order to modernise Madrasas. There was a long debate on the issue and before reaching at any conclusion we decided to share it with the esteemed members of arkitectindia, an online group discussion forum and seek their opinion.
          >
          >Some of us believe that the Madrasas are playing a vital role in literacy movement. It is the real foundation of Muslim education in India. Now the questions to ponder are:
          >
          >
          >      Do the people who run these institutions lack clarity of vision about the present day economic and social needs of Indian Muslims?
          >
          >
          >
          >      Are they playing a positive role in the scheme of their education?.
          >
          >
          >
          >      Can Madrasas be converted into vehicles for communication of secular and modern knowledge so that Muslim participation in civil society increases?
          >
          >
          >
          >      Is it possible to empower the entire community through the modernisation of Madrasas?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Though we will welcome discussion on concept and relevance of Madrasa but we would like to focus on the scope for modernization of Madrasa. We invite suggestion and views for:
          >
          >
          >      Understanding Madrasa Education System
          >
          >
          >
          >      Process or method for its modernization
          >
          >
          >
          >      New syllabus taking into account the changed conditions of modern life and
          >
          >
          >
          >      Steps to improve economic conditions of Madrasa students through vocational training.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Now the forum is open for debate and discussion on "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and Scope for Modernisation". Can you spare a few minutes for this cause? Then kindly educate us on the above issue.
          >
          >Thanking you
          >Yours sincerely
          >Shaheen Ansari
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >---------------------------------
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          >
          >
          >---------------------------------
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          >
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          >
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          >
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        • zubair hudawi
          Dear Sir, I am a graduate from an Islamic institution in Kerala after studying there for 12 years. I have done my BA and MA in Sociology from Osmania and
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 2, 2005
          • 0 Attachment

            Dear Sir,

            I am a graduate from an Islamic institution in Kerala after studying there for 12 years. I have done my BA and MA in Sociology from Osmania and Madurai Kamaraj Universities respectively through correspondence while I was in the Islamic College. I have done my 2nd PG in Arabic language from JNU and now I am in my second semester of Mphill in JNU SLL& CS.

            I’ve been reading interestingly all mails and comments from the well doing Arkitectindia and now wants to add some experiences in to notice.

            I studied till the fifth grade in a regular school and then enrolled at
            the Dar ul-Huda Islamic Academy, in Chemmad, in the Mallapuram district of
            northern Kerala. The Dar ul-Huda Islamic Academy, where I studied, is a good example of how we can incorporate modern education in the madrasa system.
            At the Academy we studied the general Islamic subjects, along with subjects like English, Mathematics, Science and History till the twelfth grade level. This allowed us to appear
            as external candidates in the government secondary school examination. In
            addition, we also learnt Urdu, Malayalam and Comparative Religions. Besides,
            we had to learn computers and take part in a range of extra-curricular
            activities, such as games and literary and public discussion groups.
            By combining traditional Islamic and modern education in this way, the
            Academy trains 'ulama who choose from a range of careers, and thus need not
            only work as imams or preachers in mosques. Some of the Academy's graduates
            are abroad, working in the Gulf. Some have joined various Malayali
            newspapers. Several of them are now studying at regular universities, many
            of them in higher Arabic and Islamic studies, but a few in other fields
            which madrasa graduates earlier rarely entered. Thus, for instance, a
            graduate of the Academy is presently doing his M.Phil in Sociology at Jawaharlal
            Nehru University, where he is working on 'The Crisis of Tradition and
            Modernity Among Muslims' for his thesis.
            In much of the rest of India there is a sharp dualism between Islamic and
            modern education. As a result, students who study in madrasas have little or
            no knowledge of modern subjects. Likewise, those who study in regular school
            have little or no knowledge of Islam. This dualism is reinforced by the
            stance of some traditional 'ulama, who seem to regard the two forms of
            knowledge as distinct from, if not opposed to, each other, although, as I
            see it, any form of beneficial knowledge is legitimate in Islam.

            In Kerala, this dualism has, to a large extent, been overcome. We have a
            unique system of Islamic education in Kerala. Every local Muslim community has its own madrasa, which is affiliated to a state-level madrasa board run by one or the other Muslim
            organisation. The madrasa boards prepare the
            syllabus and textbooks that are used by all the madrasas affiliated to them.
            The boards also conduct the annual examinations and send out regular
            inspection teams.

            The timings of the madrasas are adjusted in such a way that allows the
            children to attend regular school as well. In this way, by the time they
            finish their school education most Muslim children in Kerala have a fairly
            good grounding in Islamic studies as well. I don't think there is any
            similar system in any other Indian state, where, generally, if you want to
            study Islam you have to go without modern education. In Kerala, fortunately,
            we do not have to make a choice between Islamic or modern education. Our
            children can study Islam while at the same time carrying on with their
            regular studies as well. After they graduate from regular school, if they
            want to specialise in Islamic studies they can join an Arabic College, and
            if they want to go in for modern education they can enrol in a university. Nowadays we can see a number institutions continuing the combined study up to degree or PG level facilitating the students to study both religious and modern education.

