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Configure APRSISCE for ISS

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  • lenkf5elb
    I am setting up my first APRSISCE Instance ever and am configuring it to send email packets to the ISS and eventually have an IGate to send the emails to me or
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 19, 2013
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      I am setting up my first APRSISCE Instance ever and am configuring it to send email packets to the ISS and eventually have an IGate to send the emails to me or others who have sent email thru the ISS.

      I am running win XP and have an AEA PK88 TNC in KISS Mode. I am assuming for the IGate I will need another instance of APRSISCE, TNC and radio.

      I am not all that knowledgeable on APRS and Igates.

      I have been using UISS and AGW to successfully connect to the ISS, but the email is not getting picked up and sent on. For this setup I am not using AGW. The documentation seems to say it is not necessarily needed.

      First let me say that I have never seen as many trace logs as this program has. Nice job Lynn.

      I have tried to follow the documentation to set up the first part. I am getting some error codes and I am not sure what I have set up wrong.

      Here are some traces I captured.

      Trace KF5ELB <-> CQ:

      10:48:37 New Chat Between KF5ELB and CQ on 2013-11-19
      10:50:08> :EMAIL :lenleslie@... Hello from Len, 73 KF5ELB (*2-10:50:08)

      Trace Messages:

      WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:37.702 New Chat(KF5ELB<>CQ) hwnd(001D01DC) Error(6)
      WinMain:2013-11-19T16:50:08.312 To(CQ) Msg(:EMAIL :lenleslie@... Hello from Len, 73 KF5ELB) NoAck
      WinMain:2013-11-19T16:50:08.312 Sending Message For(CQ) by New

      Getting error 6
      Is NEW correct?

      Trace MyCall:

      2013-11-19T22:23:50.750 [Telemetry] KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#329,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
      2013-11-19T22:39:50.750 [Telemetry] KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#330,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
      2013-11-19T22:48:42.125 [TransmitAPRS] KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :@224842h3031.22N/09751.48W-PHG3000APRS-IS for Win32

      Trace Transmit:

      2013-11-19T22:23:50.750 Transmit(INT) KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#329,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
      2013-11-19T22:39:50.750 Transmit(INT) KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#330,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
      2013-11-19T22:48:42.125 Transmit(INT) KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :@224842h3031.22N/09751.48W-PHG3000APRS-IS for Win32

      Trace Port PK88:

      Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:53.765 Opening COM1 Got -1 Error 5
      Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:53.765 Status 0 Error 0 At 228 in c:\compass\code\aprs\aprsisce\cprtns.c
      Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:53.765 Error Opening COM1:0,N,8,1 LastError 0
      Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Opening COM1:0,N,8,1
      Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Opening COM1 with 4 Args
      Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Opening COM1 Got -1 Error 5
      Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Status 0 Error 0 At 228 in c:\compass\code\aprs\aprsisce\cprtns.c
      Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Error Opening COM1:0,N,8,1 LastError 0

      Get error 5 - Is that because it gets an error opening com 1 the first time and then Error 0 means it opened Com 1 successfully?

      Trace Port Packets:

      WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:23.687 Growing PortPackets from 0 to 16 - Increment
      WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:23.687 Initializing PortPackets[0/1] for RfPort:0 - Increment was 0 for pk88
      WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:24.140 Initializing PortPackets[1/2] for RfPort:1111 - Increment was 0 for *Internal*

      Are the RFPort 1111 and *Internal* OK?

      At the top of the map I have PK88 OK and under it is disabled. Should I have something enabled that is turned off. I have Internet access, OSM Fetch, sound, port for PK88 and logging enabled.

      Any help will be appreciated.

      73's Len KF5ELB
    • Lynn W Deffenbaugh (Mr)
      Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32 ... Based on what I see below, by send email packets do you mean that you re sending an
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 19, 2013
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        Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32
        On 11/19/2013 6:19 PM, lenkf5elb wrote:
        > I am setting up my first APRSISCE Instance ever and am configuring it to send email packets to the ISS and eventually have an IGate to send the emails to me or others who have sent email thru the ISS.

        Based on what I see below, by "send email packets" do you mean that
        you're sending an APRS message to the EMAIL address for subsequent
        sending via the Internet by that service?

        > I am running win XP and have an AEA PK88 TNC in KISS Mode. I am assuming for the IGate I will need another instance of APRSISCE, TNC and radio.

