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Gandhian A nna arms I ndia to fi ght corrup tion: The Story of I ndia’s ant i-graft ca mpaign

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  • Salil RK
    Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption: The Story of India’s anti-graft campaignThe Story of India’s anti-graft campaign | Washington
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 4, 2012
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      Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption: The Story of India’s anti-graft campaign

      The Story of India’s anti-graft campaign | Washington Post
      http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/indian-journal-seeking-balance-india/2012/jan/1/gandhian-anna-arms-india-fight-corruption-story-in/#.TwGo5N1uZlU.twitter





      NEW DELHI, January 1, 2012 - As 2011 bids adieu, the important events for the year are pictures of popular unrest around the world from Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street.
      India recently experienced a significant anti-graft campaign, which some called, “India’s second struggle for Independence."
      “Anna” Hazare, a 74 year old frail Gandhian with an iron will to fight corruption led the popular anti-corruption.  He brought the mighty state on its knees with his 12 day Hunger strike in New Delhi in August. Kisan Baburao Hazare – popularly known as “Anna” or “elder brother” in the language of his native state of Maharashtra – changed the nature of political discourse in the country. His movement drew its moral authority from its lack of political affiliation and it came at a time when the nation’s conscience was hit by a scam culture. Speaking briefly to the media about himself after the launch of his fast at Rajghat, Hazare said: “I have nothing, except to get a plate of food and a bed to sleep.  I do not have a bank account”.
      His campaign garnered the support of millions of Indians, all across the country. Thousands of people gathered on the streets, chanting slogans “I am Anna” and “We want a corruption free India”. His following largely includes India’s youth and the growing middle class, which passionately identified itself with Hazare’s cause. Indian youth, often referred as “children of liberalization”, played an important role in the protests.  They demonstrated to the nation that it is not merely a generation obsessed with social networking on their Smartphone’s but also one capable of getting street smart when it comes to asserting their rights. For the first time, corruption in public life became an issue at home and everyone decided to do something about it.
      What is the root cause of this malady that plagues the country?
      Corruption goes back to the flawed economic policies of the past that created an all-pervasive “permit raj,” where a citizen required a license to start a business, expand a business, import, or even invest. The average citizen was dependent on the government bureaucrats not only for licenses for his business, but for all other services for which the state was the only supplier, such as obtaining land record files, getting a driving license, a birth certificate for your child or a telephone connection.
      High-level Bureaucrats quickly discovered that licenses could be bartered for favors, while politicians saw in the system an opportunity to seek funding for their electoral campaigns. With the growing greed to seek more and more, values departed from political life and governance became amoral.
      With time, this corruption percolated down the entire bureaucracy from senior bureaucrats and politicians to lower-level government employees who would not do what they were supposed to do unless bribed.
      Economists claim that such “rent-creating” corruption is quite expensive for the economy and decelerates growth. Some, like Kaushik Basu, have made such radical suggestions as to make bribes legal in India to at least create a structure where victims would have recourse if the bribe does not bring the promised result. 
      The Anna team came out with a draft of a strong Lokpal Bill with the country’s Central Bureau of Investigation under it to investigate all cases of corruption at various levels of governance.
      Unnerved by the growing support for Hazare’s protest, the government finally succumbed and agreed to an anti-corruption law.  However, in a recent U-turn, the lower house of Parliament passed a Lokpal Bill, a toothless bill which has no investigative powers or any inquiry wing of its own. It can merely refer cases to the CBI (Central Bureau of Investigation), an agency that works under political influence of the ruling party.  
      Anna Hazare and his team, unhappy with the government’s version of the bill, started fresh protests in Mumbai, however the Gandhian had to call off the fast this time as his deteriorating health did not allow him to continue the Hunger strike.
      Amidst this continued tussle between the government and the civil society activists, the Parliament has become a political theatre where it seems the interests of all parties converge when they agree to disagree and keep the bill hanging between the two houses for various amendments. None of them seem committed to creating a strong and independent Ombudsman that would be a panacea for corruption. All those trying to block an effective anti-corruption bill show that it is  true that power corrupts; however the prospect of loosing power corrupts absolutely.
      As a noted journalist Mr. M.J Akbar said “Anna Hazare and his youth are not demanding the fall of a Pharaoh; or an abolition of parliamentary democracy. They insist on a cure for a cancer eating at the body politic. Parliament is in question only because it has not been able to pass a Lokpal bill in 43 years, or indeed been able to debar criminals from contesting elections for ever. When a quarter of MPs have a criminal record, indifference is the preferred strategy of the establishment. The streets are screaming against this indifference”
      While the fate of the bill still remains a mystery, 2011 will salute the Gandhian for bringing the issue of corruption to the national center stage, and giving voice to the millions of anonymous Indians seething with anger against corruption that made money the sole presiding deity of life. Under his leadership, the campaign showed the Indian ruling class that arrogance of power has to be replaced by performance and that if political corruption can make a democracy dysfunctional people will gather to legislate from the streets to wake them up from the deep slumber.

       

      Regards

       

      Salil Rameshchandra

       

    • rajagopalan ss
      It is ridiculous to call Anna Hazare a Gandhian. At best, he may be called a social-activist. ssr To: citizen-mumbai@googlegroups.com;
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 4, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        It is ridiculous to call Anna Hazare a Gandhian. At best, he may be called a social-activist.
        ssr


        To: citizen-mumbai@...; arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com
        From: protekmumbai@...
        Date: Wed, 4 Jan 2012 23:37:21 +0530
        Subject: [Arkitect India] Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption: The Story of India’s anti-graft campaign

         

        Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption: The Story of India’s anti-graft campaign

        The Story of India’s anti-graft campaign | Washington Post
        http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/indian-journal-seeking-balance-india/2012/jan/1/gandhian-anna-arms-india-fight-corruption-story-in/#.TwGo5N1uZlU.twitter





        NEW DELHI, January 1, 2012 - As 2011 bids adieu, the important events for the year are pictures of popular unrest around the world from Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street.
        India recently experienced a significant anti-graft campaign, which some called, “India’s second struggle for Independence."
        “Anna” Hazare, a 74 year old frail Gandhian with an iron will to fight corruption led the popular anti-corruption.  He brought the mighty state on its knees with his 12 day Hunger strike in New Delhi in August. Kisan Baburao Hazare – popularly known as “Anna” or “elder brother” in the language of his native state of Maharashtra – changed the nature of political discourse in the country. His movement drew its moral authority from its lack of political affiliation and it came at a time when the nation’s conscience was hit by a scam culture. Speaking briefly to the media about himself after the launch of his fast at Rajghat, Hazare said: “I have nothing, except to get a plate of food and a bed to sleep.  I do not have a bank account”.
        His campaign garnered the support of millions of Indians, all across the country. Thousands of people gathered on the streets, chanting slogans “I am Anna” and “We want a corruption free India”. His following largely includes India’s youth and the growing middle class, which passionately identified itself with Hazare’s cause. Indian youth, often referred as “children of liberalization”, played an important role in the protests.  They demonstrated to the nation that it is not merely a generation obsessed with social networking on their Smartphone’s but also one capable of getting street smart when it comes to asserting their rights. For the first time, corruption in public life became an issue at home and everyone decided to do something about it.
        What is the root cause of this malady that plagues the country?
        Corruption goes back to the flawed economic policies of the past that created an all-pervasive “permit raj,” where a citizen required a license to start a business, expand a business, import, or even invest. The average citizen was dependent on the government bureaucrats not only for licenses for his business, but for all other services for which the state was the only supplier, such as obtaining land record files, getting a driving license, a birth certificate for your child or a telephone connection.
        High-level Bureaucrats quickly discovered that licenses could be bartered for favors, while politicians saw in the system an opportunity to seek funding for their electoral campaigns. With the growing greed to seek more and more, values departed from political life and governance became amoral.
        With time, this corruption percolated down the entire bureaucracy from senior bureaucrats and politicians to lower-level government employees who would not do what they were supposed to do unless bribed.
        Economists claim that such “rent-creating” corruption is quite expensive for the economy and decelerates growth. Some, like Kaushik Basu, have made such radical suggestions as to make bribes legal in India to at least create a structure where victims would have recourse if the bribe does not bring the promised result. 
        The Anna team came out with a draft of a strong Lokpal Bill with the country’s Central Bureau of Investigation under it to investigate all cases of corruption at various levels of governance.
        Unnerved by the growing support for Hazare’s protest, the government finally succumbed and agreed to an anti-corruption law.  However, in a recent U-turn, the lower house of Parliament passed a Lokpal Bill, a toothless bill which has no investigative powers or any inquiry wing of its own. It can merely refer cases to the CBI (Central Bureau of Investigation), an agency that works under political influence of the ruling party.  
        Anna Hazare and his team, unhappy with the government’s version of the bill, started fresh protests in Mumbai, however the Gandhian had to call off the fast this time as his deteriorating health did not allow him to continue the Hunger strike.
        Amidst this continued tussle between the government and the civil society activists, the Parliament has become a political theatre where it seems the interests of all parties converge when they agree to disagree and keep the bill hanging between the two houses for various amendments. None of them seem committed to creating a strong and independent Ombudsman that would be a panacea for corruption. All those trying to block an effective anti-corruption bill show that it is  true that power corrupts; however the prospect of loosing power corrupts absolutely.
        As a noted journalist Mr. M.J Akbar said “Anna Hazare and his youth are not demanding the fall of a Pharaoh; or an abolition of parliamentary democracy. They insist on a cure for a cancer eating at the body politic. Parliament is in question only because it has not been able to pass a Lokpal bill in 43 years, or indeed been able to debar criminals from contesting elections for ever. When a quarter of MPs have a criminal record, indifference is the preferred strategy of the establishment. The streets are screaming against this indifference”
        While the fate of the bill still remains a mystery, 2011 will salute the Gandhian for bringing the issue of corruption to the national center stage, and giving voice to the millions of anonymous Indians seething with anger against corruption that made money the sole presiding deity of life. Under his leadership, the campaign showed the Indian ruling class that arrogance of power has to be replaced by performance and that if political corruption can make a democracy dysfunctional people will gather to legislate from the streets to wake them up from the deep slumber.