            What I want to mention here is that Muslims see the religious education most important and necessary to keep the religious practices in their life. Eventhough nowadays the study has become to produce a particular so-called clergy class and oriented to do jobs with religion, the islamic education is religiously compulsory to every one to regulate the life of a believer and to mould a good human being who is good to humanity. In the prevailing situation we can or have to preach the need and necessity of modern education in a cordial and convincing manner. Unfortunately many who ventured earlier failed due to an accusing and blaming attitude with out considering the social milieu they live in and the cultural past they came through.

            A model which allow the students go ahead to achieve best schooling and after with that of keeping religious study would be identical for the betterment of Madrasa education utilising madrasa graduates studying in our universities because they would be better to impart and make understand the necessity of modern education to the concerned authorities.

            One thing is more important, that Madreasa graduates are not the potential terrorists they mostly keep kind hearts and minds and they are understood so by others because most of them are unwilling to interact especially with non-muslims due to complexes or habituated solitude. The potential terrorists are the common men who are deprived of even religious education, keeping the emotional and inflammable belief and touch with religion. So We cannot deny religious education but we must strive for making their prospects better with imparting good and suitable modern education.

            Offering all the kind services which I can

            Your Friend

            Zubair Hudawi K

            104, Jhelum Hostel

            JNU

            9868304304



            Sadbhav Mission <sadbhavmission@...> wrote:
            Dear Shaheen,
            Your have raised an important issue. Three realities must be kept
            in mind:
            1) Madarsas are the only avenues of education for most vhildren who go
            there. In Yamuna Pushta slums I had made efforts to get children
            enrolled in govt schools but there was no room for many of these children. Then Janam patri was a problem. Further, parents did not expect themselves to be able to educate their child to a level where he/ she could find a
            job. Hence motivation for formal schooling was dampened.

            2) Poor children educated in madarsas are never fundamentalists. Poverty
            as a class deters them from being fundamentalists. Fundamentalism is a
            middle class and elite class mentality and political doctrine.

            3) Madarsa education in most svhools, where poor children study, is too
            minimal to develop any substantial understanding of society, religion,
            science, maths, langyage or cultivating any technical skills. This must
            be upgraded and better organized. Institutions like Nadva and Darul Uloom
            excel in a few of these of these areas, specially religion, Arabic and
            Urdu. The education however should be more broad based.

            Best regards
            Vipin


            monam khan <monamkhan2002@...> wrote:

                  "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and
                           Scope for Modernisation"

             

            Friends

             

            This should be read in the continuation of Dr. Shaheen Ansari's mail dated February 1, 2005.  Some people may raise questions  about its importance in discussing here.  So, I think, it is important to state about the relevance of this discussion.

             

            Every Muslim locality has a mosque and majority of them have Madrasas.  We at Ark Foundation believe that instead of building new infrastructure we should work on  reconstructing the already existing Madrasas in the country. This is not only economical but practically viable also. We can get teachers and students easily. What we need is to reorient old teachers of the Madrasas and appoint a couple of new teachers with the background of modern education system.

             

            Relevance of the discussion also lies in analyzing importance of Madrasas in majority of the Muslim society. In view of the ongoing changes in the social, cultural, economic, and political environment drastic changes is required in Madrasa system of education so that Indian Muslims could come to terms with the changing needs of contemporary Indian society.

            It is true that the  Indian Madrasas  have produced a number of world famous Islamic scholars, but lakhs of Muslims educated from these Madrasas are deprived of the job opportunities because of their ignorance of modern knowledge.  This create a vicious circle as majority of the students going to Madrasas are from economically weaker section of the society. Those who can afford send their children to mainstream schools including public schools.

            The debate is justified in a sense that it will provide a balanced synthesis of the classical and the modern method of teaching. The concern will be to seek ways in which Muslims can learn to integrate the revealed fundamentals and the ever transforming world of modern knowledge. It will show how the changes do not involve the dilution of the traditional thought, but the affirmation of the dynamic nature of the faith.

            Modernisation is understood primarily in relation to the need for modern subjects in Madrasa- not just for their own sake, but also in order to further understand the deeper implications of the Quran. A deeper study of history of the wider world for instance, is one such areas of improvement. Likewise, the study of social sciences, Hindi (national language of India), English (the language of the world) is necessary in order that the graduates feel at home in the world they live in and interact with. At the primary and intermediate levels, the pupils need to be exposed to key subjects taught in the alternative system of education.

            Modernisation is also important in terms of promoting employment oriented programmes. These are programmes through which the pupils will be given technical and professional training as well as religious, in order to be able to maintain themselves and their families. It is also making of Madrasa system of education relevant to modern times. 

             

            So on behalf of Ark Foundation I would like to request you to kindly throw some light on it.

             

            Thanks

            Monam Khan

            Coordinator

            Research Team

            Modernisation of Madrasa Education

            Ark Foundation

             

            PS: Friends we are looking for innovative ideas but we will also welcome ideas which you may have come across in books, journals/magazines and newspapers. You can also help us by sending names of references or web links on the above topic.  The purpose is to learn and develop a model for the modernisation of Madrasa education system. So the ideas should not be necessarily  your own creation but relevant to cause or the topic under discussion.



            shaheen ansari <shaheen@...> wrote:

                    Madrasa Education System: A debate

            Friends

            In recent years Madrasas have attracted immense attention in India, more so than mosques and other endowed institutions of India. This has partially been on account of the general perception that fundamentalism, Islamization and extremist violence stem from the Madrasa. Orthodoxy, religious conservatism and obsession to medieval identity remained the main focus of Madrasa education in India. And this is the point from where the demand for debate on modernization of Madrasa on Indian soil gets strengthen.

