Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

2008 Arcology Plan in Dubai

Expand Messages
  • Franz Nahrada
    almost 2 years ago, on 14th of February 2008, Louis Dallara wrote (quouting Andrew C. Revkin) ... Did anyone look at the much more daing and ambitious project
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      almost 2 years ago, on 14th of February 2008, Louis Dallara wrote

      (quouting Andrew C. Revkin)
      >
      > I have a story in this
      >week's Science Times on Abu Dhabi's Masdar City — a 2.3-square-mile
      >complex that by 2016 should, if plans hold, house nearly 50,000 people
      >working on next-generation energy technologies. No cars. Solar cells
      >for electricity and solar-thermal arrays for the energy needed for air
      >conditioning. Local agriculture. Waste fully recycled.
      >
      >The community and the research institute at its core are part of a
      >$15-billion advanced-energy initiative rolled out over the past two
      >years by the government of Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab
      >Emirates. There's added cash coming from outside investors under the
      >"clean development mechanism" of the Kyoto Protocol, which allows
      >industrialized countries to get credit toward their greenhouse-gas
      >targets by paying for non-polluting development projects in developing
      >countries (the Emirates included).
      >
      >Sultan Al Jaber, the chief executive officer of the overarching Masdar
      >Initiative, told me that the goal is to use the wealth accrued over a
      >half century of oil extraction to help shift the economy slowly toward
      >exporting renewable or non-polluting energy technology.


      Did anyone look at the much more daing and ambitious project shown here?

      searched it in the archives but did not find it mentioned.


      http://www.timelinks.org/

      http://flashydubai.com/ziggurat-pyramid-dubai-the-most-funkiest-project-ever-envisioned/

      even if it seems that Dubai is in financial troubles, its worth noticing
      that for the first time a project that reflects the ultimate ambition and
      dimension of arcology was conceived with obvious governmental support.

      "Ziggurat was unveiled at Cityscape Dubai (2008?) . It is by far the
      “funkiest” project ever envisioned. Ziggurat is an environmentally
      sustainable futuristic city housed inside a pyramid. The city will employ
      natural renewable energy resources of solar, wind and steam making it
      completely self-sustainable in energetic terms and supported by a carbon
      neutral system producing zero carbon dioxide emissions. The power of
      nature is going to be harnessed to support a million people in this city.
      The project is being undertaken by Dubai based environmental design
      company Timelinks.

      "Ziggurat communities can be almost totally self-sufficient energy-wise.
      Apart from using steam power in the building we will also employ wind
      turbine technology to harness natural energy resources. Whole cities can
      be accommodated in complexes which take up less than 10% of the original
      land surface. Public and private landscaping will be used for leisure
      pursuits or irrigated as agricultural land”, said Timelinks, MD, Ridas
      Matonis.

      A horizontal and vertical integrated 360 degree network will be the mode
      of transportation in this city of the future, making cars redundant.
      Facial recognition technology for security purposes is another interesting
      feature that is going to be incorporated in Ziggurat Project.

      The ginormous pyramid will cover 2.3 square kilometers, will be able to
      sustain a “community” of up to 1 million and will have plenty of green
      spaces for recreation and agriculture."
    • Jeff Buderer
      Franz, What I see often is the issue of scaling as missing in such large scale models. First give me an example of an Auroville or Arcosanti model of
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 4, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Franz,

        What I see often is the issue of scaling as missing in such large scale models.

        First give me an example of an Auroville or Arcosanti model of ecovillage development that is working really well and then we can consider those larger scale models.

        From my trip to Taiwan I realized that the model is really in Asia where they already have high density cities. So We have to be clear what an Arcology or similarly themed project would add to a city like Hong Kong or Taipei that already has a 10000 person per sq mi density.

        We also need to be clear on how such a project would scale.

        For example Arcosanti has a lot of work to do in terms of being an effective model of sustainable living and maybe a lot of our existing practices and strategies need to be rethought out. I say this as a resident of Arcosanti.

        The point is that we need to focus on human scale projects and currently the human scale in the Arcology universe is the 60 plus or minus people who live and work at Arcosanti.

        Once we get things optimized at this scale we can move up to 100, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 5000, 10000, 100000, 500000, 1000000 etc to the point where we decide the limits of urban Arcology growth has been attained.

        For me thinking of 1000000 person Arcology is not relevant right  now and that is why Franz I support your effort to promote more of GLOBAL VILLAGES approach to development. It may at some point but we have to figure out how to build a sustainable habitat at the 60-150 person level before we scale it up to those kinds of numbers.