         

        Regards

         

        Salil Rameshchandra

         


      • Sukla Sen
        Anna Hazare, an ex-army truck driver, regardless of all his other merits and demerits, is a fake Gandian. One who prescribes flogging in public for those who
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 5, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Anna Hazare, an ex-army truck driver, regardless of all his other
          merits and demerits, is a fake Gandian.
          One who prescribes flogging in public for those who drink is
          definitely no Gandhian.

          Sukla

          On 04/01/2012, Salil RK <protekmumbai@...> wrote:
          >
          > Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption: The Story of India’s
          > anti-graft campaignThe Story of India’s anti-graft campaign | Washington
          > Posthttp://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/indian-journal-seeking-balance-india/2012/jan/1/gandhian-anna-arms-india-fight-corruption-story-in/#.TwGo5N1uZlU.twitter
          >
          >
          > NEW DELHI, January 1, 2012 - As 2011 bids adieu, the
          > important events for the year are pictures of popular unrest around the
          > world from Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street.India recently experienced a
          > significant anti-graft campaign, which some called, “India’s second struggle
          > for Independence."“Anna”
          > Hazare, a 74 year old frail Gandhian with an iron will to fight
          > corruption led the popular anti-corruption. He brought the mighty state
          > on its knees with his 12 day Hunger strike in New Delhi in August.
          > Kisan Baburao Hazare – popularly known as “Anna” or “elder brother” in
          > the language of his native state of Maharashtra – changed the nature of
          > political discourse in the country. His movement drew its moral
          > authority from its lack of political affiliation and it came at a time
          > when the nation’s conscience was hit by a scam culture. Speaking briefly
          > to the media about himself after the launch of his fast at Rajghat,
          > Hazare said: “I have nothing, except to get a plate of food and a bed to
          > sleep. I do not have a bank account”.His campaign garnered the
          > support of millions of Indians, all across the country. Thousands of
          > people gathered on the streets, chanting slogans “I am Anna” and “We
          > want a corruption free India”. His following largely includes India’s
          > youth and the growing middle class, which passionately identified itself
          > with Hazare’s cause. Indian youth, often referred as “children of
          > liberalization”, played an important role in the protests. They
          > demonstrated to the nation that it is not merely a generation obsessed
          > with social networking on their Smartphone’s but also one capable of
          > getting street smart when it comes to asserting their rights. For the
          > first time, corruption in public life became an issue at home and
          > everyone decided to do something about it.What is the root cause of this
          > malady that plagues the country?Corruption
          > goes back to the flawed economic policies of the past that created an
          > all-pervasive “permit raj,” where a citizen required a license to start a
          > business, expand a business, import, or even invest. The average
          > citizen was dependent on the government bureaucrats not only for
          > licenses for his business, but for all other services for which the
          > state was the only supplier, such as obtaining land record files,
          > getting a driving license, a birth certificate for your child or a
          > telephone connection.High-level Bureaucrats quickly discovered
          > that licenses could be bartered for favors, while politicians saw in the
          > system an opportunity to seek funding for their electoral campaigns.
          > With the growing greed to seek more and more, values departed from
          > political life and governance became amoral.With time, this
          > corruption percolated down the entire bureaucracy from senior
          > bureaucrats and politicians to lower-level government employees who
          > would not do what they were supposed to do unless bribed.Economists
          > claim that such “rent-creating” corruption is quite expensive for the
          > economy and decelerates growth. Some, like Kaushik Basu, have made such
          > radical suggestions as to make bribes legal in India to at least create a
          > structure where victims would have recourse if the bribe does not bring
          > the promised result. The Anna team came out with a draft of a
          > strong Lokpal Bill with the country’s Central Bureau of Investigation
          > under it to investigate all cases of corruption at various levels of
          > governance.Unnerved by the growing support for Hazare’s protest,
          > the government finally succumbed and agreed to an anti-corruption law.
          > However, in a recent U-turn, the lower house of Parliament passed a
          > Lokpal Bill, a toothless bill which has no investigative powers or any
          > inquiry wing of its own. It can merely refer cases to the CBI (Central
          > Bureau of Investigation), an agency that works under political influence
          > of the ruling party. Anna Hazare and his team, unhappy with the
          > government’s version of the bill, started fresh protests in Mumbai,
          > however the Gandhian had to call off the fast this time as his
          > deteriorating health did not allow him to continue the Hunger strike.Amidst
          > this continued tussle between the government and the civil society
          > activists, the Parliament has become a political theatre where it seems
          > the interests of all parties converge when they agree to disagree and
          > keep the bill hanging between the two houses for various amendments.
          > None of them seem committed to creating a strong and independent
          > Ombudsman that would be a panacea for corruption. All those trying to
          > block an effective anti-corruption bill show that it is true that power
          > corrupts; however the prospect of loosing power corrupts absolutely.As
          > a noted journalist Mr. M.J Akbar said “Anna Hazare and his youth are
          > not demanding the fall of a Pharaoh; or an abolition of parliamentary
          > democracy. They insist on a cure for a cancer eating at the body
          > politic. Parliament is in question only because it has not been able to
          > pass a Lokpal bill in 43 years, or indeed been able to debar criminals
          > from contesting elections for ever. When a quarter of MPs have a
          > criminal record, indifference is the preferred strategy of the
          > establishment. The streets are screaming against this indifference”While
          > the fate of the bill still remains a mystery, 2011 will salute the
          > Gandhian for bringing the issue of corruption to the national center
          > stage, and giving voice to the millions of anonymous Indians seething
          > with anger against corruption that made money the sole presiding deity
          > of life. Under his leadership, the campaign showed the Indian ruling
          > class that arrogance of power has to be replaced by performance and that
          > if political corruption can make a democracy dysfunctional people will
          > gather to legislate from the streets to wake them up from the deep
          > slumber.
          >
          >
          > Regards
          >
          > Salil Rameshchandra
          >
          >
          > --
          > You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
          > "Citizen-Mumbai" group.
          > To post to this group, send email to citizen-mumbai@....
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
          > citizen-mumbai+unsubscribe@....
          > For more options, visit this group at
          > http://groups.google.com/group/citizen-mumbai?hl=en.
          >
          >


          --
          Peace Is Doable
        • Ujjwal K Chowdhury
          I am not personally aware of the person who has written this comment, Mr Rajagopalan. And I am a simple academic, not a Gandhian in the sense of practising it.
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 5, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            I am not personally aware of the person who has written this comment, Mr Rajagopalan. And I am a simple academic, not a Gandhian in the sense of practising it. However, I have seen the work in Ralegaon Siddhi and my students had made a film on it. And nation is seeing Anna movement, despite its occasional setbacks. If he is not a Gandhian, then Gandhian way of life is perhaps dead. And to tell 'ridiculous' is arrogance and ignorance combined. Sad that a voice which has galvanized the nation against corruption is being targeted by a few supposedly well meaning people as well, apart from the Digvijay Singhs of the world who already are known elements.