            Before reaching at any conclusion we should ask ourselves:

              1. Is the perception per se is correct? or
              2. Is it a creation of media? or
              3. Is it propagated by people with vested interest?

            Well, in JNU people have different opinion. To understand this a group of students, coordinated by Monam Khan (monamkhan2002@...), has identified six Madrasa in South Delhi. They have selected South Delhi because it is close to both JNU and IIT, from where we draw most of our volunteers for the programme called "Two Hours A Week". I should tell here that in this programme every volunteer gives at least two hours a week for the development of our underprivileged brethren. Monam is taking this initiative not only to understand the above mentioned perception but also to initiate the experiment of Modernisation of Madrasa Education in India.

            We know that every individual carries his/her own socioeconomic, religious and educational background for his/her understanding on various issues. Several volunteers have come out with different argument to introduce different kind of courses/subjects in order to modernise Madrasas. There was a long debate on the issue and before reaching at any conclusion we decided to share it with the esteemed members of arkitectindia, an online group discussion forum and seek their opinion.

            Some of us believe that the Madrasas are playing a vital role in literacy movement. It is the real foundation of Muslim education in India. Now the questions to ponder are:

              1. Do the people who run these institutions lack clarity of vision about the present day economic and social needs of Indian Muslims?
              2. Are they playing a positive role in the scheme of their education?.
              3. Can Madrasas be converted into vehicles for communication of secular and modern knowledge so that Muslim participation in civil society increases?
              4. Is it possible to empower the entire community through the modernisation of Madrasas?

            Though we will welcome discussion on concept and relevance of Madrasa but we would like to focus on the scope for modernization of Madrasa. We invite suggestion and views for:

              1. Understanding Madrasa Education System
              2. Process or method for its modernization
              3. New syllabus taking into account the changed conditions of modern life and
              4. Steps to improve economic conditions of Madrasa students through vocational training.

            Now the forum is open for debate and discussion on "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and Scope for Modernisation". Can you spare a few minutes for this cause? Then kindly educate us on the above issue.

            Thanking you
            Yours sincerely
            Shaheen Ansari


             

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          • Sneha Singh
            Dear Zubair Before replying to your mail I though it is better to discussion with the arkitects in JNU. Mails of Prof. Tripathi and your were the main subject
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 4, 2005
            • 0 Attachment

              Dear Zubair

              Before replying to your mail I though it is better to discussion with the arkitects in JNU.  Mails of Prof. Tripathi and your were the main subject of the discussion. We take all the mails very seriously. That is why I am late in replying to your mail.  We are very happy to read your feedback. There is no doubt about the concern raised in the second point of Prof. Tripathi and you that the fundamentalism is a middle class and elite class mentality  and a political doctrine.  Though I don’t have much interaction with students of Madrasa background but we know that if given a chance, they can be as competent students as students from any other background. You and your friend are the best example around us. That is why Dr. Ahmad Khan, Monam and his group is working in this direction.  We can learn a lot from you.  

                           During the discussion we decided to explain the objective of the online discussion in detail so that people may find easy to reflect themselves from various angles or perspectives. I think Monam will agree with the following points:

               

              Objective Of the debate and discussion:

               

              The main objectives of the debate and discussion are as follows:

                    

                     i.      To discuss the role of Madrasa education in the context of Muslim society;

              ii.             To examine factors that promote Muslim children to Madrasa education;

              iii.            To look at the merit of appeal to modernize Madrasa education.

              iv.           To examine the core of reforms by some sections in Muslim society who advocate that the core of reform should consist of modification in the syllabus and teaching methodology.

              v.             To discuss about new syllabus for Madrasas. It will suggest removal of subjects from medieval period whose relevance today is hard to establish.

              vi.           To examine the relevance and validity of the claim of some sections of Muslims  and Ulemas that Madrasa are specialized institutions for religious education and transmitting the Islamic scholarly tradition, and therefore, preserve as they are.

              vii.          To examine the overall strength and limitation of education system of Madrasa in context of the community and its role in nation building and suggest changes and options.

              viii.        To discuss about ways and means to equip preachers possessing a sound knowledge of the scriptures and the world

              ix.           To discuss about suitable vocational course for Madrasa students.

              You can also aid if I have missed any point.

               

              Regards,

              Sneha Singh

              Secretary

              Ark Foundation

              JNU, New Delhi

              Ph. 9312838170

               

              PS: Zubair Sb, I am also in JNU and  will contact you soon to get your feedback and have a proper discussion on this topic. We believe person with such a vide educational background like you will be very helpful in the development of a model for introduction of modern education in Madrasas. Thank you very much for offering your service. We are looking forward to work together.