        Jeff



        On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 at 3:38 PM, Franz Nahrada <f.nahrada@...> wrote:
         

        almost 2 years ago, on 14th of February 2008, Louis Dallara wrote

        (quouting Andrew C. Revkin)
        >
        > I have a story in this
        >week's Science Times on Abu Dhabi's Masdar City — a 2.3-square-mile
        >complex that by 2016 should, if plans hold, house nearly 50,000 people
        >working on next-generation energy technologies. No cars. Solar cells
        >for electricity and solar-thermal arrays for the energy needed for air
        >conditioning. Local agriculture. Waste fully recycled.
        >
        >The community and the research institute at its core are part of a
        >$15-billion advanced-energy initiative rolled out over the past two
        >years by the government of Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab
        >Emirates. There's added cash coming from outside investors under the
        >"clean development mechanism" of the Kyoto Protocol, which allows
        >industrialized countries to get credit toward their greenhouse-gas
        >targets by paying for non-polluting development projects in developing
        >countries (the Emirates included).
        >
        >Sultan Al Jaber, the chief executive officer of the overarching Masdar
        >Initiative, told me that the goal is to use the wealth accrued over a
        >half century of oil extraction to help shift the economy slowly toward
        >exporting renewable or non-polluting energy technology.

        Did anyone look at the much more daing and ambitious project shown here?

        searched it in the archives but did not find it mentioned.

        http://www.timelinks.org/

        http://flashydubai.com/ziggurat-pyramid-dubai-the-most-funkiest-project-ever-envisioned/

        even if it seems that Dubai is in financial troubles, its worth noticing
        that for the first time a project that reflects the ultimate ambition and
        dimension of arcology was conceived with obvious governmental support.

        "Ziggurat was unveiled at Cityscape Dubai (2008?) . It is by far the
        “funkiest” project ever envisioned. Ziggurat is an environmentally
        sustainable futuristic city housed inside a pyramid. The city will employ
        natural renewable energy resources of solar, wind and steam making it
        completely self-sustainable in energetic terms and supported by a carbon
        neutral system producing zero carbon dioxide emissions. The power of
        nature is going to be harnessed to support a million people in this city.
        The project is being undertaken by Dubai based environmental design
        company Timelinks.

        "Ziggurat communities can be almost totally self-sufficient energy-wise.
        Apart from using steam power in the building we will also employ wind
        turbine technology to harness natural energy resources. Whole cities can
        be accommodated in complexes which take up less than 10% of the original
        land surface. Public and private landscaping will be used for leisure
        pursuits or irrigated as agricultural land”, said Timelinks, MD, Ridas
        Matonis.

        A horizontal and vertical integrated 360 degree network will be the mode
        of transportation in this city of the future, making cars redundant.
        Facial recognition technology for security purposes is another interesting
        feature that is going to be incorporated in Ziggurat Project.

        The ginormous pyramid will cover 2.3 square kilometers, will be able to
        sustain a “community” of up to 1 million and will have plenty of green
        spaces for recreation and agriculture."


      • Franz Nahrada
        Jeff B. wrote in the Arcosanti yahoogroup: For me thinking of 1000000 person Arcology is not relevant right now and that is why Franz I support your effort
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 5, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Jeff B. wrote in the Arcosanti yahoogroup:


          "For me thinking of 1000000 person Arcology is not relevant right now and
          that is why Franz I support your effort to promote more of GLOBAL VILLAGES
          approach to development. It may at some point but wehave to figure out how
          to build a sustainable habitat at the 60-150person level before we scale
          it up to those kinds of numbers."

          Thanks Jeff.

          The problem is that Arcology and the Arcology movement is still built on
          those images, which are a far-fledged future dream that we cannot really
          know much about.

          Its the central weakness, but what is now so interesting for me that there
          are less and less enthusiasts that even react to those images. Thats the
          really interesting thing: some people plan an Arcology, a very interestung
          one in Dubai well before the economic crisis - and its almost unnoticed by
          the Arcology movement !! I include Joseph Smyth who worked on both sides,
          villages and Arcology design.

          Thet calls for a critical evaluation of the core ideas of Arcosanti, a
          deep self - reflection in the lights of 30 years practical experience.

          We have recently been able to join forces with Thomas Ermacoras incredible
          network including people like Bjarke Ingels in the Clear Village Lab and a
          lot of architectural ingenuity is discovering Global Villages and
          sustainable community as the next hot thing. The Clear Villages Lab will
          spurr a wave of participatory planning processes through compelling
          joining of forces and effective methods.

          I really would like to see Arcosanti participating in this wave.

          I am particulary interested in a scheme of desert villages I want to
          present to the Desertec Foundation as a viable way to combine electricity
          generation and sustainable habitat building. I am just wondering why there
          is no Solar Concentrator Group yet working in Arcosanti!!

