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Considering Arcology

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  • Randall Hunt
    I ve received a couple requests for a preview of the book I recently published, titled, Considering Arcology . I ve put up a page that includes the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 2, 2000
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      I've received a couple requests for a preview of the book I recently
      published, titled, "Considering Arcology". I've put up a page that includes
      the Introduction and a sampling of graphics. It's available at
      http://www.wildapache.net/randhunt/book.htm

      I appreciate the response I've gotten.

      Randall
    • Laurie Barlow
      From a case study of land use and transit: http://www.designacademy.nl/publictransport/case3.htm#anchor93103 Land-use and public transport in integrated
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 11, 2000
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        From a case study of land use and transit:
        http://www.designacademy.nl/publictransport/case3.htm#anchor93103

        Land-use and public transport in integrated development.

        The use of the structural axes reflect a deep understanding of the
        dynamic relationship of public
        transport and land-use activities. In Curitiba, commercial and
        residential areas with their
        associated municipal services were integrated in high density zones
        along the structural axes, and
        were therefore fully accessible through public transportation. This is
        an excellent example of
        coherent urban development where public transport is one part of an
        integrated whole.


        Public transport as a catalyst for an organized urban growth.

        The Master Plan called for the implementation of the structural axes
        while the city was still
        organically growing in circles around the a city center. This bold
        stroke "grew" the city in
        accordance with an integrated development plan. The success of this
        strategy has resulted in a
        high percentage of public transport ridership even among car owners;
        elimination of the road way
        "gridlock" that has plagued other cities around the world; and the
        preservation of the historic city center.
        -----------------------------------------------------------------

        The point here is, transit, land use and density are an inseparable
        integrated whole, and one cannot be designed without the other. Paolo's
        descriptions of Arcology included "rivers of transport" flowing through
        the structure of the organism. There are many ways of organizing space
        so that transportation moves from one form to another, culminating in
        rapid transit for large numbers of folks, of which the planners and
        transportation engineers are intimately familiar.

        What this group needs, as does Randall, is some kind of an "out of the
        box" charette with leading professionals in the field, because you all
        are just beginning to address the stuff that professionals have been
        dealing with for years. It's just that they're locked into the old
        paradigm...

        The only thing that's different is imposing the criteria of density on a
        pre-designed conceptual framework, as opposed to the normal flat sprawl,
        which is due to the expense of creating 3-D structures of this scale.
        What this changes in the transit equation is the "walkable radius" which
        is now in 3 dimensions instead of two, so that many more folks could
        walk to a mass-transit station instead of driving cars there.

        Think of a plant with a bunch of "pods" on stems. The pods are the
        walkable 3-D radius, the stems are the collector systems, whether bus,
        light rail, whatever, to a main terminal, like good ol' NY Central, that
        uses the train out to the next metropolis.

        After that, the problem is the same as the New York subway.

        Hopefully, the agriculture and the production of goods and the power
        generation and the energy useage will be done internally, so that
        there's not so much transport of goods between the arcology and the rest
        of the world.

        Which means no ordering stuff on e-Bay for shipping in! Truck traffic
        and all that...

        I think the problem is actually population and levels of consumption in
        the US and Europe. If there were fewer people and simpler lifestyles we
        wouldn't be having this discussion.

        Arcology amounts to an "Iron lung solution" to a smallpox
        problem...where's Sabin when you need him?

        What I felt was important about Arcosanti is the sustainability
        practices employed there, not the building designs, except for the fact
        that they made minimal energy consumption possible. The Corbusian
        solution of packing all the bodies into a megastructure with huge green
        lawns all about (the Paris solution) is not feasible when you analyze
        the infrastructure needs associated with the structures, particularly if
        you figure the car parking needed for the number of bodies it contains.

        Do the math.
        --
        Laurie Barlow, AIA http://pw1.netcom.com/~barlowco/BarlowCo.html
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