               



              zubair hudawi <zubyhudawi@...> wrote:

              Dear Sir,

              I am a graduate from an Islamic institution in Kerala after studying there for 12 years. I have done my BA and MA in Sociology from Osmania and Madurai Kamaraj Universities respectively through correspondence while I was in the Islamic College. I have done my 2nd PG in Arabic language from JNU and now I am in my second semester of Mphill in JNU SLL& CS.

              I’ve been reading interestingly all mails and comments from the well doing Arkitectindia and now wants to add some experiences in to notice.

              I studied till the fifth grade in a regular school and then enrolled at
              the Dar ul-Huda Islamic Academy, in Chemmad, in the Mallapuram district of
              northern Kerala. The Dar ul-Huda Islamic Academy, where I studied, is a good example of how we can incorporate modern education in the madrasa system.
              At the Academy we studied the general Islamic subjects, along with subjects like English, Mathematics, Science and History till the twelfth grade level. This allowed us to appear
              as external candidates in the government secondary school examination. In
              addition, we also learnt Urdu, Malayalam and Comparative Religions. Besides,
              we had to learn computers and take part in a range of extra-curricular
              activities, such as games and literary and public discussion groups.
              By combining traditional Islamic and modern education in this way, the
              Academy trains 'ulama who choose from a range of careers, and thus need not
              only work as imams or preachers in mosques. Some of the Academy's graduates
              are abroad, working in the Gulf. Some have joined various Malayali
              newspapers. Several of them are now studying at regular universities, many
              of them in higher Arabic and Islamic studies, but a few in other fields
              which madrasa graduates earlier rarely entered. Thus, for instance, a
              graduate of the Academy is presently doing his M.Phil in Sociology at Jawaharlal
              Nehru University, where he is working on 'The Crisis of Tradition and
              Modernity Among Muslims' for his thesis.
              In much of the rest of India there is a sharp dualism between Islamic and
              modern education. As a result, students who study in madrasas have little or
              no knowledge of modern subjects. Likewise, those who study in regular school
              have little or no knowledge of Islam. This dualism is reinforced by the
              stance of some traditional 'ulama, who seem to regard the two forms of
              knowledge as distinct from, if not opposed to, each other, although, as I
              see it, any form of beneficial knowledge is legitimate in Islam.

              In Kerala, this dualism has, to a large extent, been overcome. We have a
              unique system of Islamic education in Kerala. Every local Muslim community has its own madrasa, which is affiliated to a state-level madrasa board run by one or the other Muslim
              organisation. The madrasa boards prepare the
              syllabus and textbooks that are used by all the madrasas affiliated to them.
              The boards also conduct the annual examinations and send out regular
              inspection teams.

              The timings of the madrasas are adjusted in such a way that allows the
              children to attend regular school as well. In this way, by the time they
              finish their school education most Muslim children in Kerala have a fairly
              good grounding in Islamic studies as well. I don't think there is any
              similar system in any other Indian state, where, generally, if you want to
              study Islam you have to go without modern education. In Kerala, fortunately,
              we do not have to make a choice between Islamic or modern education. Our
              children can study Islam while at the same time carrying on with their
              regular studies as well. After they graduate from regular school, if they
              want to specialise in Islamic studies they can join an Arabic College, and
              if they want to go in for modern education they can enrol in a university. Nowadays we can see a number institutions continuing the combined study up to degree or PG level facilitating the students to study both religious and modern education.

              What I want to mention here is that Muslims see the religious education most important and necessary to keep the religious practices in their life. Eventhough nowadays the study has become to produce a particular so-called clergy class and oriented to do jobs with religion, the islamic education is religiously compulsory to every one to regulate the life of a believer and to mould a good human being who is good to humanity. In the prevailing situation we can or have to preach the need and necessity of modern education in a cordial and convincing manner. Unfortunately many who ventured earlier failed due to an accusing and blaming attitude with out considering the social milieu they live in and the cultural past they came through.

              A model which allow the students go ahead to achieve best schooling and after with that of keeping religious study would be identical for the betterment of Madrasa education utilising madrasa graduates studying in our universities because they would be better to impart and make understand the necessity of modern education to the concerned authorities.

              One thing is more important, that Madreasa graduates are not the potential terrorists they mostly keep kind hearts and minds and they are understood so by others because most of them are unwilling to interact especially with non-muslims due to complexes or habituated solitude. The potential terrorists are the common men who are deprived of even religious education, keeping the emotional and inflammable belief and touch with religion. So We cannot deny religious education but we must strive for making their prospects better with imparting good and suitable modern education.

              Offering all the kind services which I can

              Your Friend

              Zubair Hudawi K

              104, Jhelum Hostel

              JNU

              9868304304



              Sadbhav Mission <sadbhavmission@...> wrote:
              Dear Shaheen,
              Your have raised an important issue. Three realities must be kept
              in mind:
              1) Madarsas are the only avenues of education for most vhildren who go
              there. In Yamuna Pushta slums I had made efforts to get children
              enrolled in govt schools but there was no room for many of these children. Then Janam patri was a problem. Further, parents did not expect themselves to be able to educate their child to a level where he/ she could find a
              job. Hence motivation for formal schooling was dampened.

              2) Poor children educated in madarsas are never fundamentalists. Poverty
              as a class deters them from being fundamentalists. Fundamentalism is a
              middle class and elite class mentality and political doctrine.

