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An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal

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  • Ujjwal K Chowdhury
    An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal Dear Arvindji, Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests
    Message 1 of 15 , May 19, 2014
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      An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal


      Dear Arvindji,


      Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.


      First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.


      Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?


      Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.


      Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.


      Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.


      Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.


      Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.


      Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.


      Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.


      Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.


      Thanks and regards
      A self proclaimed AAP admirer

      --
      Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
      Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
      President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
      Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
      Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.
    • Daniel Mazgaonkar
      This is a very balanced and well written open letter to Arvind Kejriwalji. I fully support the points mentioned. Thank you Prof. Ujjwal ji. Daniel Mazgaonkar
      Message 2 of 15 , May 20, 2014
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        This is a very balanced and well written open letter to Arvind Kejriwalji. I fully support the points mentioned. Thank you Prof. Ujjwal ji.

        Daniel Mazgaonkar
        Sarvodaya activist


        On 20 May 2014 06:02, Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
         

        An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal


        Dear Arvindji,


        Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.


        First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.


        Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?


        Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.


        Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.


        Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.


        Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.


        Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.


        Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.


        Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.


        Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.


        Thanks and regards
        A self proclaimed AAP admirer

        --
        Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
        Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
        President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
        Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
        Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.




        --

        व्यक्तिगत मन की गति जहाँ कुंठित होती है वह वैकुंठ
        -----------------
        र्म - जाति - पंथ - भाषा - पक्ष - प्रांत
        विषमता का अंत याने सर्वोदय.



      • Kaleem Kawaja
        Excellent comments Sent from my iPhone ... Excellent comments Sent from my iPhone On May 20, 2014, at 10:28 PM, Daniel Mazgaonkar daniel.mazgaonkar@gmail.com
        Message 3 of 15 , May 21, 2014
        • 0 Attachment
          Excellent comments

          Sent from my iPhone

          On May 20, 2014, at 10:28 PM, "Daniel Mazgaonkar daniel.mazgaonkar@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

           

          This is a very balanced and well written open letter to Arvind Kejriwalji. I fully support the points mentioned. Thank you Prof. Ujjwal ji.

          Daniel Mazgaonkar
          Sarvodaya activist


          On 20 May 2014 06:02, Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
           

          An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal


          Dear Arvindji,


          Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.


          First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress andBJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.


          Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?


          Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.


          Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.


          Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.


          Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.


          Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.


          Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.


          Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.


          Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.


          Thanks and regards
          A self proclaimed AAP admirer

          --
          Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
          Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
          President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
          Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
          Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.




          --

          व्यक्तिगत मन की गति जहाँ कुंठित होती है वह वैकुंठ
          -----------------
          र्म - जाति - पंथ - भाषा - पक्ष - प्रांत
          विषमता का अंत याने सर्वोदय.



        • Abu Shariq
          Dear Prof Ujjwal I congratulate you for your balanced, positive and comprehensive critique of AAP. I would like to add one more point. AAP should give equal
          Message 4 of 15 , May 21, 2014
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Prof Ujjwal
            I congratulate you for your balanced, positive and comprehensive critique of AAP. I would like to add one more point. AAP should give equal emphasis to the politics of social justice as it gives to corruption. AAP should also focus on developing leaders from the marginalised castes and communities. In this way AAP will be able increase its depth in the Indian polity.


            On Tue, May 20, 2014 at 3:32 AM, Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
             

            An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal


            Dear Arvindji,


            Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.


            First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.


            Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?


            Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.


            Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.


            Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.


            Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.


            Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.


            Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.


            Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.


            Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.


            Thanks and regards
            A self proclaimed AAP admirer

            --
            Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
            Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
            President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
            Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
            Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.




            --
             
            Dr. Abu Shariq
            Assistant Professor
            Department of Business Adminstration
            Jubail University College (Male Branch)
            Royal Commission--Jubail
            P.O. Box 10074
            Jubail Industrial City 31961
            Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
            Mobile Phone No. +966546562760
          • Lalita Ramdas
            Thanks for this well argued letter.......you are echoing the thoughts of many of us, who continue to be well wishers and supporters of AAP and Arvind. Hope all
            Message 5 of 15 , May 21, 2014
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks for this well argued letter.......you are echoing the thoughts of many of us, who continue to be well wishers and supporters of AAP and Arvind.

              Hope all these inputs will collectively work on some re thinking.

              Lalita Ramdas

              On 20-May-2014, at 6:02, "Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

               

              An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal


              Dear Arvindji,


              Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.


              First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have donegiven the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.


              Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously onmultiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?


              Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.


              Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.


              Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.


              Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.


              Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.


              Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.


              Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.


              Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.


              Thanks and regards
              A self proclaimed AAP admirer

              --
              Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
              Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
              President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
              Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
              Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.