            On Thu, Jan 5, 2012 at 12:22 PM, rajagopalan ss <ssrajagopalan@...> wrote:
             

            It is ridiculous to call Anna Hazare a Gandhian. At best, he may be called a social-activist.
            ssr


            To: citizen-mumbai@...; arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com
            From: protekmumbai@...
            Date: Wed, 4 Jan 2012 23:37:21 +0530
            Subject: [Arkitect India] Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption: The Story of India’s anti-graft campaign


             

            Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption: The Story of India’s anti-graft campaign

            The Story of India’s anti-graft campaign | Washington Post
            http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/indian-journal-seeking-balance-india/2012/jan/1/gandhian-anna-arms-india-fight-corruption-story-in/#.TwGo5N1uZlU.twitter





            NEW DELHI, January 1, 2012 - As 2011 bids adieu, the important events for the year are pictures of popular unrest around the world from Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street.
            India recently experienced a significant anti-graft campaign, which some called, “India’s second struggle for Independence."
            “Anna” Hazare, a 74 year old frail Gandhian with an iron will to fight corruption led the popular anti-corruption.  He brought the mighty state on its knees with his 12 day Hunger strike in New Delhi in August. Kisan Baburao Hazare – popularly known as “Anna” or “elder brother” in the language of his native state of Maharashtra – changed the nature of political discourse in the country. His movement drew its moral authority from its lack of political affiliation and it came at a time when the nation’s conscience was hit by a scam culture. Speaking briefly to the media about himself after the launch of his fast at Rajghat, Hazare said: “I have nothing, except to get a plate of food and a bed to sleep.  I do not have a bank account”.
            His campaign garnered the support of millions of Indians, all across the country. Thousands of people gathered on the streets, chanting slogans “I am Anna” and “We want a corruption free India”. His following largely includes India’s youth and the growing middle class, which passionately identified itself with Hazare’s cause. Indian youth, often referred as “children of liberalization”, played an important role in the protests.  They demonstrated to the nation that it is not merely a generation obsessed with social networking on their Smartphone’s but also one capable of getting street smart when it comes to asserting their rights. For the first time, corruption in public life became an issue at home and everyone decided to do something about it.
            What is the root cause of this malady that plagues the country?
            Corruption goes back to the flawed economic policies of the past that created an all-pervasive “permit raj,” where a citizen required a license to start a business, expand a business, import, or even invest. The average citizen was dependent on the government bureaucrats not only for licenses for his business, but for all other services for which the state was the only supplier, such as obtaining land record files, getting a driving license, a birth certificate for your child or a telephone connection.
            High-level Bureaucrats quickly discovered that licenses could be bartered for favors, while politicians saw in the system an opportunity to seek funding for their electoral campaigns. With the growing greed to seek more and more, values departed from political life and governance became amoral.
            With time, this corruption percolated down the entire bureaucracy from senior bureaucrats and politicians to lower-level government employees who would not do what they were supposed to do unless bribed.
            Economists claim that such “rent-creating” corruption is quite expensive for the economy and decelerates growth. Some, like Kaushik Basu, have made such radical suggestions as to make bribes legal in India to at least create a structure where victims would have recourse if the bribe does not bring the promised result. 
            The Anna team came out with a draft of a strong Lokpal Bill with the country’s Central Bureau of Investigation under it to investigate all cases of corruption at various levels of governance.
            Unnerved by the growing support for Hazare’s protest, the government finally succumbed and agreed to an anti-corruption law.  However, in a recent U-turn, the lower house of Parliament passed a Lokpal Bill, a toothless bill which has no investigative powers or any inquiry wing of its own. It can merely refer cases to the CBI (Central Bureau of Investigation), an agency that works under political influence of the ruling party.  
            Anna Hazare and his team, unhappy with the government’s version of the bill, started fresh protests in Mumbai, however the Gandhian had to call off the fast this time as his deteriorating health did not allow him to continue the Hunger strike.
            Amidst this continued tussle between the government and the civil society activists, the Parliament has become a political theatre where it seems the interests of all parties converge when they agree to disagree and keep the bill hanging between the two houses for various amendments. None of them seem committed to creating a strong and independent Ombudsman that would be a panacea for corruption. All those trying to block an effective anti-corruption bill show that it is  true that power corrupts; however the prospect of loosing power corrupts absolutely.
            As a noted journalist Mr. M.J Akbar said “Anna Hazare and his youth are not demanding the fall of a Pharaoh; or an abolition of parliamentary democracy. They insist on a cure for a cancer eating at the body politic. Parliament is in question only because it has not been able to pass a Lokpal bill in 43 years, or indeed been able to debar criminals from contesting elections for ever. When a quarter of MPs have a criminal record, indifference is the preferred strategy of the establishment. The streets are screaming against this indifference”
            While the fate of the bill still remains a mystery, 2011 will salute the Gandhian for bringing the issue of corruption to the national center stage, and giving voice to the millions of anonymous Indians seething with anger against corruption that made money the sole presiding deity of life. Under his leadership, the campaign showed the Indian ruling class that arrogance of power has to be replaced by performance and that if political corruption can make a democracy dysfunctional people will gather to legislate from the streets to wake them up from the deep slumber.

             

            Regards

             

            Salil Rameshchandra

             





            --
            Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
            Dean, Whistling Woods School of Media & Communication, Mumbai
            Managing Editor, New Global Indian, www.newglobalindian.com; www.icmlive.com
            Handsets: 00-91-93733-11239; 00-91-77091-53239.
            Former Executive Director, International School of Business & Media (Communication)
            Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
            Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.


          • Sukla Sen
            For a different view on Anna Hazare s work in Ralegan Siddhi, look up: . Sukla ... -- Peace Is Doable
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 7, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              For a different view on Anna Hazare's work in Ralegan Siddhi, look up:
              <kafila.org/2011/04/12/the-making-of-anna-hazare/>.

