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Re: [भारत-चिँतन:16017] Two Muslim students win all 3 Sanskrit medals in Gujarat University

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  • labour collective
    thanks Sadanandji for the news. however, this is not a rare incident. the kerala university degree sanskrit rank was scored by a devout muslim girl two years
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 7, 2013
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      thanks Sadanandji for the news. however, this is not a rare incident. the kerala university degree sanskrit rank was scored by a devout muslim girl two years ago...there are many muslims who study sanskrit. kerala university sanskrit dept has a muslim lady prof (also, head of the islamic studies is a Hindu). I have heard that jamat e islami provides scholorship for muslim students to study sanskrit...ordinary life is not guided by media propaganda or the hindutwa hate speech
      rasheed

      On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 1:08 PM, Sadanand Patwardhan <2sadanand@...> wrote:
      Now it can’t get better, can it? ^^Two of the medals for Sanskrit were won by Taiyab Sheikh, a student of Y S Arts and Commerce college in Devgadh Baria in Panchmahals district. The third went to Yasminbanu Kothari of the Adiwasi Arts and Commerce college in Santrampur in the interior of the state's tribal belt. ^^. The hope for ancient *Hindu*  or shall we say Vedic language at least in part lies with these Muslim youth from Modi’s Gujarat. What a twist in the tale!!
       
      Sadanand
       

      Defying stereotypes, a Muslim boy and girl have bagged all three medals instituted for the BA course in the ancient Indian language by the Gujarat University.

      Two of the medals for Sanskrit were won by Taiyab Sheikh, a student of Y S Arts and Commerce college in Devgadh Baria in Panchmahals district. The third went to Yasminbanu Kothari of the Adiwasi Arts and Commerce college in Santrampur in the interior of the state's tribal belt.

      Sheikh got 75.5 per cent marks and Kothari 68.5 per cent. The medals were awarded at the convocation Tuesday.

      Sheikh, 23, who is now studying for a B.Ed. degree in a Godhra college, said he was inspired to learn Sanskrit after hearing stories from the Ramayana and Mahabharat told by his teachers in primary school in his village of Tokarwa.

      He said he wants to be a post-graduate in Sanskrit and pursue teaching it as a career. Sheikh enrolled himself for a BA degree with Sanskrit as his main subject as he failed to get a teaching job in a primary school after doing a teachers training course.

      His elder brother is a head master in a government primary school and there was no opposition in the family to him studying Sanskrit. "My parents, who are farmers and not educated, only wanted me to perform well," Sheikh said.

      Kothari said she developed a liking for Sanskrit when she was in class 12. The daughter of a fruit-seller who studied up to class 12, she too said she did not face any opposition to her choice of the language. "In fact, my father and his friend Rafiq Sheikh, a college teacher, encouraged me to study it," she said.

      Kothari teaches at a primary school in Santrampur and like Sheikh, she too wants to do an MA in Sanskrit and work as a teacher.

      "A language does not belong to any community. Anyone can learn any language provided he or she has interest in it," said J R Machchi, Sheikh's Sanskrit teacher.

      "Muslim boys and girls diversifying into other educational fields is a good sign," added J S Bandukwala, a retired Physics professor from M S University who runs Zidni Ilma Trust, which promotes professional and technical education among poor Muslim students.

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    • harpreet kaur jass
      Defying these stereotypes and choosing knowledge, humanity over cliches is something remarkable about human race. Indeed good and there are example of
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 7, 2013
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        Defying these stereotypes and choosing knowledge, humanity over cliches is something remarkable about human race. Indeed good and there are example of non-Muslims excelling in Urdu or Arabic. we need to direct our observations to these instances as well. thanks! 


        On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 1:08 PM, Sadanand Patwardhan <2Sadanand@...> wrote:
         

        Now it can’t get better, can it? ^^Two of the medals for Sanskrit were won by Taiyab Sheikh, a student of Y S Arts and Commerce college in Devgadh Baria in Panchmahals district. The third went to Yasminbanu Kothari of the Adiwasi Arts and Commerce college in Santrampur in the interior of the state's tribal belt. ^^. The hope for ancient *Hindu*  or shall we say Vedic language at least in part lies with these Muslim youth from Modi’s Gujarat. What a twist in the tale!!
         
        Sadanand
         

        Defying stereotypes, a Muslim boy and girl have bagged all three medals instituted for the BA course in the ancient Indian language by the Gujarat University.

        Two of the medals for Sanskrit were won by Taiyab Sheikh, a student of Y S Arts and Commerce college in Devgadh Baria in Panchmahals district. The third went to Yasminbanu Kothari of the Adiwasi Arts and Commerce college in Santrampur in the interior of the state's tribal belt.

        Sheikh got 75.5 per cent marks and Kothari 68.5 per cent. The medals were awarded at the convocation Tuesday.

        Sheikh, 23, who is now studying for a B.Ed. degree in a Godhra college, said he was inspired to learn Sanskrit after hearing stories from the Ramayana and Mahabharat told by his teachers in primary school in his village of Tokarwa.

        He said he wants to be a post-graduate in Sanskrit and pursue teaching it as a career. Sheikh enrolled himself for a BA degree with Sanskrit as his main subject as he failed to get a teaching job in a primary school after doing a teachers training course.

        His elder brother is a head master in a government primary school and there was no opposition in the family to him studying Sanskrit. "My parents, who are farmers and not educated, only wanted me to perform well," Sheikh said.

        Kothari said she developed a liking for Sanskrit when she was in class 12. The daughter of a fruit-seller who studied up to class 12, she too said she did not face any opposition to her choice of the language. "In fact, my father and his friend Rafiq Sheikh, a college teacher, encouraged me to study it," she said.

        Kothari teaches at a primary school in Santrampur and like Sheikh, she too wants to do an MA in Sanskrit and work as a teacher.

        "A language does not belong to any community. Anyone can learn any language provided he or she has interest in it," said J R Machchi, Sheikh's Sanskrit teacher.

        "Muslim boys and girls diversifying into other educational fields is a good sign," added J S Bandukwala, a retired Physics professor from M S University who runs Zidni Ilma Trust, which promotes professional and technical education among poor Muslim students.




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        Harpreet
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