            • Mohammad Imran
              All relevant points have been raised. AAP looks like it was a party in hurry to catch up with recognition which other parties had acquired in decades. It
              Message 6 of 15 , May 22, 2014
              • 0 Attachment
                All relevant points have been raised. AAP looks like it was a party in hurry to catch up with recognition which other parties had acquired in decades. It should sit down and analyse and work on the future. It has good prospects.


                On May 20, 2014, at : 1028PM, Daniel Mazgaonkar daniel.mazgaonkar@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                This is a very balanced and well written open letter to Arvind Kejriwalji. I fully support the points mentioned. Thank you Prof. Ujjwal ji.

                Daniel Mazgaonkar
                Sarvodaya activist


                On 20 May 2014 06:02, Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                 

                An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal


                Dear Arvindji,


                Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.


                First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.


                Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?


                Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.


                Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.


                Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than the total number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proof system of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.


                Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.


                Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.


                Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.


                Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.


                Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.


                Thanks and regards
                A self proclaimed AAP admirer

                -- 
                Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
                Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
                President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
                Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.




                -- 

                व्यक्तिगत मन की गति जहाँ कुंठित होती है वह वैकुंठ
                -----------------
                र्म - जाति - पंथ - भाषा - पक्ष - प्रांत
                विषमता का अंत याने सर्वोदय.





              • Ajay Kumar Singh
                Dear Sir There is an assumption in the letter to Arvind Kejriwal and very high expectation from Mr Kejriwal, Can you allow a non graduate to appear in Phd
                Message 7 of 15 , May 24, 2014
                • 0 Attachment

                  Dear Sir
                  There is an assumption in the letter to Arvind Kejriwal and very high expectation from Mr
                  Kejriwal,

                  Can you allow a non graduate to appear in Phd entrance , just because applicant has a good
                  intention, I think Mr Kejriwal need to complete his graduation in the politics.

                  He is a very good & ambitious person at least better than so many other politician but I
                  don't think he have any idea about the politics.

                  Thanks

                  Ajay K Singh

                  On Sat, 24 May 2014 08:27:20 +0530 wrote
                  >
























                  Excellent comments

                  Sent from my iPhone
                  On May 20, 2014, at 10:28 PM, "Daniel Mazgaonkar daniel.mazgaonkar@... [arkitectindia]"
                  wrote:







































                  This is a very balanced and well written open letter to Arvind Kejriwalji. I fully
                  support the points mentioned. Thank you Prof. Ujjwal ji.

                  Daniel Mazgaonkar
                  Sarvodaya activist



                  On 20 May 2014 06:02, Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia]
                  wrote:







































































                  An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal









                  Dear Arvindji,









                  Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP
                  in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have
                  advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said
                  that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth
                  self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes
                  from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your
                  consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a
                  stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP
                  and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.









                  First, one is bound to begin with the controversies
                  surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no
                  need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a
                  party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was
                  enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of
                  protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done
                  given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok
                  Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and

                  BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.









                  Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on
                  multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option.
                  There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor,
                  including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you
                  intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have
                  also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning,
                  why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a
                  referendum from the people who voted for you?









                  Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule
                  could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right
                  cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of
                  police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of
                  policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et
                  al.









                  Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across
                  the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government
                  in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have
                  also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream
                  well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in
                  Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat
                  or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization
                  building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But
                  sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus
                  on a few winning seats and candidates.









                  Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs
                  to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than the






                  total number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP
                  votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proof




                  system of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and
                  engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and
                  not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.









                  Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could
                  not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad
                  candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know
                  the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party
                  buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better
                  option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of
                  bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of
                  candidates could not be honored in the process.









                  Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and
                  the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia
                  and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have
                  been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here.
                  Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But
                  Delhi was ignored in the process.









                  Eighth, the manifesto of AAP
                  came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after
                  some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive
                  agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on
                  anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign
                  was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to
                  corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures
                  surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific
                  manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections
                  could not be practiced nationally.









                  Ninth, now being a more
                  relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on
                  Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make
                  every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the
                  experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians,
                  largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body
                  and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram
                  Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected
                  positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers
                  to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative
                  politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed
                  in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district
                  leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.









                  Tenth, while the whole
                  national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over
                  the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab.
                  These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with
                  virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP
                  can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP
                  fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own
                  positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation
                  in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of
                  the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local
                  positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in
                  these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine
                  pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your
                  Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.
                  Thanks and regardsA self proclaimed AAP admirer
                  --
                  Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury




                  Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.President, Advisory Board,
                  Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai.
                  Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.