          Franz
        • Jeff Buderer
          Franz, All, Actually the kinds of things we need are what are going to put a facility like Arcosanti on the map as a fully committed org/community/group of
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 7, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Franz, All,

            Actually the kinds of things we need are what are going to put a facility like Arcosanti on the map as a fully committed org/community/group of people dedicated to addressing the core issues that humanity faces.

            The superficial approach would be to say we need to make Arcosanti sustainable (walk the talk/be the change) in relation to say the terms used in the green community such as net zero buildings, climate neutral and other buzzwords indicating a real design change in the way built environments and organizations are run.

            Deeper than that though and what will be needed to actually sustainably drive the above kind of change is a mindset or consciousness shift in which we begin to relate to each other in new and empowering ways, rethinking old assumptions and attitudes about life and the so called human condition.

            Honestly, while I see a great distance between my ideal living space/environment/reality and life at Arcosanti, I am encouraged by the team that is coming together here. Right now at Arcosanti we are involved in an effort to plan out the greenhouse vision that has been referred to as the Energy Apron for the last 30 or more years now. I am now working on a post about this in my blog.

            In the meantime, in relation to my blogging I am catching up on previous news which includes former Workshop Coordinator at Arcosanti becoming involves with the Lost Valley Education Center; an ecovillage in Dexter OR that is focused on permaculture training, sustainable design and building: http://arcosanti.wordpress.com/2009/12/07/camassia_institute/
             
            With regards to the greenhouse effort, we are starting small with a 1000 sq ft hoop greenhouse, but we want to link this modest start with a more ambitious program to build the Energy Apron. A small team is forming and we have had several meetings including at the 90 bday celebration for Paolo and there is one planned for Monday.

            One of the things we have considered for quite some time is the design of the Energy Apron around a Integrated Farming system that includes the cycling of nutrient flows at Arcosanti that include sewage effluent as well as meat and vegi compost. While this is controversial its clear that we cannot as a species continue to flush our valuable nutrients down the toilet or bury them in the landfill.

            While not directly related to Arcosanti or Arcology the Heifer Foundation has done interesting work on what is called Chinese Ecological Agriculture or Integrated Farming: http://www.heifer.org/site/c.edJRKQNiFiG/b.2877337/. This is the kind of model adapted to Arcology/Arcosanti conditions, is what we need in my view to look at and design/develop/prototype at a community scale, before we consider or invest significant time in any larger scale urban Arcology like discussed in the previous thread or in my view like the featured Arcology model at the exhibition that the Cosanti Foundation is participating in in Beijing: http://www.arcosanti.org/today/2009/12/04/1259945218978.html

            Thanks for your interest.

            Jeff Buderer
            Arcosanti

            On Sat, Dec 5, 2009 at 5:34 AM, Franz Nahrada <f.nahrada@...> wrote:
             

            Jeff B. wrote in the Arcosanti yahoogroup:



            "For me thinking of 1000000 person Arcology is not relevant right now and
            that is why Franz I support your effort to promote more of GLOBAL VILLAGES
            approach to development. It may at some point but wehave to figure out how
            to build a sustainable habitat at the 60-150person level before we scale

            it up to those kinds of numbers."

            Thanks Jeff.

            The problem is that Arcology and the Arcology movement is still built on
            those images, which are a far-fledged future dream that we cannot really
            know much about.

            Its the central weakness, but what is now so interesting for me that there
            are less and less enthusiasts that even react to those images. Thats the
            really interesting thing: some people plan an Arcology, a very interestung
            one in Dubai well before the economic crisis - and its almost unnoticed by
            the Arcology movement !! I include Joseph Smyth who worked on both sides,
            villages and Arcology design.

            Thet calls for a critical evaluation of the core ideas of Arcosanti, a
            deep self - reflection in the lights of 30 years practical experience.

            We have recently been able to join forces with Thomas Ermacoras incredible
            network including people like Bjarke Ingels in the Clear Village Lab and a
            lot of architectural ingenuity is discovering Global Villages and
            sustainable community as the next hot thing. The Clear Villages Lab will
            spurr a wave of participatory planning processes through compelling
            joining of forces and effective methods.

            I really would like to see Arcosanti participating in this wave.

            I am particulary interested in a scheme of desert villages I want to
            present to the Desertec Foundation as a viable way to combine electricity
            generation and sustainable habitat building. I am just wondering why there
            is no Solar Concentrator Group yet working in Arcosanti!!

            Franz


          • Jeff Buderer
            Dear All, Just a minor correction/addition, the person I was referring to below is Wes Ozier. Jeff ... Dear All, Just a minor correction/addition, the person I
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 7, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Dear All,

              Just a minor correction/addition, the person I was referring to below is Wes Ozier.