              Sukla

              On 06/01/2012, Ujjwal K Chowdhury <ujjwalk.chowdhury@...> wrote:
              > I am not personally aware of the person who has written this comment, Mr
              > Rajagopalan. And I am a simple academic, not a Gandhian in the sense of
              > practising it. However, I have seen the work in Ralegaon Siddhi and my
              > students had made a film on it. And nation is seeing Anna movement, despite
              > its occasional setbacks. If he is not a Gandhian, then Gandhian way of life
              > is perhaps dead. And to tell 'ridiculous' is arrogance and ignorance
              > combined. Sad that a voice which has galvanized the nation against
              > corruption is being targeted by a few supposedly well meaning people as
              > well, apart from the Digvijay Singhs of the world who already are known
              > elements.
              >
              > On Thu, Jan 5, 2012 at 12:22 PM, rajagopalan ss
              > <ssrajagopalan@...>wrote:
              >
              >> **
              >>
              >>
              >> It is ridiculous to call Anna Hazare a Gandhian. At best, he may be
              >> called a social-activist.
              >> ssr
              >>
              >> ------------------------------
              >> To: citizen-mumbai@...; arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com
              >> From: protekmumbai@...
              >> Date: Wed, 4 Jan 2012 23:37:21 +0530
              >> Subject: [Arkitect India] Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption:
              >> The Story of India’s anti-graft campaign
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption: The Story of India’s
              >> anti-graft campaignThe Story of India’s anti-graft campaign | Washington
              >> Post*
              >> http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/indian-journal-seeking-balance-india/2012/jan/1/gandhian-anna-arms-india-fight-corruption-story-in/#.TwGo5N1uZlU.twitter
              >> *
              >> *
              >> *
              >> *
              >> *
              >> *NEW DELHI*, January 1, 2012 - As 2011 bids adieu, the important events
              >> for the year are pictures of popular unrest around the world from Arab
              >> Spring to Occupy Wall Street.
              >> India recently experienced a significant anti-graft campaign, which some
              >> called, “India’s second struggle for Independence."
              >> “Anna” Hazare, a 74 year old frail Gandhian with an iron will to fight
              >> corruption led the popular anti-corruption. He brought the mighty state
              >> on
              >> its knees with his 12 day Hunger strike in New Delhi in August. Kisan
              >> Baburao Hazare – popularly known as “Anna” or “elder brother” in the
              >> language of his native state of Maharashtra – changed the nature of
              >> political discourse in the country. His movement drew its moral authority
              >> from its lack of political affiliation and it came at a time when the
              >> nation’s conscience was hit by a scam culture. Speaking briefly to the
              >> media about himself after the launch of his fast at Rajghat, Hazare said:
              >> “I have nothing, except to get a plate of food and a bed to sleep. I do
              >> not have a bank account”.
              >> His campaign garnered the support of millions of Indians, all across the
              >> country. Thousands of people gathered on the streets, chanting slogans “I
              >> am Anna” and “We want a corruption free India”. His following largely
              >> includes India’s youth and the growing middle class, which passionately
              >> identified itself with Hazare’s cause. Indian youth, often referred as
              >> “children of liberalization”, played an important role in the protests.
              >> They demonstrated to the nation that it is not merely a generation
              >> obsessed
              >> with social networking on their Smartphone’s but also one capable of
              >> getting street smart when it comes to asserting their rights. For the
              >> first
              >> time, corruption in public life became an issue at home and everyone
              >> decided to do something about it.
              >> What is the root cause of this malady that plagues the country?
              >> Corruption goes back to the flawed economic policies of the past that
              >> created an all-pervasive “permit raj,” where a citizen required a license
              >> to start a business, expand a business, import, or even invest. The
              >> average
              >> citizen was dependent on the government bureaucrats not only for licenses
              >> for his business, but for all other services for which the state was the
              >> only supplier, such as obtaining land record files, getting a driving
              >> license, a birth certificate for your child or a telephone connection.
              >> High-level Bureaucrats quickly discovered that licenses could be bartered
              >> for favors, while politicians saw in the system an opportunity to seek
              >> funding for their electoral campaigns. With the growing greed to seek more
              >> and more, values departed from political life and governance became
              >> amoral.
              >> With time, this corruption percolated down the entire bureaucracy from
              >> senior bureaucrats and politicians to lower-level government employees who
              >> would not do what they were supposed to do unless bribed.
              >> Economists claim that such “rent-creating” corruption is quite expensive
              >> for the economy and decelerates growth. Some, like Kaushik Basu, have made
              >> such radical suggestions as to make bribes legal in India to at least
              >> create a structure where victims would have recourse if the bribe does not
              >> bring the promised result.
              >> The Anna team came out with a draft of a strong Lokpal Bill with the
              >> country’s Central Bureau of Investigation under it to investigate all
              >> cases
              >> of corruption at various levels of governance.
              >> Unnerved by the growing support for Hazare’s protest, the government
              >> finally succumbed and agreed to an anti-corruption law. However, in a
              >> recent U-turn, the lower house of Parliament passed a Lokpal Bill, a
              >> toothless bill which has no investigative powers or any inquiry wing of
              >> its
              >> own. It can merely refer cases to the CBI (Central Bureau of
              >> Investigation), an agency that works under political influence of the
              >> ruling party.
              >> Anna Hazare and his team, unhappy with the government’s version of the
              >> bill, started fresh protests in Mumbai, however the Gandhian had to call
              >> off the fast this time as his deteriorating health did not allow him to
              >> continue the Hunger strike.
              >> Amidst this continued tussle between the government and the civil society
              >> activists, the Parliament has become a political theatre where it seems
              >> the
              >> interests of all parties converge when they agree to disagree and keep the
              >> bill hanging between the two houses for various amendments. None of them
              >> seem committed to creating a strong and independent Ombudsman that would
              >> be
              >> a panacea for corruption. All those trying to block an effective
              >> anti-corruption bill show that it is true that power corrupts; however
              >> the
              >> prospect of loosing power corrupts absolutely.
              >> *As a noted journalist Mr. M.J Akbar said “Anna Hazare and his youth are
              >> not demanding the fall of a Pharaoh; or an abolition of parliamentary
              >> democracy. They insist on a cure for a cancer eating at the body politic.
              >> Parliament is in question only because it has not been able to pass a
              >> Lokpal bill in 43 years, or indeed been able to debar criminals from
              >> contesting elections for ever. When a quarter of MPs have a criminal
              >> record, indifference is the preferred strategy of the establishment. The
              >> streets are screaming against this indifference”*
              >> While the fate of the bill still remains a mystery, 2011 will salute the
              >> Gandhian for bringing the issue of corruption to the national center
              >> stage,
              >> and giving voice to the millions of anonymous Indians seething with anger
              >> against corruption that made money the sole presiding deity of life. Under
              >> his leadership, the campaign showed the Indian ruling class that arrogance
              >> of power has to be replaced by performance and that if political
              >> corruption
              >> can make a democracy dysfunctional people will gather to legislate from
              >> the
              >> streets to wake them up from the deep slumber.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Regards
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Salil Rameshchandra
              >>
              >> **
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              > --
              > Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
              > Dean, Whistling Woods School of Media & Communication, Mumbai
              > Managing Editor, New Global Indian, www.newglobalindian.com; www.icmlive.com
              > Handsets: 00-91-93733-11239; 00-91-77091-53239.
              > Former Executive Director, International School of Business & Media
              > (Communication)
              > Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU,
              > Pune.
              > Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and
              > WHO, India.
              >


              --
              Peace Is Doable
            • Ujjwal K Chowdhury
              Dear Ms Sukla, I have always supported your pro-people and pro-left stand on several issues earlier. Unfortunately, I cannot accept your urbane elitist
              Message 6 of 8 , Jan 8, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Dear Ms Sukla, I have always supported your pro-people and pro-left stand on several issues earlier.
                Unfortunately, I cannot accept your urbane elitist 'liberal' thought here without knowing ground reality of this.

                The 'flogging' for alcoholism in Ralegaon Siddhi is NOT Anna's solution for all forms, types, places and people of drinking.

                When the villages in that area were plagued by rabid alcoholism and children and women being beaten by drunk men, who abused their meagre earning for deshi bad quality daaru and wasting their health as well in the process, and women approached Anna for solution, he proposed Social Boycott of such persons, which cured much of the ailment. However, with a section of the die-hard alcoholics, this did not work. And, then the Panchayat suggested, including some of the Alcoholics themselves, to have flogging as a means of getting rid of the problem. And, some of the cured alcoholics, including those who were flogged, today hail this 'unique strategy' to get rid of their habit.

                The facts noted above are shot by my students in a film they shot WITHOUT ANNA in the village ten years ago when I was the Media School director of Symbiosis in 2001.

                Sitting in urbane set-up, with IMFL liquor and a regulated drinking habits not affecting family life majorly, this may not even be understood by you and me, UNLESS we see it. And, if not, we do NOT have the right to pass judgments, without changing our families or couple more, on someone who have actually reformed dozens of villages for which you need to SEE that for yourself, which some of my rich-kid urbane Symbi students had done actually, while making the film!

                Still, I respect your pro-people, pro-left stance in most issues, including communalism, workers' rights, human rights, et al.

                Regards
                UKC
                Editor, New Global Indian
                Dean, Whistling Woods International (Communication)



                On Fri, Jan 6, 2012 at 10:02 AM, Sukla Sen <sukla.sen@...> wrote:
                Anna Hazare, an ex-army truck driver, regardless of all his other
                merits and demerits, is a fake Gandian.
                One who prescribes flogging in public for those who drink is
                definitely no Gandhian.