              3) Madarsa education in most svhools, where poor children study, is too
              minimal to develop any substantial understanding of society, religion,
              science, maths, langyage or cultivating any technical skills. This must
              be upgraded and better organized. Institutions like Nadva and Darul Uloom
              excel in a few of these of these areas, specially religion, Arabic and
              Urdu. The education however should be more broad based.

              Best regards
              Vipin


              monam khan <monamkhan2002@...> wrote:

                    "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and
                             Scope for Modernisation"

               

              Friends

               

              This should be read in the continuation of Dr. Shaheen Ansari's mail dated February 1, 2005.  Some people may raise questions  about its importance in discussing here.  So, I think, it is important to state about the relevance of this discussion.

               

              Every Muslim locality has a mosque and majority of them have Madrasas.  We at Ark Foundation believe that instead of building new infrastructure we should work on  reconstructing the already existing Madrasas in the country. This is not only economical but practically viable also. We can get teachers and students easily. What we need is to reorient old teachers of the Madrasas and appoint a couple of new teachers with the background of modern education system.

               

              Relevance of the discussion also lies in analyzing importance of Madrasas in majority of the Muslim society. In view of the ongoing changes in the social, cultural, economic, and political environment drastic changes is required in Madrasa system of education so that Indian Muslims could come to terms with the changing needs of contemporary Indian society.

              It is true that the  Indian Madrasas  have produced a number of world famous Islamic scholars, but lakhs of Muslims educated from these Madrasas are deprived of the job opportunities because of their ignorance of modern knowledge.  This create a vicious circle as majority of the students going to Madrasas are from economically weaker section of the society. Those who can afford send their children to mainstream schools including public schools.

              The debate is justified in a sense that it will provide a balanced synthesis of the classical and the modern method of teaching. The concern will be to seek ways in which Muslims can learn to integrate the revealed fundamentals and the ever transforming world of modern knowledge. It will show how the changes do not involve the dilution of the traditional thought, but the affirmation of the dynamic nature of the faith.

              Modernisation is understood primarily in relation to the need for modern subjects in Madrasa- not just for their own sake, but also in order to further understand the deeper implications of the Quran. A deeper study of history of the wider world for instance, is one such areas of improvement. Likewise, the study of social sciences, Hindi (national language of India), English (the language of the world) is necessary in order that the graduates feel at home in the world they live in and interact with. At the primary and intermediate levels, the pupils need to be exposed to key subjects taught in the alternative system of education.

              Modernisation is also important in terms of promoting employment oriented programmes. These are programmes through which the pupils will be given technical and professional training as well as religious, in order to be able to maintain themselves and their families. It is also making of Madrasa system of education relevant to modern times. 

               

              So on behalf of Ark Foundation I would like to request you to kindly throw some light on it.

               

              Thanks

              Monam Khan

              Coordinator

              Research Team

              Modernisation of Madrasa Education

              Ark Foundation

               

              PS: Friends we are looking for innovative ideas but we will also welcome ideas which you may have come across in books, journals/magazines and newspapers. You can also help us by sending names of references or web links on the above topic.  The purpose is to learn and develop a model for the modernisation of Madrasa education system. So the ideas should not be necessarily  your own creation but relevant to cause or the topic under discussion.



              shaheen ansari <shaheen@...> wrote:

                      Madrasa Education System: A debate

              Friends

              In recent years Madrasas have attracted immense attention in India, more so than mosques and other endowed institutions of India. This has partially been on account of the general perception that fundamentalism, Islamization and extremist violence stem from the Madrasa. Orthodoxy, religious conservatism and obsession to medieval identity remained the main focus of Madrasa education in India. And this is the point from where the demand for debate on modernization of Madrasa on Indian soil gets strengthen.

              Before reaching at any conclusion we should ask ourselves:

                1. Is the perception per se is correct? or
                2. Is it a creation of media? or
                3. Is it propagated by people with vested interest?

              Well, in JNU people have different opinion. To understand this a group of students, coordinated by Monam Khan (monamkhan2002@...), has identified six Madrasa in South Delhi. They have selected South Delhi because it is close to both JNU and IIT, from where we draw most of our volunteers for the programme called "Two Hours A Week". I should tell here that in this programme every volunteer gives at least two hours a week for the development of our underprivileged brethren. Monam is taking this initiative not only to understand the above mentioned perception but also to initiate the experiment of Modernisation of Madrasa Education in India.

              We know that every individual carries his/her own socioeconomic, religious and educational background for his/her understanding on various issues. Several volunteers have come out with different argument to introduce different kind of courses/subjects in order to modernise Madrasas. There was a long debate on the issue and before reaching at any conclusion we decided to share it with the esteemed members of arkitectindia, an online group discussion forum and seek their opinion.

              Some of us believe that the Madrasas are playing a vital role in literacy movement. It is the real foundation of Muslim education in India. Now the questions to ponder are:

                1. Do the people who run these institutions lack clarity of vision about the present day economic and social needs of Indian Muslims?
                2. Are they playing a positive role in the scheme of their education?.
                3. Can Madrasas be converted into vehicles for communication of secular and modern knowledge so that Muslim participation in civil society increases?
                4. Is it possible to empower the entire community through the modernisation of Madrasas?