                  Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.






























































                  --

                  व्यक्तिगत मन की गति जहाँ कुंठित होती है वह वैकुंठ
                  -----------------

                  धर्म - जाति - पंथ - भाषा - पक्ष - प्रांत
                  विषमता का अंत याने सर्वोदय.

















































                  Get your own FREE website, FREE domain & FREE mobile app with Company email.  
                  Know More >
                • ujjwalk.chowdhury@...
                  Yes Ajayji. I have high expectations from AAP and Kejriwal. And precisely due to the fact that he has low or no experience in politics of the day! However,
                  Message 8 of 15 , May 25, 2014
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Yes Ajayji. I have high expectations from AAP and Kejriwal. And precisely due to the fact that he has low or no experience in 'politics' of the day! However, as written in the Open Letter, there are several mistakes committed and I hope that all of them learn. As for educational comment, incidentally the top rung of AAP is highly qualified and otherwise established in various fields so long. Mistakes apart, their 16 months rise is phenomenal. Lets see how they tackle the next six months. Crucial.
                    Sent from BlackBerry® on Airtel

                    From: "'Ajay Kumar Singh' ajayedu@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sender: arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: 24 May 2014 19:44:03 -0000
                    To: <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com>
                    ReplyTo: arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: Re: [Arkitect India] An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal

                     


                    Dear Sir
                    There is an assumption in the letter to Arvind Kejriwal and very high expectation from Mr
                    Kejriwal,

                    Can you allow a non graduate to appear in Phd entrance , just because applicant has a good
                    intention, I think Mr Kejriwal need to complete his graduation in the politics.

                    He is a very good ambitious person at least better than so many other politician but I
                    don't think he have any idea about the politics.

                    Thanks

                    Ajay K Singh

                    On Sat, 24 May 2014 08:27:20 +0530 wrote

                    >
























                    Excellent comments

                    Sent from my iPhone
                    On May 20, 2014, at 10:28 PM, "Daniel Mazgaonkar daniel.mazgaonkar@... [arkitectindia]"
                    wrote:







































                    This is a very balanced and well written open letter to Arvind Kejriwalji. I fully
                    support the points mentioned. Thank you Prof. Ujjwal ji.

                    Daniel Mazgaonkar
                    Sarvodaya activist



                    On 20 May 2014 06:02, Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia]
                    wrote:







































































                    An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal









                    Dear Arvindji,









                    Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP
                    in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have
                    advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said
                    that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth
                    self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes
                    from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your
                    consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a
                    stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP
                    and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.









                    First, one is bound to begin with the controversies
                    surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no
                    need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a
                    party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was
                    enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of
                    protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done
                    given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok
                    Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and

                    BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.









                    Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on
                    multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option.
                    There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor,
                    including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you
                    intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have
                    also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning,
                    why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a
                    referendum from the people who voted for you?









                    Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule
                    could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right
                    cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of
                    police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of
                    policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et
                    al.









                    Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across
                    the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government
                    in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have
                    also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream
                    well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in
                    Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat
                    or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization
                    building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But
                    sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus
                    on a few winning seats and candidates.









                    Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs
                    to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than the






                    total number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP
                    votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proof




                    system of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and
                    engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and
                    not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.









                    Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could
                    not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad
                    candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know
                    the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party
                    buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better
                    option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of
                    bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of
                    candidates could not be honored in the process.









                    Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and
                    the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia
                    and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have
                    been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here.
                    Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But
                    Delhi was ignored in the process.









                    Eighth, the manifesto of AAP
                    came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after
                    some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive
                    agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on
                    anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign
                    was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to
                    corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures
                    surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific
                    manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections
                    could not be practiced nationally.









                    Ninth, now being a more
                    relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on
                    Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make
                    every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the
                    experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians,
                    largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body
                    and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram
                    Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected
                    positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers
                    to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative
                    politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed
                    in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district
                    leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.









                    Tenth, while the whole
                    national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over
                    the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab.
                    These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with
                    virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP
                    can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP
                    fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own
                    positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation
                    in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of
                    the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local
                    positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in
                    these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine
                    pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your
                    Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.
                    Thanks and regardsA self proclaimed AAP admirer
                    --
                    Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury




                    Senior Education Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata Kathmandu.President, Advisory Board,
                    Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai.
                    Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media Communication Dean, SIU, Pune.





                    Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.






























































                    --

                    व्यक्तिगत मन की गति जहाँ कुंठित होती है वह वैकुंठ
                    -----------------

                    धर्म - जाति - पंथ - भाषा - पक्ष - प्रांत
                    विषमता का अंत याने सर्वोदय.

















































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                  • Pankaj Jain
                    In general, good intentions are of little value in the absence of capability to translate intentions into actions that provide results. Similarly, talking well
                    Message 9 of 15 , May 25, 2014
                    • 0 Attachment
                      In general, good intentions are of little value in the absence of capability to translate intentions into actions that provide results.