                Sukla

                On 04/01/2012, Salil RK <protekmumbai@...> wrote:
                >
                > Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption:  The Story of India’s
                > anti-graft campaignThe Story of India’s anti-graft campaign | Washington
                > Posthttp://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/indian-journal-seeking-balance-india/2012/jan/1/gandhian-anna-arms-india-fight-corruption-story-in/#.TwGo5N1uZlU.twitter
                >
                >
                > NEW DELHI, January 1, 2012 - As 2011 bids adieu, the
                >  important events for the year are pictures of popular unrest around the
                >  world from Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street.India recently experienced a
                > significant anti-graft campaign, which some called, “India’s second struggle
                > for Independence."“Anna”
                >  Hazare, a 74 year old frail Gandhian with an iron will to fight
                > corruption led the popular anti-corruption.  He brought the mighty state
                >  on its knees with his 12 day Hunger strike in New Delhi in August.
                > Kisan Baburao Hazare – popularly known as “Anna” or “elder brother” in
                > the language of his native state of Maharashtra – changed the nature of
                > political discourse in the country. His movement drew its moral
                > authority from its lack of political affiliation and it came at a time
                > when the nation’s conscience was hit by a scam culture. Speaking briefly
                >  to the media about himself after the launch of his fast at Rajghat,
                > Hazare said: “I have nothing, except to get a plate of food and a bed to
                >  sleep.  I do not have a bank account”.His campaign garnered the
                > support of millions of Indians, all across the country. Thousands of
                > people gathered on the streets, chanting slogans “I am Anna” and “We
                > want a corruption free India”. His following largely includes India’s
                > youth and the growing middle class, which passionately identified itself
                >  with Hazare’s cause. Indian youth, often referred as “children of
                > liberalization”, played an important role in the protests.  They
                > demonstrated to the nation that it is not merely a generation obsessed
                > with social networking on their Smartphone’s but also one capable of
                > getting street smart when it comes to asserting their rights. For the
                > first time, corruption in public life became an issue at home and
                > everyone decided to do something about it.What is the root cause of this
                > malady that plagues the country?Corruption
                >  goes back to the flawed economic policies of the past that created an
                > all-pervasive “permit raj,” where a citizen required a license to start a
                >  business, expand a business, import, or even invest. The average
                > citizen was dependent on the government bureaucrats not only for
                > licenses for his business, but for all other services for which the
                > state was the only supplier, such as obtaining land record files,
                > getting a driving license, a birth certificate for your child or a
                > telephone connection.High-level Bureaucrats quickly discovered
                > that licenses could be bartered for favors, while politicians saw in the
                >  system an opportunity to seek funding for their electoral campaigns.
                > With the growing greed to seek more and more, values departed from
                > political life and governance became amoral.With time, this
                > corruption percolated down the entire bureaucracy from senior
                > bureaucrats and politicians to lower-level government employees who
                > would not do what they were supposed to do unless bribed.Economists
                >  claim that such “rent-creating” corruption is quite expensive for the
                > economy and decelerates growth. Some, like Kaushik Basu, have made such
                > radical suggestions as to make bribes legal in India to at least create a
                >  structure where victims would have recourse if the bribe does not bring
                >  the promised result. The Anna team came out with a draft of a
                > strong Lokpal Bill with the country’s Central Bureau of Investigation
                > under it to investigate all cases of corruption at various levels of
                > governance.Unnerved by the growing support for Hazare’s protest,
                > the government finally succumbed and agreed to an anti-corruption law.
                > However, in a recent U-turn, the lower house of Parliament passed a
                > Lokpal Bill, a toothless bill which has no investigative powers or any
                > inquiry wing of its own. It can merely refer cases to the CBI (Central
                > Bureau of Investigation), an agency that works under political influence
                >  of the ruling party.  Anna Hazare and his team, unhappy with the
                >  government’s version of the bill, started fresh protests in Mumbai,
                > however the Gandhian had to call off the fast this time as his
                > deteriorating health did not allow him to continue the Hunger strike.Amidst
                >  this continued tussle between the government and the civil society
                > activists, the Parliament has become a political theatre where it seems
                > the interests of all parties converge when they agree to disagree and
                > keep the bill hanging between the two houses for various amendments.
                > None of them seem committed to creating a strong and independent
                > Ombudsman that would be a panacea for corruption. All those trying to
                > block an effective anti-corruption bill show that it is  true that power
                >  corrupts; however the prospect of loosing power corrupts absolutely.As
                >  a noted journalist Mr. M.J Akbar said “Anna Hazare and his youth are
                > not demanding the fall of a Pharaoh; or an abolition of parliamentary
                > democracy. They insist on a cure for a cancer eating at the body
                > politic. Parliament is in question only because it has not been able to
                > pass a Lokpal bill in 43 years, or indeed been able to debar criminals
                > from contesting elections for ever. When a quarter of MPs have a
                > criminal record, indifference is the preferred strategy of the
                > establishment. The streets are screaming against this indifference”While
                >  the fate of the bill still remains a mystery, 2011 will salute the
                > Gandhian for bringing the issue of corruption to the national center
                > stage, and giving voice to the millions of anonymous Indians seething
                > with anger against corruption that made money the sole presiding deity
                > of life. Under his leadership, the campaign showed the Indian ruling
                > class that arrogance of power has to be replaced by performance and that
                >  if political corruption can make a democracy dysfunctional people will
                > gather to legislate from the streets to wake them up from the deep
                > slumber.
                >
                >
                > Regards
                >
                > Salil Rameshchandra
                >
                >
                > --
                > You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
                > "Citizen-Mumbai" group.
                > To post to this group, send email to citizen-mumbai@....
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
                > citizen-mumbai+unsubscribe@....
                > For more options, visit this group at
                > http://groups.google.com/group/citizen-mumbai?hl=en.
                >
                >


                --
                Peace Is Doable


                ------------------------------------

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                --
                Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
                Dean, Whistling Woods School of Media & Communication, Mumbai
                Managing Editor, New Global Indian, www.newglobalindian.com; www.icmlive.com
                Handsets: 00-91-93733-11239; 00-91-77091-53239.
                Former Executive Director, International School of Business & Media (Communication)
                Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.


              • V.B.Chandrasekaran Balasubramaniam
                Dear  UKC Editor, New Global Indian Dean, Whistling Woods International (Communication)  Can you kindly send the film, please.I fully agree with your
                Message 7 of 8 , Jan 8, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  Dear  UKC
                  Editor, New Global Indian
                  Dean, Whistling Woods International (Communication) 

                  Can you kindly send the film, please.
                  I fully agree with your response.. After all, though we may not agree with death sentence we all agree with the law, police and punishments. Flogging because it is old may sound cruel but it is not different now. When State can punish, why not the communities?

                  V.B.Chandrasekaran,
                  Peoples' Peace and Prosperity Mission,
                  Chatti Post, Chinthur Mandalam, Khammam District.
                  Mobile: 09490109328
                  Email: verivaan2049@... antarbharatid2010@... 

                  --- On Sun, 1/8/12, Ujjwal K Chowdhury <ujjwalk.chowdhury@...> wrote:

                  From: Ujjwal K Chowdhury <ujjwalk.chowdhury@...>
                  Subject: Re: [Arkitect India] Re: [Citizen-Mumbai] Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption: The Story of India’s anti-graft campaign
                  To: arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com, "Arjya Patnaik" <arjya.p@...>, kiranbedioffice@..., "Manisha IAC" <faithfilms.mumbai@...>
                  Cc: "Salil RK" <protekmumbai@...>, citizen-mumbai@...
                  Date: Sunday, January 8, 2012, 7:07 PM

                   

                  Dear Ms Sukla, I have always supported your pro-people and pro-left stand on several issues earlier.
                  Unfortunately, I cannot accept your urbane elitist 'liberal' thought here without knowing ground reality of this.

                  The 'flogging' for alcoholism in Ralegaon Siddhi is NOT Anna's solution for all forms, types, places and people of drinking.

                  When the villages in that area were plagued by rabid alcoholism and children and women being beaten by drunk men, who abused their meagre earning for deshi bad quality daaru and wasting their health as well in the process, and women approached Anna for solution, he proposed Social Boycott of such persons, which cured much of the ailment. However, with a section of the die-hard alcoholics, this did not work. And, then the Panchayat suggested, including some of the Alcoholics themselves, to have flogging as a means of getting rid of the problem. And, some of the cured alcoholics, including those who were flogged, today hail this 'unique strategy' to get rid of their habit.

                  The facts noted above are shot by my students in a film they shot WITHOUT ANNA in the village ten years ago when I was the Media School director of Symbiosis in 2001.