              Though we will welcome discussion on concept and relevance of Madrasa but we would like to focus on the scope for modernization of Madrasa. We invite suggestion and views for:

                1. Understanding Madrasa Education System
                2. Process or method for its modernization
                3. New syllabus taking into account the changed conditions of modern life and
                4. Steps to improve economic conditions of Madrasa students through vocational training.

              Now the forum is open for debate and discussion on "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and Scope for Modernisation". Can you spare a few minutes for this cause? Then kindly educate us on the above issue.

              Thanking you
              Yours sincerely
              Shaheen Ansari


               

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            • sang gupta
              Some more about Madrasa education debate Madrasa is an institution of learning, where Islamic sciences including literary and philosophical ones are taught.
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 22, 2005
              • 0 Attachment

                Some more about Madrasa education debate

                Madrasa is an institution of learning, where Islamic sciences including literary and philosophical ones are taught. Today there are lakhs of Madrasas which have been playing a significant role in making millions of Indian citizen literate and that too without any burden on government’s exchequer.

                They have played a commendable role in the formation of young minds but it can be further  enhanced by equipping Madrasas with modern educational infrastructure. There is a need to combine the teaching of modern subjects like computer, science and mathematics with religious learning. One can debate that the Madrasa education has led to the decline of educational or economic position of Indian Muslims in present environment but it will be hard to deny the fact that  Islamic-centric teaching is not friendly to the market in the contemporary world. In the absence of modern  knowledge the graduates produced by Madrasas are neither able to improve their own material prosperity nor they provide leadership to the Muslim community to face the challenge of modern world. It is very sad to learn that the job opportunity for a major chunk of Indian population is restricted to mosques and Madrasas which is not going to help in either material or spiritual development of the community.

                Educational backwardness of Indian Muslims is a national problem and, I believe, modernization of Madrasas is the only solution for it. Well that is my personal opinion.

                 

                Sangeeta

                JNU

                New Delhi

                 



                Sneha Singh <sneharkitect@...> wrote:

                Dear Zubair

                Before replying to your mail I though it is better to discussion with the arkitects in JNU.  Mails of Prof. Tripathi and your were the main subject of the discussion. We take all the mails very seriously. That is why I am late in replying to your mail.  We are very happy to read your feedback. There is no doubt about the concern raised in the second point of Prof. Tripathi and you that the fundamentalism is a middle class and elite class mentality  and a political doctrine.  Though I don’t have much interaction with students of Madrasa background but we know that if given a chance, they can be as competent students as students from any other background. You and your friend are the best example around us. That is why Dr. Ahmad Khan, Monam and his group is working in this direction.  We can learn a lot from you.  

                             During the discussion we decided to explain the objective of the online discussion in detail so that people may find easy to reflect themselves from various angles or perspectives. I think Monam will agree with the following points:

                 

                Objective Of the debate and discussion:

                 

                The main objectives of the debate and discussion are as follows:

                      

                       i.      To discuss the role of Madrasa education in the context of Muslim society;

                ii.             To examine factors that promote Muslim children to Madrasa education;

                iii.            To look at the merit of appeal to modernize Madrasa education.

                iv.           To examine the core of reforms by some sections in Muslim society who advocate that the core of reform should consist of modification in the syllabus and teaching methodology.

                v.             To discuss about new syllabus for Madrasas. It will suggest removal of subjects from medieval period whose relevance today is hard to establish.

                vi.           To examine the relevance and validity of the claim of some sections of Muslims  and Ulemas that Madrasa are specialized institutions for religious education and transmitting the Islamic scholarly tradition, and therefore, preserve as they are.

                vii.          To examine the overall strength and limitation of education system of Madrasa in context of the community and its role in nation building and suggest changes and options.

                viii.        To discuss about ways and means to equip preachers possessing a sound knowledge of the scriptures and the world

                ix.           To discuss about suitable vocational course for Madrasa students.

                You can also aid if I have missed any point.

                 

                Regards,

                Sneha Singh

                Secretary

                Ark Foundation

                JNU, New Delhi

                Ph. 9312838170

                 

                PS: Zubair Sb, I am also in JNU and  will contact you soon to get your feedback and have a proper discussion on this topic. We believe person with such a vide educational background like you will be very helpful in the development of a model for introduction of modern education in Madrasas. Thank you very much for offering your service. We are looking forward to work together.

                 



                zubair hudawi <zubyhudawi@...> wrote:

                Dear Sir,

                I am a graduate from an Islamic institution in Kerala after studying there for 12 years. I have done my BA and MA in Sociology from Osmania and Madurai Kamaraj Universities respectively through correspondence while I was in the Islamic College. I have done my 2nd PG in Arabic language from JNU and now I am in my second semester of Mphill in JNU SLL& CS.

                I’ve been reading interestingly all mails and comments from the well doing Arkitectindia and now wants to add some experiences in to notice.