                      Similarly, talking well is no indication of the capacity to walk the talk, otherwise the IIT/ IIM professors would be greatest industry leaders.

                      Most of us do not know about Mr. Kejeriwal's record of doing things? Anti corruption movement was certainly not his, though he was clearly a fellow traveller. The same was the case of his association with RTI campaign. Would someone like to share with us the record of NGO that he headed or his record as IT officer? Afterall, we do know the record of Ms. Bedi as police officer, Ms. Patkat as NBA leader, Ms. Aruna Roy as RTI campaigner and  of Anna as Ralegaon transformer and anti-corruption crusader, all of which are fairly discussed and known, widely. We should look at action record of key leaders of AAP before reposing any faith in their capability to mean anything other than effective participants of TV based Nukkad conversations.

                      Pankaj

                      Pankaj


                      On Sunday, May 25, 2014 8:17 PM, "Abu Shariq shariqomair@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                       
                      Dear Prof Ujjwal
                      I congratulate you for your balanced, positive and comprehensive critique of AAP. I would like to add one more point. AAP should give equal emphasis to the politics of social justice as it gives to corruption. AAP should also focus on developing leaders from the marginalised castes and communities. In this way AAP will be able increase its depth in the Indian polity.


                      On Tue, May 20, 2014 at 3:32 AM, Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                       
                      An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal

                      Dear Arvindji,

                      Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.

                      First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.

                      Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?

                      Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.

                      Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.

                      Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.

                      Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.

                      Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.

                      Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.

                      Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.

                      Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAPfritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.

                      Thanks and regards
                      A self proclaimed AAP admirer

                      --
                      Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
                      Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
                      President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
                      Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                      Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.



                      --
                       
                      Dr. Abu Shariq
                      Assistant Professor
                      Department of Business Adminstration
                      Jubail University College (Male Branch)
                      Royal Commission--Jubail
                      P.O. Box 10074
                      Jubail Industrial City 31961
                      Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
                      Mobile Phone No. +966546562760


                    • ujjwalk.chowdhury@...
                      Thanks Lalitaji. I want to reiterate that I strongly stand with AAP and do not consider it the task of Arvind or Yogendra alone but each of us. I would ve hope
                      Message 10 of 15 , May 26, 2014
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Thanks Lalitaji. I want to reiterate that I strongly stand with AAP and do not consider it the task of Arvind or Yogendra alone but each of us. I would ve hope Shazia to be evolving this experiment from inside and not leaving it. However, lots of functional and practice changes are needed within AAP and Swaraj has to be applied at all levels. Just now direct public contacts across Delhi, Haryana, Punjab, Maharashtra and Karnataka are important and internal strengthening rather than much media posturing.
                        Sent from BlackBerry® on Airtel

                        From: "Lalita Ramdas lramdas@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sender: arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Thu, 22 May 2014 11:50:45 +0530
                        To: <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com>
                        ReplyTo: arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com
                        Cc: arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com<arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com>
                        Subject: Re: [Arkitect India] An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal

                         

                        Thanks for this well argued letter.......you are echoing the thoughts of many of us, who continue to be well wishers and supporters of AAP and Arvind.

                        Hope all these inputs will collectively work on some re thinking.

                        Lalita Ramdas

                        On 20-May-2014, at 6:02, "Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                         

                        An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal


                        Dear Arvindji,


                        Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.


                        First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have donegiven the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.


                        Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously onmultiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?


                        Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.


                        Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.


                        Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.


                        Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.


                        Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.


                        Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.


                        Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.


                        Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.


                        Thanks and regards
                        A self proclaimed AAP admirer

                        --
                        Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
                        Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
                        President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
                        Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                        Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.

                      • Harpreet
                        I wish AAP all the best and support the movement for justified governance than mere politics! harpreet ... I wish AAP all the best and support the movement for
                        Message 11 of 15 , May 26, 2014
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I wish AAP all the best and support the movement for justified governance than mere politics! 

                          harpreet

                          On 22-May-2014, at 11:50 am, "Lalita Ramdas lramdas@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                           

                          Thanks for this well argued letter.......you are echoing the thoughts of many of us, who continue to be well wishers and supporters of AAP and Arvind.

                          Hope all these inputs will collectively work on some re thinking.

                          Lalita Ramdas

                          On 20-May-2014, at 6:02, "Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                           

                          An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal


                          Dear Arvindji,


                          Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.


                          First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely noneed to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was aparty with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have donegiven the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.


                          Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously onmultiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?


                          Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.


                          Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focuson a few winning seats and candidates.


                          Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.


                          Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.


                          Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should havebeen announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.


                          Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition tocorruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specificmanifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.


                          Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.


                          Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.


                          Thanks and regards
                          A self proclaimed AAP admirer

                          --
                          Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
                          Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
                          President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
                          Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                          Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.