                  Sitting in urbane set-up, with IMFL liquor and a regulated drinking habits not affecting family life majorly, this may not even be understood by you and me, UNLESS we see it. And, if not, we do NOT have the right to pass judgments, without changing our families or couple more, on someone who have actually reformed dozens of villages for which you need to SEE that for yourself, which some of my rich-kid urbane Symbi students had done actually, while making the film!

                  Still, I respect your pro-people, pro-left stance in most issues, including communalism, workers' rights, human rights, et al.

                  Regards
                  UKC
                  Editor, New Global Indian
                  Dean, Whistling Woods International (Communication)



                  On Fri, Jan 6, 2012 at 10:02 AM, Sukla Sen <sukla.sen@...> wrote:
                  Anna Hazare, an ex-army truck driver, regardless of all his other
                  merits and demerits, is a fake Gandian.
                  One who prescribes flogging in public for those who drink is
                  definitely no Gandhian.

                  Sukla

                  On 04/01/2012, Salil RK <protekmumbai@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption:  The Story of India’s
                  > anti-graft campaignThe Story of India’s anti-graft campaign | Washington
                  > Posthttp://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/indian-journal-seeking-balance-india/2012/jan/1/gandhian-anna-arms-india-fight-corruption-story-in/#.TwGo5N1uZlU.twitter
                  >
                  >
                  > NEW DELHI, January 1, 2012 - As 2011 bids adieu, the
                  >  important events for the year are pictures of popular unrest around the
                  >  world from Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street.India recently experienced a
                  > significant anti-graft campaign, which some called, “India’s second struggle
                  > for Independence."“Anna”
                  >  Hazare, a 74 year old frail Gandhian with an iron will to fight
                  > corruption led the popular anti-corruption.  He brought the mighty state
                  >  on its knees with his 12 day Hunger strike in New Delhi in August.
                  > Kisan Baburao Hazare – popularly known as “Anna” or “elder brother” in
                  > the language of his native state of Maharashtra – changed the nature of
                  > political discourse in the country. His movement drew its moral
                  > authority from its lack of political affiliation and it came at a time
                  > when the nation’s conscience was hit by a scam culture. Speaking briefly
                  >  to the media about himself after the launch of his fast at Rajghat,
                  > Hazare said: “I have nothing, except to get a plate of food and a bed to
                  >  sleep.  I do not have a bank account”.His campaign garnered the
                  > support of millions of Indians, all across the country. Thousands of
                  > people gathered on the streets, chanting slogans “I am Anna” and “We
                  > want a corruption free India”. His following largely includes India’s
                  > youth and the growing middle class, which passionately identified itself
                  >  with Hazare’s cause. Indian youth, often referred as “children of
                  > liberalization”, played an important role in the protests.  They
                  > demonstrated to the nation that it is not merely a generation obsessed
                  > with social networking on their Smartphone’s but also one capable of
                  > getting street smart when it comes to asserting their rights. For the
                  > first time, corruption in public life became an issue at home and
                  > everyone decided to do something about it.What is the root cause of this
                  > malady that plagues the country?Corruption
                  >  goes back to the flawed economic policies of the past that created an
                  > all-pervasive “permit raj,” where a citizen required a license to start a
                  >  business, expand a business, import, or even invest. The average
                  > citizen was dependent on the government bureaucrats not only for
                  > licenses for his business, but for all other services for which the
                  > state was the only supplier, such as obtaining land record files,
                  > getting a driving license, a birth certificate for your child or a
                  > telephone connection.High-level Bureaucrats quickly discovered
                  > that licenses could be bartered for favors, while politicians saw in the
                  >  system an opportunity to seek funding for their electoral campaigns.
                  > With the growing greed to seek more and more, values departed from
                  > political life and governance became amoral.With time, this
                  > corruption percolated down the entire bureaucracy from senior
                  > bureaucrats and politicians to lower-level government employees who
                  > would not do what they were supposed to do unless bribed.Economists
                  >  claim that such “rent-creating” corruption is quite expensive for the
                  > economy and decelerates growth. Some, like Kaushik Basu, have made such
                  > radical suggestions as to make bribes legal in India to at least create a
                  >  structure where victims would have recourse if the bribe does not bring
                  >  the promised result. The Anna team came out with a draft of a
                  > strong Lokpal Bill with the country’s Central Bureau of Investigation
                  > under it to investigate all cases of corruption at various levels of
                  > governance.Unnerved by the growing support for Hazare’s protest,
                  > the government finally succumbed and agreed to an anti-corruption law.
                  > However, in a recent U-turn, the lower house of Parliament passed a
                  > Lokpal Bill, a toothless bill which has no investigative powers or any
                  > inquiry wing of its own. It can merely refer cases to the CBI (Central
                  > Bureau of Investigation), an agency that works under political influence
                  >  of the ruling party.  Anna Hazare and his team, unhappy with the
                  >  government’s version of the bill, started fresh protests in Mumbai,
                  > however the Gandhian had to call off the fast this time as his
                  > deteriorating health did not allow him to continue the Hunger strike.Amidst
                  >  this continued tussle between the government and the civil society
                  > activists, the Parliament has become a political theatre where it seems
                  > the interests of all parties converge when they agree to disagree and
                  > keep the bill hanging between the two houses for various amendments.
                  > None of them seem committed to creating a strong and independent
                  > Ombudsman that would be a panacea for corruption. All those trying to
                  > block an effective anti-corruption bill show that it is  true that power
                  >  corrupts; however the prospect of loosing power corrupts absolutely.As
                  >  a noted journalist Mr. M.J Akbar said “Anna Hazare and his youth are
                  > not demanding the fall of a Pharaoh; or an abolition of parliamentary
                  > democracy. They insist on a cure for a cancer eating at the body
                  > politic. Parliament is in question only because it has not been able to
                  > pass a Lokpal bill in 43 years, or indeed been able to debar criminals
                  > from contesting elections for ever. When a quarter of MPs have a
                  > criminal record, indifference is the preferred strategy of the
                  > establishment. The streets are screaming against this indifference”While
                  >  the fate of the bill still remains a mystery, 2011 will salute the
                  > Gandhian for bringing the issue of corruption to the national center
                  > stage, and giving voice to the millions of anonymous Indians seething
                  > with anger against corruption that made money the sole presiding deity
                  > of life. Under his leadership, the campaign showed the Indian ruling
                  > class that arrogance of power has to be replaced by performance and that
                  >  if political corruption can make a democracy dysfunctional people will
                  > gather to legislate from the streets to wake them up from the deep
                  > slumber.
                  >
                  >
                  > Regards
                  >
                  > Salil Rameshchandra
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
                  > "Citizen-Mumbai" group.
                  > To post to this group, send email to citizen-mumbai@....
                  > To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
                  > citizen-mumbai+unsubscribe@....
                  > For more options, visit this group at
                  > http://groups.google.com/group/citizen-mumbai?hl=en.
                  >
                  >


                  --
                  Peace Is Doable


                  ------------------------------------

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                  --
                  Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
                  Dean, Whistling Woods School of Media & Communication, Mumbai
                  Managing Editor, New Global Indian, www.newglobalindian.com; www.icmlive.com
                  Handsets: 00-91-93733-11239; 00-91-77091-53239.
                  Former Executive Director, International School of Business & Media (Communication)
                  Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                  Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.


                • Paadam Pm
                  Dear All, I didn’t want to get into online discussion on the issue. However, I am now tempted to comment. Kindly bear me out as I am resonably well informed
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jan 8, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Dear All,

                    I didn’t want to get into online discussion on the issue. However, I am now tempted to comment. Kindly bear me out as I am resonably well informed person on the subject of alcoholism and alcohol abuse and trying to do something in this regard. And working with the Court and Govts to bring about a National and State Level Alcohol Harm Control Policy. But people like us are keeping low because of the extreme grip of Alcohol mafia in the Govt, (a nexus of liquor business, officials and politicians) and the Govts' fixation on liquor revenue. And because of the perception that any engagement with the Govt now will not succeed, with almost no backing of civil society and people at large. Moreover, we don’t have yet an environment rooted on Good Governance, with almost all stakeholders with vested interests. We have enough Dealers masquerading as Leaders. We have businessmen in power and not statesmen. So, it becomes almost impossible to engage constructively in this issue as on today. And the support of civil society is also suspect.