              Jeff
               
              In the meantime, in relation to my blogging I am catching up on previous news which includes former Workshop Coordinator at Arcosanti becoming involves with the Lost Valley Education Center; an ecovillage in Dexter OR that is focused on permaculture training, sustainable design and building: http://arcosanti.wordpress.com/2009/12/07/camassia_institute/

              On Fri, Dec 4, 2009 at 7:15 AM, Jeff Buderer <buderman@...> wrote:
              Franz,

              What I see often is the issue of scaling as missing in such large scale models.

              First give me an example of an Auroville or Arcosanti model of ecovillage development that is working really well and then we can consider those larger scale models.

              From my trip to Taiwan I realized that the model is really in Asia where they already have high density cities. So We have to be clear what an Arcology or similarly themed project would add to a city like Hong Kong or Taipei that already has a 10000 person per sq mi density.

              We also need to be clear on how such a project would scale.

              For example Arcosanti has a lot of work to do in terms of being an effective model of sustainable living and maybe a lot of our existing practices and strategies need to be rethought out. I say this as a resident of Arcosanti.

              The point is that we need to focus on human scale projects and currently the human scale in the Arcology universe is the 60 plus or minus people who live and work at Arcosanti.

              Once we get things optimized at this scale we can move up to 100, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 5000, 10000, 100000, 500000, 1000000 etc to the point where we decide the limits of urban Arcology growth has been attained.

              For me thinking of 1000000 person Arcology is not relevant right  now and that is why Franz I support your effort to promote more of GLOBAL VILLAGES approach to development. It may at some point but we have to figure out how to build a sustainable habitat at the 60-150 person level before we scale it up to those kinds of numbers.

              Jeff




              On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 at 3:38 PM, Franz Nahrada <f.nahrada@...> wrote:
               

              almost 2 years ago, on 14th of February 2008, Louis Dallara wrote

              (quouting Andrew C. Revkin)
              >
              > I have a story in this
              >week's Science Times on Abu Dhabi's Masdar City — a 2.3-square-mile
              >complex that by 2016 should, if plans hold, house nearly 50,000 people
              >working on next-generation energy technologies. No cars. Solar cells
              >for electricity and solar-thermal arrays for the energy needed for air
              >conditioning. Local agriculture. Waste fully recycled.
              >
              >The community and the research institute at its core are part of a
              >$15-billion advanced-energy initiative rolled out over the past two
              >years by the government of Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab
              >Emirates. There's added cash coming from outside investors under the
              >"clean development mechanism" of the Kyoto Protocol, which allows
              >industrialized countries to get credit toward their greenhouse-gas
              >targets by paying for non-polluting development projects in developing
              >countries (the Emirates included).
              >
              >Sultan Al Jaber, the chief executive officer of the overarching Masdar
              >Initiative, told me that the goal is to use the wealth accrued over a
              >half century of oil extraction to help shift the economy slowly toward
              >exporting renewable or non-polluting energy technology.

              Did anyone look at the much more daing and ambitious project shown here?

              searched it in the archives but did not find it mentioned.

              http://www.timelinks.org/

              http://flashydubai.com/ziggurat-pyramid-dubai-the-most-funkiest-project-ever-envisioned/

              even if it seems that Dubai is in financial troubles, its worth noticing
              that for the first time a project that reflects the ultimate ambition and
              dimension of arcology was conceived with obvious governmental support.

              "Ziggurat was unveiled at Cityscape Dubai (2008?) . It is by far the
              “funkiest” project ever envisioned. Ziggurat is an environmentally
              sustainable futuristic city housed inside a pyramid. The city will employ
              natural renewable energy resources of solar, wind and steam making it
              completely self-sustainable in energetic terms and supported by a carbon
              neutral system producing zero carbon dioxide emissions. The power of
              nature is going to be harnessed to support a million people in this city.
              The project is being undertaken by Dubai based environmental design
              company Timelinks.

              "Ziggurat communities can be almost totally self-sufficient energy-wise.
              Apart from using steam power in the building we will also employ wind
              turbine technology to harness natural energy resources. Whole cities can
              be accommodated in complexes which take up less than 10% of the original
              land surface. Public and private landscaping will be used for leisure
              pursuits or irrigated as agricultural land”, said Timelinks, MD, Ridas
              Matonis.

              A horizontal and vertical integrated 360 degree network will be the mode
              of transportation in this city of the future, making cars redundant.
              Facial recognition technology for security purposes is another interesting
              feature that is going to be incorporated in Ziggurat Project.

              The ginormous pyramid will cover 2.3 square kilometers, will be able to
              sustain a “community” of up to 1 million and will have plenty of green
              spaces for recreation and agriculture."



            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.