                I studied till the fifth grade in a regular school and then enrolled at
                the Dar ul-Huda Islamic Academy, in Chemmad, in the Mallapuram district of
                northern Kerala. The Dar ul-Huda Islamic Academy, where I studied, is a good example of how we can incorporate modern education in the madrasa system.
                At the Academy we studied the general Islamic subjects, along with subjects like English, Mathematics, Science and History till the twelfth grade level. This allowed us to appear
                as external candidates in the government secondary school examination. In
                addition, we also learnt Urdu, Malayalam and Comparative Religions. Besides,
                we had to learn computers and take part in a range of extra-curricular
                activities, such as games and literary and public discussion groups.
                By combining traditional Islamic and modern education in this way, the
                Academy trains 'ulama who choose from a range of careers, and thus need not
                only work as imams or preachers in mosques. Some of the Academy's graduates
                are abroad, working in the Gulf. Some have joined various Malayali
                newspapers. Several of them are now studying at regular universities, many
                of them in higher Arabic and Islamic studies, but a few in other fields
                which madrasa graduates earlier rarely entered. Thus, for instance, a
                graduate of the Academy is presently doing his M.Phil in Sociology at Jawaharlal
                Nehru University, where he is working on 'The Crisis of Tradition and
                Modernity Among Muslims' for his thesis.
                In much of the rest of India there is a sharp dualism between Islamic and
                modern education. As a result, students who study in madrasas have little or
                no knowledge of modern subjects. Likewise, those who study in regular school
                have little or no knowledge of Islam. This dualism is reinforced by the
                stance of some traditional 'ulama, who seem to regard the two forms of
                knowledge as distinct from, if not opposed to, each other, although, as I
                see it, any form of beneficial knowledge is legitimate in Islam.

                In Kerala, this dualism has, to a large extent, been overcome. We have a
                unique system of Islamic education in Kerala. Every local Muslim community has its own madrasa, which is affiliated to a state-level madrasa board run by one or the other Muslim
                organisation. The madrasa boards prepare the
                syllabus and textbooks that are used by all the madrasas affiliated to them.
                The boards also conduct the annual examinations and send out regular
                inspection teams.

                The timings of the madrasas are adjusted in such a way that allows the
                children to attend regular school as well. In this way, by the time they
                finish their school education most Muslim children in Kerala have a fairly
                good grounding in Islamic studies as well. I don't think there is any
                similar system in any other Indian state, where, generally, if you want to
                study Islam you have to go without modern education. In Kerala, fortunately,
                we do not have to make a choice between Islamic or modern education. Our
                children can study Islam while at the same time carrying on with their
                regular studies as well. After they graduate from regular school, if they
                want to specialise in Islamic studies they can join an Arabic College, and
                if they want to go in for modern education they can enrol in a university. Nowadays we can see a number institutions continuing the combined study up to degree or PG level facilitating the students to study both religious and modern education.

                What I want to mention here is that Muslims see the religious education most important and necessary to keep the religious practices in their life. Eventhough nowadays the study has become to produce a particular so-called clergy class and oriented to do jobs with religion, the islamic education is religiously compulsory to every one to regulate the life of a believer and to mould a good human being who is good to humanity. In the prevailing situation we can or have to preach the need and necessity of modern education in a cordial and convincing manner. Unfortunately many who ventured earlier failed due to an accusing and blaming attitude with out considering the social milieu they live in and the cultural past they came through.

                A model which allow the students go ahead to achieve best schooling and after with that of keeping religious study would be identical for the betterment of Madrasa education utilising madrasa graduates studying in our universities because they would be better to impart and make understand the necessity of modern education to the concerned authorities.

                One thing is more important, that Madreasa graduates are not the potential terrorists they mostly keep kind hearts and minds and they are understood so by others because most of them are unwilling to interact especially with non-muslims due to complexes or habituated solitude. The potential terrorists are the common men who are deprived of even religious education, keeping the emotional and inflammable belief and touch with religion. So We cannot deny religious education but we must strive for making their prospects better with imparting good and suitable modern education.

                Offering all the kind services which I can

                Your Friend

                Zubair Hudawi K

                104, Jhelum Hostel

                JNU

                9868304304



                Sadbhav Mission <sadbhavmission@...> wrote:
                Dear Shaheen,
                Your have raised an important issue. Three realities must be kept
                in mind:
                1) Madarsas are the only avenues of education for most vhildren who go
                there. In Yamuna Pushta slums I had made efforts to get children
                enrolled in govt schools but there was no room for many of these children. Then Janam patri was a problem. Further, parents did not expect themselves to be able to educate their child to a level where he/ she could find a
                job. Hence motivation for formal schooling was dampened.

                2) Poor children educated in madarsas are never fundamentalists. Poverty
                as a class deters them from being fundamentalists. Fundamentalism is a
                middle class and elite class mentality and political doctrine.

                3) Madarsa education in most svhools, where poor children study, is too
                minimal to develop any substantial understanding of society, religion,
                science, maths, langyage or cultivating any technical skills. This must
                be upgraded and better organized. Institutions like Nadva and Darul Uloom
                excel in a few of these of these areas, specially religion, Arabic and
                Urdu. The education however should be more broad based.

                Best regards
                Vipin


                monam khan <monamkhan2002@...> wrote:

                      "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and
                               Scope for Modernisation"

                 

                Friends

                 

                This should be read in the continuation of Dr. Shaheen Ansari's mail dated February 1, 2005.  Some people may raise questions  about its importance in discussing here.  So, I think, it is important to state about the relevance of this discussion.