                    Now, coming to the topic of flogging / not flogging to 'REFORM' a 'DRUNKARD', unfortunately there is so much of ignorance across the spectrum of society, from Judges to Professors to Politicians to Gandhians to Religious Heads to Youth to Juveniles. Publci health activists and experts are not doing enough to inform the people.  All said and done, Indian society today is far far away from scientific grounding and temper. When Ignorance is the rule rather than exception, there is very little light to lead.

                    Violent methods like flogging as a remedy or resort to alcohol abuse is not restricted to the likes of Anna's panchayat. Hundreds of unrecognised, crude and cruel de-addiction centres across India do the same thing on a much larger scale, because of the near absence of Legal, Government run Residential De-addiction & Rehab centres. This is not only restricted to Deaddiction and treatment of Alcoholics, but generally for Mental Health programs as a whole.

                    We know, even for health, whether primary, secondary or tertiary care, successive Indian Govt's record is so poor , poorer than most of the third world countries. When India needs a full loaf of bread as public investment in healthcare, what is provided is a slice of bread. And when it comes to Mental healthcare, what is provided is just crumbs of bread.

                    So, millions of Indians who are mentally ill continue to suffer without treatment or at the hands of quacks who peddle variety of remedies, "from spurious concoctions to flogging & chaining" as treatment. There are so many alcoholic patients who have died of shock treatment, who have ended up with broken limbs or those simply committed suicide unable to stand the treatment at 'so-called' De-addiction /rehab centres in our great nation. Our Ministries of Health, Social Justice and even Courts are very insensitive in this regard.

                    Now, let us understand the issue in right perspective. Alcoholism is a disease (rather disorder), say similar to Diabetes. You don’t flog diabetic patients to REFORM them.  There are no 'drunkards' in society, but only 'alcoholics'. Drunkard  as a noun should be removed from our vocabulary. 

                    You don’t call a Chain smoker who is addicted as a Smokard, Nor do you call a those who are addicted to compulsive eating of sweets as a Sweetard. Same with coffee addiction or drug addiction. All these are addictions. An alcoholic needs help of health professionals consisting of Psychiatrists, Psychologists and of course other specialists to treat secondary causes due to drinking such as Malnutrition, Liver ailments, etc, in some cases TB, even HIV AIDS contracted due to alcohol abuse. Drinking is not a crime, but an addiction, of course it leads to several social and health consequences. Similarly, Abuse leads to so many  social and violent consequences such as wife beating, drunken driving, violent sex etc as it removes the inhibition in men.

                    But, what makes alcohol different from other addictive substances is explained below.

                    'WHO' calls 'Alcohol as NO ORDINARY COMMODITY' due to its three important mechanisms which have the ability to cause medical, psychological and social harm.

                    (1) physical toxicity (2) intoxication and (3) dependence.

                    The Physical Toxicity of Alcohol has a number of direct and indirect effects on a wide range of body organs and systems, from Head to Toe. More than 66 types of ailments have been documented due to its toxicity.

                    The intoxication of alcohol in alcohol abuse situations leads to Alcohol-related  harm in the general population. The link between intoxication and adverse consequences is clear and strong, especially for a number of physical violent acts in households and outside including rape, suicide, murder, traffic casualties and other injuries.

                    The Dependence on Alcohol otherwise called Addiction has many types of contributory causes including genetic vulnerability. But, Addiction is caused due to habitual drinking including high dosage. This reinforces the first two risks apart from causing heavy financial burden on individuals, families and society at large.

                    There is no basis to say that IFML is superior to country liquor. All are equally bad. There are enough alcoholics in lower strata of society as well as middle and upper strata too. But, the problem of people in villages or in slums in towns suffering on account of alcoholism and abuse is much more visible and amplified, because more than 80% of Indians belong to lower strata and majority of Indians are poor labourers from deprived societies without education or social status and naturally much more vulnerable than others. So, the problem is seen as minimal, moderate or acute depending on the population of each segment of society and the social strata of the person who views the issue and comments on it.  

                    So, please understand that even in urban life there are unregulated drinking issues which harm families and health. Similarly, in rural and poor setting too, there are people with regulated drinking habits.

                    Scientific evidence confirms that addiction is predisposed due to certain genetic factoring. So, when 10 people take to alcohol, at least 4 of them may become addicts as they are genetically more susceptible to the glucose based chemicals. But scientists are yet to isolate the gene responsible for causing addiction. When someone drinks, dopamine is released which gives the pleasure and lot of endorphin is secreted which leads to craving. The person who gets addicted has no control over the craving. Hence he needs external assistance, but certainly not in the form of flogging after tying to a tree.

                    So, Dear Friends, please remove the moral hangover on calling Alcoholics as drunkards. If someone needs flogging, it is the dirty likes of Vijay Mallya who have no moral qualms or ethics in brainwashing the youth, bleeding families, exploiting & disrobing women, putting up a facade of fashion, sports, fast cars etc for his endless greed,  the Politicians who run liquor factories, whether IFML in towns or country liquor dens in villages and the Govts' policy of mulching people by peddling liquor to generate more revenue . Let us flog them all till they bleed. But, I can’t because flogging only adds to the suffering.

                    I am an ardent follower of Gandhi on many issues. But, he was wrong on the moral preaching on alcoholism even though his intentions were good. It is because of his grounding in Church during his British days. But, in hindsight, I do understand that he had no scientific rooting on the issue of alcohol except that it was a social evil which affects the poor and so-called low castes. 

                    The other point one should understand is that much dirty water has flowed in the rivers of Ganga,Yamuna and Kaveri and much pollution has happened since the 1940/50s and the issues with regard to tackling alcohol as a Social /Health/Economic issue today is dramatically so different from the Gandhian era.

                    But, the Country is not yet ready or prepared to comprehend the impact of alcohol on the well being, on the human resource development and human development in this subcontinent. So, families, individuals, youth continue to pay a heavy price to one of the most powerful enemies of mankind, the liquor. Moreover, the problem of liquor as a major issue today is  the legacy of the British rule. What was a minimal cultural indulgence by the working class and farmers before the British came to India was made was amplified into  mammoth proportions by the British who brought in their Rum and version of chemical spirits and converted it into money spinning merchandise. Of course this is what the Europeans did since the days of Christopher Columbus throughout the World, in Europe, in west Indies, in Africa and later in Asia.   So, before the advent of British, drinking of alcohol was an incidental  problem of merriment and festivals. But, after the British came, it became a major social and health hazard. Now, it is a crisis.

                    But, one need not condone people who deliberately indulge in outwardly anti-social thing under the influence of liquor. Such as those who drink and drive, they need very stiff punishment as deterrance. Wife beating under the influence of liquor is a social issue and which is partly caused due to the addiction and due to the attempt to shift the problem of his addiction on his wife by imagining and suspecting her fidility. This is a mental issue.


                    But, drunken driving is a deliberate act indulged by unscrupulous rascals both urban, rich drivers on BMWs and the poor drivers of trucks and youth rascals on bikes. They very well know that their and other lives are at risk when they drive under influence of liquor and still they do it. They need very stiff and swift punishment and huge penalty. Ideally, they should not be allowed to drink if thy come in their vehicles or drive afte a party or pub or a bar.


                    This is where our legal system and Governance as a whole fails unlike countries like Japan, Korea and most of West where robust framework is in place. Drunken driving still happens there but as an exception. In India, it is a rule.

                    So, almost 40 minutes of my time is gone in trying to put things in a brief scientific and historical perspective for some of you to understand. Hope , my time is not wasted. Trying to reply to unsolicited emails such as these are also becoming an addiction, so to say.


                    Narayanan.A

                    --
                    To read all the issues of paadam, Pl visit our web www.paadam.in &
                     blog  www.paadam-pm.blogspot.com and leave your comments.
                     
                    Regards
                    A.Narayanan (98403 93581)
                    Editor
                    Paadam, Monthly Magazine in Tamil for Development Politics
                    2/628, Rapid Nagar,
                    Gerugambakkam
                    Chennai - 602 101.


                    On Mon, Jan 9, 2012 at 12:37 AM, Ujjwal K Chowdhury <ujjwalk.chowdhury@...> wrote:
                     

                    Dear Ms Sukla, I have always supported your pro-people and pro-left stand on several issues earlier.
                    Unfortunately, I cannot accept your urbane elitist 'liberal' thought here without knowing ground reality of this.