        Whether or not you need another instance depends on the full scope of
        what you're trying to do. I have a single IGate (KJ4ERJ-1) that I use
        interactively when I want to do direct local APRS on the RF network.
        Sometimes I switch it over and use it to work the ISS digipeater or just
        monitor the ISS frequency in a SatGate operation if I happen to notice a
        pass.

        > I am not all that knowledgeable on APRS and Igates.

        There's plenty of folks here that can lend a hand, I'm sure.

        > I have been using UISS and AGW to successfully connect to the ISS, but the email is not getting picked up and sent on. For this setup I am not using AGW. The documentation seems to say it is not necessarily needed.

        I'm not familiar with UISS, but you've got words in there (like
        "connect" and "picked up") that imply that you're trying to work the
        packet station on the ISS and not the APRS digipeater. Can you clarify
        what you mean by the above statements?

        > First let me say that I have never seen as many trace logs as this program has. Nice job Lynn.

        Thanks. I really need to go through and eliminate some as they're now
        actually obsolete and non-informative to the point of confusion.

        > I have tried to follow the documentation to set up the first part. I am getting some error codes and I am not sure what I have set up wrong.
        >
        > Here are some traces I captured.
        >
        > Trace KF5ELB <-> CQ:
        >
        > 10:48:37 New Chat Between KF5ELB and CQ on 2013-11-19
        > 10:50:08> :EMAIL :lenleslie@... Hello from Len, 73 KF5ELB (*2-10:50:08)

        Ok, this is a strange one. Did you open a chat to "CQ" and then send
        the text :EMAIL...? If so, that's not really going to get you any where.

        What you probably wanted to do was open a chat to "EMAIL" and put the
        text "lenleslie@flash..." and send it. APRSISCE/32 takes care of
        building the APRS packet in the proper format for sending an APRS message.

        > Trace Messages:
        >
        > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:37.702 New Chat(KF5ELB<>CQ) hwnd(001D01DC) Error(6)
        > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:50:08.312 To(CQ) Msg(:EMAIL :lenleslie@... Hello from Len, 73 KF5ELB) NoAck
        > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:50:08.312 Sending Message For(CQ) by New
        >
        > Getting error 6
        > Is NEW correct?

        I think this is one of those trace logs that are confusing. As long as
        hwnd() is non-zero, the error is actually left over from some other
        operation. And yes, New is correct in the context of this trace.

        > Trace MyCall:
        >
        > 2013-11-19T22:23:50.750 [Telemetry] KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#329,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
        > 2013-11-19T22:39:50.750 [Telemetry] KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#330,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
        > 2013-11-19T22:48:42.125 [TransmitAPRS] KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :@224842h3031.22N/09751.48W-PHG3000APRS-IS for Win32

        This trace will just show you every packet that mentions your base
        callsign and where it was detected. It's there to see if you've seen
        any packets that mention you while possibly not be addressed to you.

        > Trace Transmit:
        >
        > 2013-11-19T22:23:50.750 Transmit(INT) KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#329,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
        > 2013-11-19T22:39:50.750 Transmit(INT) KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#330,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
        > 2013-11-19T22:48:42.125 Transmit(INT) KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :@224842h3031.22N/09751.48W-PHG3000APRS-IS for Win32

        The first two telemetry packets as Internal make sense. I'm not sure
        why the posit packet is only INT, but it depends on a bunch of other flags.

        However, the path term of "B/ARISS" is definitely incorrect. I'd
        recommend that you get familiar with the terrestrial APRS network before
        jumping into the deep end of the pool with the ISS. Set your Configure
        / Beacon / Path to WIDE2-1 and the radio to 144.390 or whatever your
        local APRS frequency is to get used to the program and APRS operations.

        > Trace Port PK88:
        >
        > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:53.765 Opening COM1 Got -1 Error 5
        > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:53.765 Status 0 Error 0 At 228 in c:\compass\code\aprs\aprsisce\cprtns.c
        > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:53.765 Error Opening COM1:0,N,8,1 LastError 0
        > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Opening COM1:0,N,8,1
        > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Opening COM1 with 4 Args
        > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Opening COM1 Got -1 Error 5
        > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Status 0 Error 0 At 228 in c:\compass\code\aprs\aprsisce\cprtns.c
        > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Error Opening COM1:0,N,8,1 LastError 0
        >
        > Get error 5 - Is that because it gets an error opening com 1 the first time and then Error 0 means it opened Com 1 successfully?