                        • Daniel Mazgaonkar
                          then, my friend, why not also have a deep and closer look at all the current central ministers...................it would be a very interesting study, i am
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jun 2, 2014
                          • 0 Attachment
                            then, my friend, why not also have a deep and closer look at all the current central ministers...................it would be a very interesting study, i am sure. and then why not begin with the leader of the ministers himself. and of course, A K yes, let us closely study his life and work.

                            daniel


                            On 26 May 2014 08:31, Pankaj Jain pjain2002@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                             

                            In general, good intentions are of little value in the absence of capability to translate intentions into actions that provide results.

                            Similarly, talking well is no indication of the capacity to walk the talk, otherwise the IIT/ IIM professors would be greatest industry leaders.

                            Most of us do not know about Mr. Kejeriwal's record of doing things? Anti corruption movement was certainly not his, though he was clearly a fellow traveller. The same was the case of his association with RTI campaign. Would someone like to share with us the record of NGO that he headed or his record as IT officer? Afterall, we do know the record of Ms. Bedi as police officer, Ms. Patkat as NBA leader, Ms. Aruna Roy as RTI campaigner and  of Anna as Ralegaon transformer and anti-corruption crusader, all of which are fairly discussed and known, widely. We should look at action record of key leaders of AAP before reposing any faith in their capability to mean anything other than effective participants of TV based Nukkad conversations.

                            Pankaj

                            Pankaj


                            On Sunday, May 25, 2014 8:17 PM, "Abu Shariq shariqomair@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                             
                            Dear Prof Ujjwal
                            I congratulate you for your balanced, positive and comprehensive critique of AAP. I would like to add one more point. AAP should give equal emphasis to the politics of social justice as it gives to corruption. AAP should also focus on developing leaders from the marginalised castes and communities. In this way AAP will be able increase its depth in the Indian polity.


                            On Tue, May 20, 2014 at 3:32 AM, Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                             
                            An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal

                            Dear Arvindji,

                            Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.

                            First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.

                            Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?

                            Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.

                            Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.

                            Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members andengaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.

                            Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.

                            Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.

                            Eighth, the manifesto of AAPcame very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.

                            Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.

                            Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAPfritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.

                            Thanks and regards
                            A self proclaimed AAP admirer

                            --
                            Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
                            Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
                            President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
                            Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                            Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.



                            --
                             
                            Dr. Abu Shariq
                            Assistant Professor
                            Department of Business Adminstration
                            Jubail University College (Male Branch)
                            Royal Commission--Jubail
                            P.O. Box 10074
                            Jubail Industrial City 31961
                            Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
                            Mobile Phone No. +966546562760





                            --

                            व्यक्तिगत मन की गति जहाँ कुंठित होती है वह वैकुंठ
                            -----------------
                            र्म - जाति - पंथ - भाषा - पक्ष - प्रांत
                            विषमता का अंत याने सर्वोदय.



                          • Kaleem Kawaja
                            Pankaj Jain You made good comments. I have posted your above comments on the AAP facebook page. Let us see what we hear from them. Kaleem Kawaja On Sun, May
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jun 3, 2014
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Pankaj Jain
                              You made good comments.  I have posted your above comments on  the AAP facebook page.  Let us see what we hear from them. 
                              Kaleem Kawaja


                              On Sun, May 25, 2014 at 11:01 PM, Pankaj Jain pjain2002@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                               

                              In general, good intentions are of little value in the absence of capability to translate intentions into actions that provide results.

                              Similarly, talking well is no indication of the capacity to walk the talk, otherwise the IIT/ IIM professors would be greatest industry leaders.

                              Most of us do not know about Mr. Kejeriwal's record of doing things? Anti corruption movement was certainly not his, though he was clearly a fellow traveller. The same was the case of his association with RTI campaign. Would someone like to share with us the record of NGO that he headed or his record as IT officer? Afterall, we do know the record of Ms. Bedi as police officer, Ms. Patkat as NBA leader, Ms. Aruna Roy as RTI campaigner and  of Anna as Ralegaon transformer and anti-corruption crusader, all of which are fairly discussed and known, widely. We should look at action record of key leaders of AAP before reposing any faith in their capability to mean anything other than effective participants of TV based Nukkad conversations.

                              Pankaj

                              Pankaj


                              On Sunday, May 25, 2014 8:17 PM, "Abu Shariq shariqomair@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                               
                              Dear Prof Ujjwal
                              I congratulate you for your balanced, positive and comprehensive critique of AAP. I would like to add one more point. AAP should give equal emphasis to the politics of social justice as it gives to corruption. AAP should also focus on developing leaders from the marginalised castes and communities. In this way AAP will be able increase its depth in the Indian polity.


