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low-grade rocks

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  • loohon
    Occasionally The Committee will select common stones that one would not expect to find in a high-intensity device. These are stones that do not take very
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 29, 2009
      Occasionally The Committee will select common stones that one would not expect to find in a high-intensity device. These are stones that do not take very concentrated programming, such as common limestone, granite, porous river rocks.

      Also sometimes they will choose the local sandstone around here, which actually can sometimes approach the programmability of quartzite, due to its silica sand content.
      For other programs, quartzite is preferable or equally desirable to clear quartz crystal.

      I presume this has to do with the orgone characteristics of the stones in the context of how they are used.

      This radionics device
      http://loohan.com/birdcage.jpg
      has some driveway rox as well as a few more pricey rox worth around $15 each. Whatever is needed. The funky rox are not an inferior substitute, they are the right rox in the right place.

      Most of the stones i added to the top part of my gold CB
      http://loohan.com/CBgold.tet2.jpg
      are rox i plucked off my driveway. Yet this turned out amazingly intense.

      I think ALL the stones i added when i re-cast my stronti-cake
      http://loohan.com/MobyBrick3.jpg
      are like that. I used a bunch that are covered with dark stuff in this pic as well. Yet this turned out enormously powerful:
      http://loohan.com/MobyBrick5.jpg

      I also have about a gallon of such stones set aside for the 6-pipe CB i'm supposed to build eventually (which is being re-engineered now).

      The major usage of such stones has been for chem-busters. Yet, the unit i recently put together from an old device
      http://loohan.com/CBrefurb2a.jpg
      has NO low-grade rox. Mostly quartzite river rock, which i don't consider really low-grade. Likewise, the "mini-CB" which turned into almost a 4-gallon project
      http://loohan.com/strontiumCBsquare.jpg
      has NO low-grade rox. Mainly crystals and tumbled gemstones.
      Nor does the clearcast pipeless CB to its left. Mostly the quartzite again here.
      Nor were low-grade rox called for in the refurb of sittingtaoist's CB which is ongoing. Quartzite was, but he had to settle for crystals because that's all he can get. Actually the crystals are just as good here.

      Moral: especially if you are making or re-making units for chem-busting purposes, you may be prompted to use some unseemly rocks off the ground.
    • loohon
      Here s an oddity that i don t know whether anyone else will ever be guided to emulate: http://loohan.com/MobyBrick4.jpg This is Moby Brick again, after the rox
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 30, 2009
        Here's an oddity that i don't know whether anyone else will ever be guided to emulate:
        http://loohan.com/MobyBrick4.jpg
        This is Moby Brick again, after the rox on the mobe had been poured over.
        I was guided to make 2 tubes out of hardware cloth, and fill them with low-grade rox. And wrap each with a small simple mobe spiral in the center, and paint with cobalt paint. Note how the tubes are perpendicular to the pipes. I presume these help boost the action of the pipes.
        This is the only time i have done this.

        --- In arcturan_technologies@yahoogroups.com, "loohon" <dogwood57@...> wrote:
        >
        > Occasionally The Committee will select common stones that one would not expect to find in a high-intensity device. These are stones that do not take very concentrated programming, such as common limestone, granite, porous river rocks.
        >
        > Also sometimes they will choose the local sandstone around here, which actually can sometimes approach the programmability of quartzite, due to its silica sand content.
        > For other programs, quartzite is preferable or equally desirable to clear quartz crystal.
        >
        > I presume this has to do with the orgone characteristics of the stones in the context of how they are used.
        >
        > This radionics device
        > http://loohan.com/birdcage.jpg
        > has some driveway rox as well as a few more pricey rox worth around $15 each. Whatever is needed. The funky rox are not an inferior substitute, they are the right rox in the right place.
        >
        > Most of the stones i added to the top part of my gold CB
        > http://loohan.com/CBgold.tet2.jpg
        > are rox i plucked off my driveway. Yet this turned out amazingly intense.
        >
        > I think ALL the stones i added when i re-cast my stronti-cake
        > http://loohan.com/MobyBrick3.jpg
        > are like that. I used a bunch that are covered with dark stuff in this pic as well. Yet this turned out enormously powerful:
        > http://loohan.com/MobyBrick5.jpg
        >
        > I also have about a gallon of such stones set aside for the 6-pipe CB i'm supposed to build eventually (which is being re-engineered now).
        >
        > The major usage of such stones has been for chem-busters. Yet, the unit i recently put together from an old device
        > http://loohan.com/CBrefurb2a.jpg
        > has NO low-grade rox. Mostly quartzite river rock, which i don't consider really low-grade. Likewise, the "mini-CB" which turned into almost a 4-gallon project
        > http://loohan.com/strontiumCBsquare.jpg
        > has NO low-grade rox. Mainly crystals and tumbled gemstones.
        > Nor does the clearcast pipeless CB to its left. Mostly the quartzite again here.
        > Nor were low-grade rox called for in the refurb of sittingtaoist's CB which is ongoing. Quartzite was, but he had to settle for crystals because that's all he can get. Actually the crystals are just as good here.
        >
        > Moral: especially if you are making or re-making units for chem-busting purposes, you may be prompted to use some unseemly rocks off the ground.
        >
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