        This is where the true errors start. You have your PK88 port configured
        to use COM1, but with a zero baud rate and worse, APRSISCE/32 isn't able
        to open that COM port, possibly because you have some other program
        using it at the same time. First, go to Configure / Ports / PK88 and
        click Device and correct the baud rate. Then open the trace log and
        make sure it is Enabled. It'll tell you lots of stuff.

        Are you able to talk to the PK88 on COM1 from a terminal emulator? Are
        you sure no other program was accessing COM1 when you captured the above
        log?

        > Trace Port Packets:
        >
        > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:23.687 Growing PortPackets from 0 to 16 - Increment
        > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:23.687 Initializing PortPackets[0/1] for RfPort:0 - Increment was 0 for pk88
        > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:24.140 Initializing PortPackets[1/2] for RfPort:1111 - Increment was 0 for *Internal*
        >
        > Are the RFPort 1111 and *Internal* OK?

        Yes, this is all fine.

        > At the top of the map I have PK88 OK and under it is disabled. Should I have something enabled that is turned off. I have Internet access, OSM Fetch, sound, port for PK88 and logging enabled.

        Check out http://aprsisce.wikidot.com/doc:screen-elements and identify
        the screen area that you're seeing "PK88 OK" in . it should be #27. If
        it says "Disabled" below that, it means that you've got position
        beaconing disabled (check Enables / Beaconing Enabled).

        > Any help will be appreciated.

        See where this takes you and please delete any sections you don't think
        we need to go further with in your reply.

        Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32
      • Steve Daniels
        I think he might be trying to use the PMS on the ISS, which frustrates most APRS users. Because it kills off APRS use, due to all the connected packet retries.
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 19, 2013
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          I think he might be trying to use the PMS on the ISS, which frustrates most APRS users. Because it kills off APRS use, due to all the connected packet retries. I have watched more than a few passes tied up with someone trying to get through the menu system let alone actually leave a message. It also frustrates the station attempting a PMS attempt for the same reason, they have to fight APRS users over a big footprint, for reception on the ISS system

          I believe UISS automates some of the menu process.

          In which case APRSISCE/32 is not suitable software.

          However if he wants to message people via the ISS and perhaps igate received packets then my write up on the WIKI works well. (at least nobody yet has come up with a complaint)

           

           

          Steve Daniels

          Amateur Radio Callsign G6UIM

          Torbay Freecycle  Owner

          http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/torbay_freecycle

          APRSISCE/32 Beta tester and WIKI editor http://aprsisce.wikidot.com

           


          From: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com [mailto: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Lynn W Deffenbaugh (Mr)
          Sent: 19 November 2013 23:51
          To: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [aprsisce] Configure APRSISCE for ISS

           

           


          Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32

          On 11/19/2013 6:19 PM, lenkf5elb wrote:
          > I am setting up my first APRSISCE Instance ever and am configuring it to send email packets to the ISS and eventually have an IGate to send the emails to me or others who have sent email thru the ISS.

          Based on what I see below, by "send email packets" do you mean that
          you're sending an APRS message to the EMAIL address for subsequent
          sending via the Internet by that service?

          > I am running win XP and have an AEA PK88 TNC in KISS Mode. I am assuming for the IGate I will need another instance of APRSISCE, TNC and radio.

          Whether or not you need another instance depends on the full scope of
          what you're trying to do. I have a single IGate (KJ4ERJ-1) that I use
          interactively when I want to do direct local APRS on the RF network.
          Sometimes I switch it over and use it to work the ISS digipeater or just
          monitor the ISS frequency in a SatGate operation if I happen to notice a
          pass.

          > I am not all that knowledgeable on APRS and Igates.

          There's plenty of folks here that can lend a hand, I'm sure.

          > I have been using UISS and AGW to successfully connect to the ISS, but the email is not getting picked up and sent on. For this setup I am not using AGW. The documentation seems to say it is not necessarily needed.

          I'm not familiar with UISS, but you've got words in there (like
          "connect" and "picked up") that imply that you're trying to work the
          packet station on the ISS and not the APRS digipeater. Can you clarify
          what you mean by the above statements?

          > First let me say that I have never seen as many trace logs as this program has. Nice job Lynn .

