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Re: I was gang raped. I wasn't alone, I wasn't drunk, I wasn't provocatively dressed.

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  • Ci Veterans
    This is all hue and cry ! where does it lead ! Any solutions !Can you suggest with practical implementation strategy too ! if not are you ready to listen to
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 23, 2013
      This is all hue and cry ! where does it lead ! Any solutions !Can you suggest with practical implementation strategy too ! if not are you ready to listen to solutions and pledge to assist in implementing strategy to have concrete results, rather than hue and cry.

      --- In arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com, Paadam Pm <paadam.pm@...> wrote:
      >
      > http://m.firstpost.com/mumbai/shame-why-mumbai-photojournalist-gangrape-violates-all-women-1054963.html?page=3
      >
      > Friday, August 23rd 04:53 PM IST
      > Shame: Why Mumbai photojournalist gangrape violates all women
      >
      > She is a survivor, I am a victim. As are thousands of women who aren't
      > safe in a country that demands of them patriotism, sacrifices and
      > taxes.
      >
      >
      > by Deepanjana Pal 23 Aug 11:05 am IST
      >
      >
      > At 6 pm yesterday, a gangrape took place in central Mumbai. News of
      > this terrible incident reached us a few hours later, after the young
      > woman - a photojournalist - was taken to a hospital and reports of her
      > rape appeared in a couple of city publications. (See here and here.)
      > Predictably and understandably, outrage swelled through social media.
      > Along with expressions of shock, horror, grief and disbelief, there
      > was also curiosity.
      >
      > It seems everyone wants to know what precisely happened and to whom it
      > happened. How old is she? Where does she work? What was she wearing?
      > How many people raped her? Where was she raped? How long did they rape
      > her? What did her companion do? What kind of work makes a 'girl' go
      > walking around an area 'known' to be frequented by drug addicts? So
      > great was the curiosity that some, thinking themselves the Indian
      > Twitter equivalent of Wikileaks, decided to let their followers know
      > details about the raped woman. After a few minutes, better sense
      > prevailed and the tweets were deleted, but hashtags and retweets
      > remain.
      >
      > Perhaps it's understandable. This is a horrific, shocking incident and
      > it's easy for paranoid minds to confuse curiosity with perverseness
      > and/or voyeurism.
      >
      > So I'm here to answer the regular questions.
      >
      > Yesterday evening, at around 6pm, I was gang raped. I wasn't alone, I
      > wasn't drunk, I wasn't provocatively dressed. I was doing what most
      > people do at that hour: I was working. I'd done everything that girls
      > and women are told to do in order to stay safe - it wasn't dark, a
      > male colleague was with me, I wasn't in a particularly disreputable
      > part of town - and it didn't help. I was raped by five men and then
      > left there, at the site of the crime.
      >
      > You can find out all about me - where I work, what I like, who I know
      > - by putting my name in Google. I also tweet a lot, so going through
      > my Twitter timeline will give you many details about me. If you want
      > to know what I look like, do an image search with my full name or look
      > in Facebook.
      >
      > Now that you've got all you need to imagine the gangrape better, I
      > have a few questions for which I'd love answers.
      >
      > The Mumbai Police has rounded up nine suspects, which is heartening,
      > but this incident isn't over even if my rapists are among those nine.
      > How long before the guilty are caught and sentenced? Tell me about the
      > men who did this to me. How old are they? What do they do? Why did
      > they think that a woman is fair game for rape? Did they enjoy it? Have
      > they raped other women? How did they think that they could get away
      > with raping me? What did they do afterwards? Are they actually going
      > to get away with it?
      >
      > Perhaps it's because the woman who was raped yesterday is a
      > journalist, or because I'm often walking through unbustling streets at
      > and after 6pm, or because reports of rape are becoming way too
      > regular, but this latest incident feels like radioactive lead in my
      > blood.
      >
      > I, like every woman in Mumbai, have held on desperately to the hope
      > that women are safe in this city. Yesterday, that faith was brutally
      > violated. I was not subjected to the terrible ordeal that the young
      > woman suffered, but the rapists made me and every other working woman
      > in Mumbai bleed when they gangraped one of our tribe.
      >
      > The dictionary defines 'victim' as a person who has been "harmed,
      > injured, or killed as a result of a crime, accident, or other event or
      > action." The journalist who was gang raped yesterday has been
      > seriously injured, but she's no victim. She's given the police enough
      > details for them to be able to round up suspects. She has valour and
      > strength and all our prayers for a complete recovery of body and
      > spirit. She is a survivor, I am a victim. As are thousands of women
      > who aren't safe in a country that demands of them patriotism,
      > sacrifices and taxes.
      >
      > It might have been better if we were numbed by the constant reports of
      > violence committed against women, but I'm not immune to the toxicity
      > of rape yet. So I have one question: where is a woman safe in India?
      >
      > Statistics tell us the largest percentage of sexual predators in India
      > lurk within family and close friends, so homes are dangerous spaces.
      > The streets are unsafe even when it's light and you have company.
      > Public transport is the least secure because curtained by crowds,
      > sexual harassment is painfully easy. Private transport is so fraught
      > with danger that certain car models are popularly known as
      > 'rape-mobiles'.
      >
      > So where would you have us women go?
      >
      > No, I wasn't really raped yesterday. It was someone else, but I'm
      > making this about me not just because I'm sickened by voyeurism
      > masquerading as debate, but also because these crimes inflict
      > physically suffering upon one woman but are committed against all
      > women in this city and country. It is personal. It could have been any
      > one of us. It happened to her, yes, but a tiny fraction of her
      > experience was felt by all of us working women in India.
      >
      > What would you have us do to be and feel safe?
      >
      > To the police, the legal system, the political establishment, the men
      > who think women are fair game for rape and the people who foster
      > rapists: what will you do to make sure we're not violated again and
      > again and again?
      > --
      > To read all the issues of paadam, Pl visit our web www.paadam.in &
      > blog www.paadam-pm.blogspot.com and leave your comments.
      >
      > Regards
      > A.Narayanan (98403 93581)
      > Editor
      > Paadam, Monthly Magazine in Tamil for Development Politics
      > 2/628, Rapid Nagar,
      > Gerugambakkam
      > Chennai - 602 101.
      >
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