                    The 'flogging' for alcoholism in Ralegaon Siddhi is NOT Anna's solution for all forms, types, places and people of drinking.

                    When the villages in that area were plagued by rabid alcoholism and children and women being beaten by drunk men, who abused their meagre earning for deshi bad quality daaru and wasting their health as well in the process, and women approached Anna for solution, he proposed Social Boycott of such persons, which cured much of the ailment. However, with a section of the die-hard alcoholics, this did not work. And, then the Panchayat suggested, including some of the Alcoholics themselves, to have flogging as a means of getting rid of the problem. And, some of the cured alcoholics, including those who were flogged, today hail this 'unique strategy' to get rid of their habit.

                    The facts noted above are shot by my students in a film they shot WITHOUT ANNA in the village ten years ago when I was the Media School director of Symbiosis in 2001.

                    Sitting in urbane set-up, with IMFL liquor and a regulated drinking habits not affecting family life majorly, this may not even be understood by you and me, UNLESS we see it. And, if not, we do NOT have the right to pass judgments, without changing our families or couple more, on someone who have actually reformed dozens of villages for which you need to SEE that for yourself, which some of my rich-kid urbane Symbi students had done actually, while making the film!

                    Still, I respect your pro-people, pro-left stance in most issues, including communalism, workers' rights, human rights, et al.

                    Regards
                    UKC
                    Editor, New Global Indian
                    Dean, Whistling Woods International (Communication)



                    On Fri, Jan 6, 2012 at 10:02 AM, Sukla Sen <sukla.sen@...> wrote:
                    Anna Hazare, an ex-army truck driver, regardless of all his other
                    merits and demerits, is a fake Gandian.
                    One who prescribes flogging in public for those who drink is
                    definitely no Gandhian.

                    Sukla

                    On 04/01/2012, Salil RK <protekmumbai@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Gandhian Anna arms India to fight corruption:  The Story of India’s
                    > anti-graft campaignThe Story of India’s anti-graft campaign | Washington
                    > Posthttp://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/indian-journal-seeking-balance-india/2012/jan/1/gandhian-anna-arms-india-fight-corruption-story-in/#.TwGo5N1uZlU.twitter
                    >
                    >
                    > NEW DELHI, January 1, 2012 - As 2011 bids adieu, the
                    >  important events for the year are pictures of popular unrest around the
                    >  world from Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street.India recently experienced a
                    > significant anti-graft campaign, which some called, “India’s second struggle
                    > for Independence."“Anna”
                    >  Hazare, a 74 year old frail Gandhian with an iron will to fight
                    > corruption led the popular anti-corruption.  He brought the mighty state
                    >  on its knees with his 12 day Hunger strike in New Delhi in August.
                    > Kisan Baburao Hazare – popularly known as “Anna” or “elder brother” in
                    > the language of his native state of Maharashtra – changed the nature of
                    > political discourse in the country. His movement drew its moral
                    > authority from its lack of political affiliation and it came at a time
                    > when the nation’s conscience was hit by a scam culture. Speaking briefly
                    >  to the media about himself after the launch of his fast at Rajghat,
                    > Hazare said: “I have nothing, except to get a plate of food and a bed to
                    >  sleep.  I do not have a bank account”.His campaign garnered the
                    > support of millions of Indians, all across the country. Thousands of
                    > people gathered on the streets, chanting slogans “I am Anna” and “We
                    > want a corruption free India”. His following largely includes India’s
                    > youth and the growing middle class, which passionately identified itself
                    >  with Hazare’s cause. Indian youth, often referred as “children of
                    > liberalization”, played an important role in the protests.  They
                    > demonstrated to the nation that it is not merely a generation obsessed
                    > with social networking on their Smartphone’s but also one capable of
                    > getting street smart when it comes to asserting their rights. For the
                    > first time, corruption in public life became an issue at home and
                    > everyone decided to do something about it.What is the root cause of this
                    > malady that plagues the country?Corruption
                    >  goes back to the flawed economic policies of the past that created an
                    > all-pervasive “permit raj,” where a citizen required a license to start a
                    >  business, expand a business, import, or even invest. The average
                    > citizen was dependent on the government bureaucrats not only for
                    > licenses for his business, but for all other services for which the
                    > state was the only supplier, such as obtaining land record files,
                    > getting a driving license, a birth certificate for your child or a
                    > telephone connection.High-level Bureaucrats quickly discovered
                    > that licenses could be bartered for favors, while politicians saw in the
                    >  system an opportunity to seek funding for their electoral campaigns.
                    > With the growing greed to seek more and more, values departed from
                    > political life and governance became amoral.With time, this
                    > corruption percolated down the entire bureaucracy from senior
                    > bureaucrats and politicians to lower-level government employees who
                    > would not do what they were supposed to do unless bribed.Economists
                    >  claim that such “rent-creating” corruption is quite expensive for the
                    > economy and decelerates growth. Some, like Kaushik Basu, have made such
                    > radical suggestions as to make bribes legal in India to at least create a
                    >  structure where victims would have recourse if the bribe does not bring
                    >  the promised result. The Anna team came out with a draft of a
                    > strong Lokpal Bill with the country’s Central Bureau of Investigation
                    > under it to investigate all cases of corruption at various levels of
                    > governance.Unnerved by the growing support for Hazare’s protest,
                    > the government finally succumbed and agreed to an anti-corruption law.
                    > However, in a recent U-turn, the lower house of Parliament passed a
                    > Lokpal Bill, a toothless bill which has no investigative powers or any
                    > inquiry wing of its own. It can merely refer cases to the CBI (Central
                    > Bureau of Investigation), an agency that works under political influence
                    >  of the ruling party.  Anna Hazare and his team, unhappy with the
                    >  government’s version of the bill, started fresh protests in Mumbai,
                    > however the Gandhian had to call off the fast this time as his
                    > deteriorating health did not allow him to continue the Hunger strike.Amidst
                    >  this continued tussle between the government and the civil society
                    > activists, the Parliament has become a political theatre where it seems
                    > the interests of all parties converge when they agree to disagree and
                    > keep the bill hanging between the two houses for various amendments.
                    > None of them seem committed to creating a strong and independent
                    > Ombudsman that would be a panacea for corruption. All those trying to
                    > block an effective anti-corruption bill show that it is  true that power
                    >  corrupts; however the prospect of loosing power corrupts absolutely.As
                    >  a noted journalist Mr. M.J Akbar said “Anna Hazare and his youth are
                    > not demanding the fall of a Pharaoh; or an abolition of parliamentary
                    > democracy. They insist on a cure for a cancer eating at the body
                    > politic. Parliament is in question only because it has not been able to
                    > pass a Lokpal bill in 43 years, or indeed been able to debar criminals
                    > from contesting elections for ever. When a quarter of MPs have a
                    > criminal record, indifference is the preferred strategy of the
                    > establishment. The streets are screaming against this indifference”While
                    >  the fate of the bill still remains a mystery, 2011 will salute the
                    > Gandhian for bringing the issue of corruption to the national center
                    > stage, and giving voice to the millions of anonymous Indians seething
                    > with anger against corruption that made money the sole presiding deity
                    > of life. Under his leadership, the campaign showed the Indian ruling
                    > class that arrogance of power has to be replaced by performance and that
                    >  if political corruption can make a democracy dysfunctional people will
                    > gather to legislate from the streets to wake them up from the deep
                    > slumber.
                    >
                    >
                    > Regards
                    >
                    > Salil Rameshchandra
                    >
                    >
                    > --
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                    > To post to this group, send email to citizen-mumbai@....
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                    >


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                    Peace Is Doable


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                    --
                    Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury
                    Dean, Whistling Woods School of Media & Communication, Mumbai
                    Managing Editor, New Global Indian, www.newglobalindian.com; www.icmlive.com
                    Handsets: 00-91-93733-11239; 00-91-77091-53239.
                    Former Executive Director, International School of Business & Media (Communication)
                    Former Director, Symbiosis Institute of Media & Communication & Dean, SIU, Pune.
                    Former Media Adviser, Textiles Ministry, GOI; The Nippon Foundation; and WHO, India.






                     
                     
                     

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