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Vertical Instinct

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  • Daniel DeLorme
    Whee, I just finished reading trough the 200-some messages posted in the last 6 months. That was quite a ride. Through it all, for some reason I felt inspired.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 6, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Whee, I just finished reading trough the 200-some messages posted in the
      last 6 months. That was quite a ride. Through it all, for some reason I
      felt inspired. Please forgive this rant.
      ---

      This list keep bringing up many good and logical arguments about
      Arcology, but I feel there is a deeper subject that remains untouched.

      I've been living in Tokyo for almost two years now, and I keep being
      amazed by the incongruous beauty of its cityscape. The forest of tall
      buildings (average of 10 stories for as far as the eye can see) can
      create some sublime canyon-like effects for those willing to look a
      little past the concrete. The best example can be found at Roppongi
      Hills, a large complex with luxury shopping, residences and
      entertainment. This place, which fits all the criteria of an arcology,
      was architected in such a way that the main interior avenue is a sort of
      slowly curving canyon, with pedestrian bridges linking the two sides of
      the canyon on the upper levels. Not just that avenue, but all parts of
      Roppongi Hills are built with oblique angles and apertures which give it
      an organic feeling, the sense of a place alive with a thousand nooks and
      crannies to explore.

      Last month I visited the Iya valley, a remote and very craggy region in
      central Shikoku. I travelled on twisty roads barely wide enough for a
      car (let alone two), tettering on the sides of ravines so steep that
      when looking on the other side I would often be staring at a pure WALL
      of forest. That's right, in those necks of the woods, the forest is not
      horizontal but VERTICAL. Or at least on a good 80 degree incline. I'm
      not kidding. I've also seen picturesque farmers' cottages clinging on
      what must have been 50 degree mountain slopes.

      The whole point I'm trying to come to is that all that verticality
      absolutely enchants me. No doubt the raw beauty of nature in the Iya
      valley had something to do with it, but I think the impact was also due
      in no small part to the verticality of the landscape. I grew up in a
      rather flat place, and the upward landscape of Japan strikes a very deep
      chord within me. Like the landscape is fuller, richer, that I'm getting
      "more for my money". It just feels... right. Like I belong here.

      I have a little quirky theory about why I like verticality so much.
      Millions of years ago, our simian ancestors lived in trees. Swinging
      from branch to branch, they lived in trees for so long that they
      developed a very *very* good sense of three-dimensional placement. When
      they started walking on the ground they pushed all that unneeded
      instinct to the back of the brain. But it's still there, just waiting to
      be awakened by a vertical-oriented landscape... or cityscape.

      There are a lot of good logical arguments for Arcology, but beyond them
      all is the raw instinct-driven appeal of verticality. I long for the day
      when I can walk in an arcology and see teeming urban life both above and
      below me.

      --
      ____________________________________________________________
      Daniel "42" DeLorme /| |¯|/¯¯¯\
      ICQ:11411269, AIM:DanFortyTwo / |_| | ¯| |
      http://dan42.com |___ | / /_
      http://www.animenewsnetwork.com |_||____|
      ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    • Chris ScottHanson
      I m there with you, Daniel. In spirit... Our mature forests here in the northwest are approximately 20 stories tall, by the way. Chris ScottHanson ... I m
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 8, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        I'm there with you, Daniel.  In spirit...

        Our mature forests here in the northwest are approximately 20 stories tall, by the way.

        Chris ScottHanson


        On Jun 6, 2005, at 2:50 PM, Daniel DeLorme wrote:

        Whee, I just finished reading trough the 200-some messages posted in the
        last 6 months. That was quite a ride. Through it all, for some reason I
        felt inspired. Please forgive this rant.
        ---

        This list keep bringing up many good and logical arguments about
        Arcology, but I feel there is a deeper subject that remains untouched.

        I've been living in Tokyo for almost two years now, and I keep being
        amazed by the incongruous beauty of its cityscape. The forest of tall
        buildings (average of 10 stories for as far as the eye can see) can
        create some sublime canyon-like effects for those willing to look a
        little past the concrete. The best example can be found at Roppongi
        Hills, a large complex with luxury shopping, residences and
        entertainment. This place, which fits all the criteria of an arcology,
        was architected in such a way that the main interior avenue is a sort of
        slowly curving canyon, with pedestrian bridges linking the two sides of
        the canyon on the upper levels. Not just that avenue, but all parts of
        Roppongi Hills are built with oblique angles and apertures which give it
        an organic feeling, the sense of a place alive with a thousand nooks and
        crannies to explore.

        Last month I visited the Iya valley, a remote and very craggy region in
        central Shikoku. I travelled on twisty roads barely wide enough for a
        car (let alone two), tettering on the sides of ravines so steep that
        when looking on the other side I would often be staring at a pure WALL
        of forest. That's right, in those necks of the woods, the forest is not
        horizontal but VERTICAL. Or at least on a good 80 degree incline. I'm
        not kidding. I've also seen picturesque farmers' cottages clinging on
        what must have been 50 degree mountain slopes.

        The whole point I'm trying to come to is that all that verticality
        absolutely enchants me. No doubt the raw beauty of nature in the Iya
        valley had something to do with it, but I think the impact was also due
        in no small part to the verticality of the landscape. I grew up in a
        rather flat place, and the upward landscape of Japan strikes a very deep
        chord within me. Like the landscape is fuller, richer, that I'm getting
        "more for my money". It just feels... right. Like I belong here.

        I have a little quirky theory about why I like verticality so much.
        Millions of years ago, our simian ancestors lived in trees. Swinging
        from branch to branch, they lived in trees for so long that they
        developed a very *very* good sense of three-dimensional placement. When
        they started walking on the ground they pushed all that unneeded
        instinct to the back of the brain. But it's still there, just waiting to
        be awakened by a vertical-oriented landscape... or cityscape.

        There are a lot of good logical arguments for Arcology, but beyond them
        all is the raw instinct-driven appeal of verticality. I long for the day
        when I can walk in an arcology and see teeming urban life both above and
        below me.

        --
        ____________________________________________________________
        Daniel "42" DeLorme                             /| |¯|/¯¯¯\
        ICQ:11411269, AIM:DanFortyTwo                  / |_| | ¯| |
        http://dan42.com                               |___  | / /_
        http://www.animenewsnetwork.com                    |_||____|
        ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯


        Site of the month. Arcosanti
        http://www.arcosanti.org/




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