                 

                Every Muslim locality has a mosque and majority of them have Madrasas.  We at Ark Foundation believe that instead of building new infrastructure we should work on  reconstructing the already existing Madrasas in the country. This is not only economical but practically viable also. We can get teachers and students easily. What we need is to reorient old teachers of the Madrasas and appoint a couple of new teachers with the background of modern education system.

                 

                Relevance of the discussion also lies in analyzing importance of Madrasas in majority of the Muslim society. In view of the ongoing changes in the social, cultural, economic, and political environment drastic changes is required in Madrasa system of education so that Indian Muslims could come to terms with the changing needs of contemporary Indian society.

                It is true that the  Indian Madrasas  have produced a number of world famous Islamic scholars, but lakhs of Muslims educated from these Madrasas are deprived of the job opportunities because of their ignorance of modern knowledge.  This create a vicious circle as majority of the students going to Madrasas are from economically weaker section of the society. Those who can afford send their children to mainstream schools including public schools.

                The debate is justified in a sense that it will provide a balanced synthesis of the classical and the modern method of teaching. The concern will be to seek ways in which Muslims can learn to integrate the revealed fundamentals and the ever transforming world of modern knowledge. It will show how the changes do not involve the dilution of the traditional thought, but the affirmation of the dynamic nature of the faith.

                Modernisation is understood primarily in relation to the need for modern subjects in Madrasa- not just for their own sake, but also in order to further understand the deeper implications of the Quran. A deeper study of history of the wider world for instance, is one such areas of improvement. Likewise, the study of social sciences, Hindi (national language of India), English (the language of the world) is necessary in order that the graduates feel at home in the world they live in and interact with. At the primary and intermediate levels, the pupils need to be exposed to key subjects taught in the alternative system of education.

                Modernisation is also important in terms of promoting employment oriented programmes. These are programmes through which the pupils will be given technical and professional training as well as religious, in order to be able to maintain themselves and their families. It is also making of Madrasa system of education relevant to modern times. 

                 

                So on behalf of Ark Foundation I would like to request you to kindly throw some light on it.

                 

                Thanks

                Monam Khan

                Coordinator

                Research Team

                Modernisation of Madrasa Education

                Ark Foundation

                 

                PS: Friends we are looking for innovative ideas but we will also welcome ideas which you may have come across in books, journals/magazines and newspapers. You can also help us by sending names of references or web links on the above topic.  The purpose is to learn and develop a model for the modernisation of Madrasa education system. So the ideas should not be necessarily  your own creation but relevant to cause or the topic under discussion.



                shaheen ansari <shaheen@...> wrote:

                        Madrasa Education System: A debate

                Friends

                In recent years Madrasas have attracted immense attention in India, more so than mosques and other endowed institutions of India. This has partially been on account of the general perception that fundamentalism, Islamization and extremist violence stem from the Madrasa. Orthodoxy, religious conservatism and obsession to medieval identity remained the main focus of Madrasa education in India. And this is the point from where the demand for debate on modernization of Madrasa on Indian soil gets strengthen.

                Before reaching at any conclusion we should ask ourselves:

                  1. Is the perception per se is correct? or
                  2. Is it a creation of media? or
                  3. Is it propagated by people with vested interest?

                Well, in JNU people have different opinion. To understand this a group of students, coordinated by Monam Khan (monamkhan2002@...), has identified six Madrasa in South Delhi. They have selected South Delhi because it is close to both JNU and IIT, from where we draw most of our volunteers for the programme called "Two Hours A Week". I should tell here that in this programme every volunteer gives at least two hours a week for the development of our underprivileged brethren. Monam is taking this initiative not only to understand the above mentioned perception but also to initiate the experiment of Modernisation of Madrasa Education in India.

                We know that every individual carries his/her own socioeconomic, religious and educational background for his/her understanding on various issues. Several volunteers have come out with different argument to introduce different kind of courses/subjects in order to modernise Madrasas. There was a long debate on the issue and before reaching at any conclusion we decided to share it with the esteemed members of arkitectindia, an online group discussion forum and seek their opinion.

                Some of us believe that the Madrasas are playing a vital role in literacy movement. It is the real foundation of Muslim education in India. Now the questions to ponder are:

                  1. Do the people who run these institutions lack clarity of vision about the present day economic and social needs of Indian Muslims?
                  2. Are they playing a positive role in the scheme of their education?.
                  3. Can Madrasas be converted into vehicles for communication of secular and modern knowledge so that Muslim participation in civil society increases?
                  4. Is it possible to empower the entire community through the modernisation of Madrasas?

                Though we will welcome discussion on concept and relevance of Madrasa but we would like to focus on the scope for modernization of Madrasa. We invite suggestion and views for:

                  1. Understanding Madrasa Education System
                  2. Process or method for its modernization
                  3. New syllabus taking into account the changed conditions of modern life and
                  4. Steps to improve economic conditions of Madrasa students through vocational training.

                Now the forum is open for debate and discussion on "Madrasa: Concept, Relevance and Scope for Modernisation". Can you spare a few minutes for this cause? Then kindly educate us on the above issue.

                Thanking you
                Yours sincerely
                Shaheen Ansari


                 

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