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RE: [aprsisce] digixform (correction)

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  • Robert Bruninga
    Here is a corrected version of my comments: Ø Here are mine I digipeat everything up to WIDE3-3 and then only longer paths if I have heard them directly I
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 11, 2014
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      Here is a corrected version of my comments:

       

      Ø  Here are mine I digipeat everything up to WIDE3-3 and then only longer paths if I have heard them directly

       

      I prefer the opposite approach.  Stopping spam at its source is an order of magnitude more effective for everyone else. 

       

      If there are 100 digipeaters that will be spammed when someone sends a 7-7 packet, then just passing it along does nothing to reduce spam.  Yes, the settings below will reduce excessive-hop spam coming in from other areas, but only at this single digi.  Hence a 1% solution to the problem

       

      However, if 7-7 was forced to 7-0, and 6-6 was forced to 6-0 and so forth, then this setting solves the problem (Does not let the packet leave the local area) and eliminates the spam from all the other 99 at once.  And since the digi is stopping and identifying the spam locally, then the source can SEE that he used an incorrect setting and/or can be contacted locally and advised of proper net operation.

       

      Just another way of looking at things.  That is the technique used in the USA under the New-N paradigm.  That is, trap all long-hop paths to a local one digipeat only.

       

      Bob, Wb4APR

       

      From: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com [mailto:aprsisce@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Steve Daniels

      Here are mine I digipeat everything up to WIDE3-3 and then only longer paths if I have heard them directly

       

      <DigiXform>WIDE1-1=WIDE1*</DigiXform>

      <DigiXform>WIDE2-1=WIDE2*</DigiXform>

      <DigiXform>WIDE2-2=WIDE2-1</DigiXform>

      <DigiXform>WIDE3-1=WIDE3*</DigiXform>

      <DigiXform>WIDE3-2=WIDE3-1</DigiXform>

      <DigiXform>WIDE3-3=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>

      <DigiXform>WIDE4-4=WIDE4-3</DigiXform>

      <DigiXform>WIDE5-5=WIDE5-4</DigiXform>

      <DigiXform>WIDE6-6=WIDE6-5</DigiXform>

      <DigiXform>WIDE7-7=WIDE7-6</DigiXform>

       

      Steve

      G6UIM

    • Fred Hillhouse Jr
      Greetings, A full compliment to allow at least one hop for every possibility looks like this. The list makes up a WIDE3 digipeater.
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 11, 2014
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        Greetings,


        A full compliment to allow at least one hop for every possibility looks like this. The list makes up a WIDE3 digipeater.

        <DigiXform>WIDE1-1=WIDE1*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE2-1=WIDE2*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE2-2=WIDE2-1</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE3-1=WIDE3*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE3-2=WIDE3-1</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE3-3=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE4-1=WIDE4*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE4-2=WIDE4*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE4-3=WIDE4*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE4-4=WIDE4*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE5-1=WIDE5*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE5-2=WIDE5*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE5-3=WIDE5*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE5-4=WIDE5*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE5-5=WIDE5*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE6-1=WIDE6*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE6-2=WIDE6*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE6-3=WIDE6*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE6-4=WIDE6*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE6-5=WIDE6*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE6-6=WIDE6*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE7-1=WIDE7*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE7-2=WIDE7*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE7-3=WIDE7*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE7-4=WIDE7*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE7-5=WIDE7*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE7-6=WIDE7*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE7-7=WIDE7*</DigiXform>

        In situations where there is more traffic, a WIDE2 digieater may be desired and so all the WIDE3-N become the following.

        <DigiXform>WIDE3-1=WIDE3*</DigiXform>

        Handling case where n<N (e.g., WIDE1-2 or WIDE3-7) are assumed to be handled in APRSIS32.

        Hopefully I have that right. :)


        Best regards,
        Fred N7FMH

        ________________________________________
        From: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com [mailto:aprsisce@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert Bruninga
        Sent: Friday, April 11, 2014 9:26 AM
        To: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [aprsisce] digixform (correction)


        Here is a corrected version of my comments:

        ➢ Here are mine I digipeat everything up to WIDE3-3 and then only longer paths if I have heard them directly

        I prefer the opposite approach. Stopping spam at its source is an order of magnitude more effective for everyone else.

        If there are 100 digipeaters that will be spammed when someone sends a 7-7 packet, then just passing it along does nothing to reduce spam. Yes, the settings below will reduce excessive-hop spam coming in from other areas, but only at this single digi. Hence a 1% solution to the problem

        However, if 7-7 was forced to 7-0, and 6-6 was forced to 6-0 and so forth, then this setting solves the problem (Does not let the packet leave the local area) and eliminates the spam from all the other 99 at once. And since the digi is stopping and identifying the spam locally, then the source can SEE that he used an incorrect setting and/or can be contacted locally and advised of proper net operation.

