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(Re)Introduction

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  • Robert Matthews
    Since I ve been lurking for so long, I thing a (re)introduction is in order. Name: Robert Matthews Age: 27 Arcosanti: June 1997 Workshop (w/ Randall Hunt as
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 10, 2002
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      Since I've been lurking for so long, I thing a (re)introduction is in order.

      Name: Robert Matthews
      Age: 27
      Arcosanti: June 1997 Workshop (w/ Randall Hunt as Coordinator)

      I have been actively researching and theorizing the proposition of arcology
      since I discovered it in 1994. During this time, my academic inquiry has
      taken me along many rewarding tangents, some applicable to arcology, others
      merely interesting. Among them are:

      green building, ecocities, ecovillages, history of civilization, history of
      urbanism, urban planning, architectural design, sustainability, utopianism,
      post-modern theory, art history, etc...

      The list is actually somewhat longer, but I'm sure you get the idea. I've
      been quietly amassing a library of intellectual resources related to themes
      of arcology, and have been diligently studying them. I have no real work to
      show for all of this yet, but some things are in the works. I have been
      especially inspired by Randall Hunt, who besides his ongoing dedication to
      the arcology concept, is one of the few of us who has both written and
      published a document of his ideas.

      My life is about to take a dramatic turn. Having been long holed-up here in
      Boston for the last nine years, I've learned a lot about how good American
      cities can be. While far from perfect, Boston is nevertheless a rare gem in
      the United States. I will miss it.

      I am moving to Seattle in just two weeks (after a layover at Burning Man -
      my second time at the brilliant celebration of humanity). I will be pursuing
      my Master of Architecture degree at the University of Washington. I will
      likely continue on to obtain my professional degree in Urban Planning or
      perhaps a Ph.D. in Urban Design. At any rate, I am finally ready to give my
      life over completely to the realization of arcology. And I am not messing
      around this time. I sincerely look forward to collaborating with many of you
      in a more substantial way in the near future. While Architecture school will
      be a very busy time for me, as least I'll be busy doing things which are
      applicable to my life goal - and one I know I have in common with most of
      you - of actually building and living in an arcology.

      Well, that should be enough for now. I am eager to know if there are any
      arcologists in the Seattle area (or Pacific NW) on this list, if so, please
      make yourselves known.

      Peace,

      Robert Matthews
      Boston, Massachusetts
      August 2002

      PS: Randall, it's good to be back!


      >From: Daniel DeLorme <daniel@...>
      >Reply-To: arcology@yahoogroups.com
      >To: arcology@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: Re: [arcology] q
      >Date: Fri, 09 Aug 2002 17:10:53 -0400
      >
      >keramfamily@... wrote:
      > >
      > > there are a number of aging cities in the mid-west and the north-east,
      > > where populations have declined as jobs and industries have moved on.
      > > Chances are that there may be a community which, rather than seeing
      > > itself continue to shrink, (with a corresponding loss of services and
      >the
      > > ability to pay for them) inclined to see the potential for both civic
      >and
      > > commercial gain by agreeing to become an, 'Arcology becoming'. Or
      >perhaps
      > > not. Whatcha' think?
      >
      >The problem I see with is that if an area is in decline, there may be a
      >strong reason for it. The decline may be due to changes in demographics,
      >climate, world economy, etc. The kind of changes that are only obvious in
      >retrospect a hundred years later. No matter the invigorating potential of
      >an arcology (which, I must point out, is still unknown at this point), the
      >area may be already "doomed". In such a case, building an arcology in such
      >an area seems a tad suicidal to me.
      >
      >The arcology would have to actually bring something more to the declining
      >city (like a new industry), and not just a new architectural form.
      >
      >Nam�ri�,
      >___________________________________________________________________________
      >Daniel "42" DeLorme /| |�|/���\
      >ICQ:11411269, AIM:DanFortyTwo / |_| | �| |
      >encyclopedist @ http://www.animenewsnetwork.com |___ | / /_
      >webmaster @ http://dan42.com (Jin-Roh, Millennium Actress) |_||____|
      >���������������������������������������������������������������������������




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