                              On Tue, May 20, 2014 at 3:32 AM, Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                               
                              An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal

                              Dear Arvindji,

                              Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.

                              First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.

                              Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?

                              Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.

                              Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.

                              Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.

                              Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.

                              Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.

                              Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.

                              Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.

                              Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAPfritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.

                              Thanks and regards
                              A self proclaimed AAP admirer

                              --
                              Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
                              Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
                              President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
                              Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                              Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.



                              --
                               
                              Dr. Abu Shariq
                              Assistant Professor
                              Department of Business Adminstration
                              Jubail University College (Male Branch)
                              Royal Commission--Jubail
                              P.O. Box 10074
                              Jubail Industrial City 31961
                              Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
                              Mobile Phone No. +966546562760



                            • Sharad Behar
                              I endorse yours and LalitaJI’s views and hopes. With Warm Regards, Yours Sincerely, Sharad Behar E4/12, ARERA COLONY, BHOPAL-462016 (0755)-2423220, Cell
                              Message 14 of 15 , Jun 5, 2014
                              • 0 Attachment

                                I endorse yours and LalitaJI’s views and hopes.

                                 

                                With Warm Regards,

                                Yours Sincerely,

                                Sharad Behar

                                E4/12, ARERA COLONY,

                                BHOPAL-462016

                                (0755)-2423220, Cell 094250-19425

                                                    And

                                253,Near Aam Bagicha, Sundar Nager

                                RAIPUR-492013

                                 

                                 

                                From: arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com]
                                Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 8:44 AM
                                To: arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [Arkitect India] An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal

                                 

                                 

                                Thanks Lalitaji. I want to reiterate that I strongly stand with AAP and do not consider it the task of Arvind or Yogendra alone but each of us. I would ve hope Shazia to be evolving this experiment from inside and not leaving it. However, lots of functional and practice changes are needed within AAP and Swaraj has to be applied at all levels. Just now direct public contacts across Delhi, Haryana, Punjab, Maharashtra and Karnataka are important and internal strengthening rather than much media posturing.

                                Sent from BlackBerry® on Airtel


                                From: "Lalita Ramdas lramdas@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com>

                                Date: Thu, 22 May 2014 11:50:45 +0530

                                Subject: Re: [Arkitect India] An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal

                                 

                                 

                                Thanks for this well argued letter.......you are echoing the thoughts of many of us, who continue to be well wishers and supporters of AAP and Arvind.

                                 

                                Hope all these inputs will collectively work on some re thinking.

                                 

                                Lalita Ramdas


                                On 20-May-2014, at 6:02, "Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                 

                                An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal

                                 

                                Dear Arvindji,

                                 

                                Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.

                                 

                                First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress and BJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.

                                 

                                Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?

                                 

                                Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.

                                 

                                Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.

                                 

                                Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than the total number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proof system of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members and engaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.

                                 

                                Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle of bottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection of candidates could not be honored in the process.

                                 

                                Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.

                                 

                                Eighth, the manifesto of AAP came very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.

                                 

                                Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant body and a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.

                                 

                                Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAP fritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.

                                 

                                Thanks and regards

                                A self proclaimed AAP admirer

                                 

                                --

                                Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury

                                Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.

                                President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
                                Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                                Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.

                              • Kaleem Kawaja
                                Kejriwal ranks significantly below prominent social activists like Medha Patkar, Aruna Roy, Iron Sharmila, SP Udaykumar, Anna Hazare and some others. Please
                                Message 15 of 15 , Jun 10, 2014
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Kejriwal ranks significantly below prominent social activists like Medha Patkar, Aruna Roy, Iron Sharmila, SP Udaykumar, Anna Hazare and some others.  Please note that he is only 44 years old; thus he is 10 to 20 years younger than other reputed activists.  His career has been in fighting corruption from the time that he was about 30 years old.  While he was an IRS officer he started his NGO Parivartan.  He kept working as an IRS officer and also organizing rallies against corruption in Delhi.  Then he gave up his IRS job as an Income Tax Commissioner to dedicate himself full time to his NGO.  At that time he received the presitigous  Magsaysay award.  It was he who formed IAC (India Against Corruption) and brought Anna Hazare to Delhi and organized Hazare's manmoth rallies in Delhi. 
                                   
                                  They became very popular but failed to make any dent in corruption or even get a strong Lokpal bill passed in parliament.  Congress and BJP joined hands to thwart Hazare's Lokpal bill and instead passed a very diluted version of the same in the parliament.  That is when Kejriwal decided to form a party and enter electoral politics to cleanse it of corrupt elements.
                                   
                                  All these very distinguished social activists have dome yeoman work, yet their impact on society has been very limited because the powerful parties in parliament and State Assemblies have ignored them and their demands.   Hence the need to remove criminals and corrupt politicians from politics is the biggest need.  In the 2014 election again many corrupt politicians have won and the new BJP govt itself is beholden to those corrupt politicians and super rich industrialists.  30% members of parloiament now are corrupt politicians.
                                   