        Just another way of looking at things. That is the technique used in the USA under the New-N paradigm. That is, trap all long-hop paths to a local one digipeat only.

        Bob, Wb4APR

        From: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com [mailto:aprsisce@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Steve Daniels
        Here are mine I digipeat everything up to WIDE3-3 and then only longer paths if I have heard them directly

        <DigiXform>WIDE1-1=WIDE1*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE2-1=WIDE2*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE2-2=WIDE2-1</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE3-1=WIDE3*</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE3-2=WIDE3-1</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE3-3=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE4-4=WIDE4-3</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE5-5=WIDE5-4</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE6-6=WIDE6-5</DigiXform>
        <DigiXform>WIDE7-7=WIDE7-6</DigiXform>

        Steve
        G6UIM
      • James Ewen
        On Fri, Apr 11, 2014 at 7:48 AM, Fred Hillhouse Jr ... If you re saying that any packet being seen with the SSID greater than the last digit in the callsign
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 11, 2014
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          On Fri, Apr 11, 2014 at 7:48 AM, Fred Hillhouse Jr
          <fmhillhouse@...> wrote:

          > Handling case where n<N (e.g., WIDE1-2 or WIDE3-7) are assumed to be handled in APRSIS32.
          >
          > Hopefully I have that right. :)

          If you're saying that any packet being seen with the SSID greater than
          the last digit in the callsign will automatically be handled by
          APRSISCE/32 in some manner to "correct" the packet, that's not going
          to happen.

          It's just doing string matching. If the explicit string isn't found,
          then it gets dropped.

          This is a good thing in which non-compliant hop requests get ignored.

          In the Kantronics line, they do a wildcard match on the last numeric
          value in the callsign, which allow people to exploit the traps by
          using non-compliant trailing values in the callsign.

          --
          James
          VE6SRV
        • Fred Hillhouse Jr
          ... handled in APRSIS32. ... last digit in the callsign will automatically be handled by APRSISCE/32 in some manner to correct the packet, that s not going
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 11, 2014
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            >> Handling case where n<N (e.g., WIDE1-2 or WIDE3-7) are assumed to be
            handled in APRSIS32.


            > If you're saying that any packet being seen with the SSID greater than the
            last digit in the callsign will automatically be handled by APRSISCE/32 in
            some manner to "correct" the packet, that's not going to happen.

            > It's just doing string matching. If the explicit string isn't found, then
            it gets dropped.

            Ah yes, I remember that conversation. I just couldn't at the time I was
            typing. Thanks!

            > This is a good thing in which non-compliant hop requests get ignored.

            Yes it is.

            > In the Kantronics line, they do a wildcard match on the last numeric value
            in the callsign, which allow people to exploit the traps by using
            non-compliant trailing values in the callsign.

            I have seen that used. :(

            Best regards,
            Fred N7FMH
          • Lynn W Deffenbaugh (Mr)
            Nope. In the name of extreme flexibility, APRSISCE/32 makes no assumptions about digipeater aliases and decrementing and n
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 11, 2014
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              Nope. In the name of extreme flexibility, APRSISCE/32 makes no
              assumptions about digipeater aliases and decrementing and n<N (from
              WIDEn-N). If you want WIDE1-2 or WIDE3-7 to be ignored, just don't
              specify them as your example shows. In most opinions, they're invalid
              and should be ignored. But if you want to "correct" the misteaks (sic)
              of others, then you'd have to fully specify all possibilities like...

              <DigiXform>WIDE3-4=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
              <DigiXform>WIDE3-5=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
              <DigiXform>WIDE3-6=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
              <DigiXform>WIDE3-7=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>

              Replace WIDE3-2 with whatever you'd like to do to the packet like maybe
              WIDE3* or even WIDE3,BADPTH*... Boy is THAT going to cause some
              consternation... (yes, I believe you can replace a single path component
              with whatever you specify after the =... Come to think about it, I
              wonder if I actually limit the total path components to 8? Something to
              check).

              Or if you are even more paranoid, there is actually no AX.25-based
              constraint -7 being the max. You might want to go whole-hog and add:

              <DigiXform>WIDE3-8=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
              <DigiXform>WIDE3-9=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
              <DigiXform>WIDE3-10=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
              <DigiXform>WIDE3-11=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
              <DigiXform>WIDE3-12=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
              <DigiXform>WIDE3-13=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
              <DigiXform>WIDE3-14=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>
              <DigiXform>WIDE3-15=WIDE3-2</DigiXform>

              But in normal use, just specify the ones that you want your station to
              act on and ignore the others allowing them to die an ignoble death by
              packet decay.

              Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32



              On 4/11/2014 9:48 AM, Fred Hillhouse Jr wrote:
              > Handling case where n<N (e.g., WIDE1-2 or WIDE3-7) are assumed to be handled in APRSIS32.
              >
              > Hopefully I have that right. :)
              >
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