                                  In the next 5 years Kejriwal and AAP should dedicate themselves to gradually getting into power in small  states like Delhi, Punjab, Haryana by mobilizing the public.  They have to struggle media owned by the super rich people and big parties, who are dividing people on the basis of religion.  In other states like Maharashtra, Karnatak they can elect good number of MLAs to carry on the struggle.  Thus only gradually AAP's message will convince people to vote for them.
                                   
                                  AAP has to develp coherent policies on economics, defense, foreign affairs, law & order etc.  So that voters know that AAP is a coherent party with defined policies, not just a street protester.    By showing achievements in small states they can show the bigger states what can be accomplished.  It is a very long and ardous struggle as corruption and injustice have now become the very basic fabric of the nation.  The number of corrupt people has grown much in the last 30 years and many average people believe that it is a way of life and since it can not be removed it is ok.  They give bribes and take bribes and see nothing wrong in it.  In their mindset this is the Indian system.  Just as in Nigeria, South Africa, Pakistan, Bangladesh etc this lifestyle is accepted as the system of the country.
                                   
                                  Kaleem Kawaja


                                  On Tue, Jun 3, 2014 at 12:08 AM, Daniel Mazgaonkar daniel.mazgaonkar@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                                   

                                  then, my friend, why not also have a deep and closer look at all the current central ministers...................it would be a very interesting study, i am sure. and then why not begin with the leader of the ministers himself. and of course, A K yes, let us closely study his life and work.

                                  daniel


                                  On 26 May 2014 08:31, Pankaj Jain pjain2002@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                                   

                                  In general, good intentions are of little value in the absence of capability to translate intentions into actions that provide results.

                                  Similarly, talking well is no indication of the capacity to walk the talk, otherwise the IIT/ IIM professors would be greatest industry leaders.

                                  Most of us do not know about Mr. Kejeriwal's record of doing things? Anti corruption movement was certainly not his, though he was clearly a fellow traveller. The same was the case of his association with RTI campaign. Would someone like to share with us the record of NGO that he headed or his record as IT officer? Afterall, we do know the record of Ms. Bedi as police officer, Ms. Patkat as NBA leader, Ms. Aruna Roy as RTI campaigner and  of Anna as Ralegaon transformer and anti-corruption crusader, all of which are fairly discussed and known, widely. We should look at action record of key leaders of AAP before reposing any faith in their capability to mean anything other than effective participants of TV based Nukkad conversations.

                                  Pankaj

                                  Pankaj


                                  On Sunday, May 25, 2014 8:17 PM, "Abu Shariq shariqomair@... [arkitectindia]" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                                   
                                  Dear Prof Ujjwal
                                  I congratulate you for your balanced, positive and comprehensive critique of AAP. I would like to add one more point. AAP should give equal emphasis to the politics of social justice as it gives to corruption. AAP should also focus on developing leaders from the marginalised castes and communities. In this way AAP will be able increase its depth in the Indian polity.


                                  On Tue, May 20, 2014 at 3:32 AM, Ujjwal K Chowdhury ujjwalk.chowdhury@... [arkitectindia] <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                                   
                                  An Open Letter to Arvind Kejriwal

                                  Dear Arvindji,

                                  Let me first note that I have always held that coming in AAP in Indian politics has been in the best interests of our democracy and I have advocated support for this political experiment from the start. Having said that, today, I feel AAP is in a state of disarray, and needs an in-depth self-introspection and need to re-discover itself. Still having a lot of hopes from AAP, I cannot stop myself from mentioning the following for your consideration for whatever they are worth, more so because the need of a stronger AAP across India is even more relevant today with a super powerful BJP and decimating Congress along with a few other regional parties.

                                  First, one is bound to begin with the controversies surrounding your 49 days rule in Delhi. In my opinion, there was absolutely no need to come to power in the first place having 28 seats where there was a party with 32 seats unable to assume power themselves. Your minority status was enough for you to avoid getting into the Congress trap if you were sure of protecting your MLAs from being poached by BJP, which they would not have done given the Lok Sabha election ahead. And, having Delhi election along with Lok Sabha election, with a moral high after rejecting ‘support’ from Congress andBJP, could have proved to be a better bet for AAP than what turned out to be.

                                  Second, if you have assumed power, working simultaneously on multiple fronts and not getting stuck with one law would have been a better option. There was absolutely no harm in sending the draft Janlokpal Bill to the Governor, including the Swaraj Bill too, which would have shown the world what you intended to do on the legal front. Any prevention from his office would have also given you the reason to politically fight back. And if you are resigning, why did not you do it in the same way when you came to power, that is, taking a referendum from the people who voted for you?

                                  Third, on hindsight, the challenges during the 49 days rule could have been tackled better: more realistic handling of the very right cudgels against drug-sex menace in Khirkee Extension, dharna on issues of police inaction and government control rather than action against a couple of policemen, public positioning of your right steps in water and power issues, et al.

                                  Fourth, the decision of contesting Lok Sabha elections across the nation was right, but it could have been better fought with a pro-people government in Delhi and focus on some selected seats across India, where you could have also given time to many seats. There has surely been a Modi tsunami on a dream well sold by a liberally funded BJP. But still focusing on say five seats in Maharashtra or four seats in Bihar or three seats in Odisha or three in Gujarat or Rajasthan would have helped the cause better. I understand the organization building or getting 6% of votes in maximum states were important purposes. But sending some more MPs to Parliament could have been better achieved with focus on a few winning seats and candidates.

                                  Fifth, the entire mechanism of AAP general membership needs to be relooked into. The party claimed more members in the country than thetotal number of votes polled and NOTA in most states number higher than AAP votes. These cannot be attributed to Modi mania at all. Better full proofsystem of membership coupled with immediate reaching out to the new members andengaging them locally must be developed to make it a productive exercise and not just a self-congratulatory belief of strength.

                                  Sixth, the Delhi process of selection of candidates could not be replicated at the national level, and there obviously have been many bad candidates selected with even dubious or not-so-distinct backgrounds. I know the time limit you had, but it also says that under pressures the party buckles. And that is no good. Lesser better candidates will make a better option than higher average candidates. Also, your own avowed principle ofbottoms-up approach with volunteers having the highest say in selection ofcandidates could not be honored in the process.

                                  Seventh, there obviously has been less focus on Delhi and the electorate of your first supporting state taken for granted. Manish Sisodia and Shazia Ilmi should have been candidates in Delhi. The candidates should have been announced much earlier, and you should have given more personal time here. Kumar and you fighting Rahul and Modi was a brilliant idea for visibility. But Delhi was ignored in the process.

                                  Eighth, the manifesto of AAPcame very late, just few days before the other national parties, and even after some regional parties. And the entire campaign did not focus on your positive agenda of participative eco-friendly poor-friendly development, but only on anti-Modiism and a feeble anti-Congress rhetoric. The negative tone of campaign was a faulty approach indeed. Blending pro-people agenda with opposition to corruption, communalism, crony capitalism and dynasty rule in equal measures surely was a better strategy. Your stellar idea of constituency-specific manifesto was hardly done in most places. The best ideas of Delhi elections could not be practiced nationally.

                                  Ninth, now being a more relevant time for AAP, the party must quickly expand and further empower on Swaraj principles the National Executive, Political Affairs Committee, and make every district and state committee within the next 45 days based on the experience of the last 100 days. You have a good cadre of half a million Indians, largely young, across India, and each of them can be taken in a relevant bodyand a region given to each to own up for their work locally. From Gram Panchayat to Parliament, Indian democracy allows more than 16 lacs elected positions today. You may still require more than a million dedicated volunteers to reach out to all of these positions. Your brand of alternative participative politics must be seen and felt in every village and town and not just discussed in media, and you alone seen in television. Active state and district leadership of AAP is the crying need of the moment.

                                  Tenth, while the whole national structure of AAP needs to be institutionalized fast, the focus over the next 150 days needs to be on Delhi, Haryana, Maharashtra and even Punjab. These states have the highest visibility and possibility of AAP and with virtual decimation and consequent demoralization of Congress everywhere, AAP can legitimately take the opposition space quite effectively. But let not AAPfritter away energy in opposing a few leaders, rather focus more on its own positive campaign, raising pro people issues, ensuring people’s participation in welfare-based politics and developing leadership with clear goals in each of the talukas or localities of these four states of India. Emphasis on local positive issue based campaign a la Punjab this time can work wonders for AAP in these four states in the next five months, and give the nation its genuine pro-people alternative that India needs today more than ever before. Your Punjab success this time amidst Modi-fication can be your best lesson.

                                  Thanks and regards
                                  A self proclaimed AAP admirer

                                  --
                                  Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
                                  Senior Education & Media Consultant, Delhi, Kolkata & Kathmandu.
                                  President, Advisory Board, Whistling Woods School of Communication, Mumbai. 
                                  Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                                  Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.



                                  --
                                   
                                  Dr. Abu Shariq
                                  Assistant Professor
                                  Department of Business Adminstration
                                  Jubail University College (Male Branch)
                                  Royal Commission--Jubail
                                  P.O. Box 10074
                                  Jubail Industrial City 31961
                                  Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
                                  Mobile Phone No. +966546562760





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