          Thanks. I really need to go through and eliminate some as they're now
          actually obsolete and non-informative to the point of confusion.

          > I have tried to follow the documentation to set up the first part. I am getting some error codes and I am not sure what I have set up wrong.
          >
          > Here are some traces I captured.
          >
          > Trace KF5ELB <-> CQ:
          >
          > 10:48:37 New Chat Between KF5ELB and CQ on 2013-11-19
          > 10:50:08> :EMAIL :lenleslie@... Hello from Len, 73 KF5ELB (*2-10:50:08)

          Ok, this is a strange one. Did you open a chat to "CQ" and then send
          the text :EMAIL...? If so, that's not really going to get you any where.

          What you probably wanted to do was open a chat to "EMAIL" and put the
          text "lenleslie@flash..." and send it. APRSISCE/32 takes care of
          building the APRS packet in the proper format for sending an APRS message.

          > Trace Messages:
          >
          > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:37.702 New Chat(KF5ELB<>CQ) hwnd(001D01DC) Error(6)
          > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:50:08.312 To(CQ) Msg(:EMAIL :lenleslie@... Hello from Len, 73 KF5ELB) NoAck
          > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:50:08.312 Sending Message For(CQ) by New
          >
          > Getting error 6
          > Is NEW correct?

          I think this is one of those trace logs that are confusing. As long as
          hwnd() is non-zero, the error is actually left over from some other
          operation. And yes, New is correct in the context of this trace.

          > Trace MyCall:
          >
          > 2013-11-19T22:23:50.750 [Telemetry] KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#329,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
          > 2013-11-19T22:39:50.750 [Telemetry] KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#330,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
          > 2013-11-19T22:48:42.125 [TransmitAPRS] KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :@224842h3031.22N/09751.48W-PHG3000APRS-IS for Win32

          This trace will just show you every packet that mentions your base
          callsign and where it was detected. It's there to see if you've seen
          any packets that mention you while possibly not be addressed to you.

          > Trace Transmit:
          >
          > 2013-11-19T22:23:50.750 Transmit(INT) KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#329,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
          > 2013-11-19T22:39:50.750 Transmit(INT) KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :T#330,100,048,002,500,000,10000000
          > 2013-11-19T22:48:42.125 Transmit(INT) KF5ELB>APWW10,B/ARISS :@224842h3031.22N/09751.48W-PHG3000APRS-IS for Win32

          The first two telemetry packets as Internal make sense. I'm not sure
          why the posit packet is only INT, but it depends on a bunch of other flags.

          However, the path term of "B/ARISS" is definitely incorrect. I'd
          recommend that you get familiar with the terrestrial APRS network before
          jumping into the deep end of the pool with the ISS. Set your Configure
          / Beacon / Path to WIDE2-1 and the radio to 144.390 or whatever your
          local APRS frequency is to get used to the program and APRS operations.

          > Trace Port PK88:
          >
          > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:53.765 Opening COM1 Got -1 Error 5
          > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:53.765 Status 0 Error 0 At 228 in c:\compass\code\aprs\aprsisce\cprtns.c
          > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:53.765 Error Opening COM1:0,N,8,1 LastError 0
          > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Opening COM1:0,N,8,1
          > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Opening COM1 with 4 Args
          > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Opening COM1 Got -1 Error 5
          > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Status 0 Error 0 At 228 in c:\compass\code\aprs\aprsisce\cprtns.c
          > Port(pk88):2013-11-19T16:48:58.765 Error Opening COM1:0,N,8,1 LastError 0
          >
          > Get error 5 - Is that because it gets an error opening com 1 the first time and then Error 0 means it opened Com 1 successfully?

          This is where the true errors start. You have your PK88 port configured
          to use COM1, but with a zero baud rate and worse, APRSISCE/32 isn't able
          to open that COM port, possibly because you have some other program
          using it at the same time. First, go to Configure / Ports / PK88 and
          click Device and correct the baud rate. Then open the trace log and
          make sure it is Enabled. It'll tell you lots of stuff.

          Are you able to talk to the PK88 on COM1 from a terminal emulator? Are
          you sure no other program was accessing COM1 when you captured the above
          log?

          > Trace Port Packets:
          >
          > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:23.687 Growing PortPackets from 0 to 16 - Increment
          > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:23.687 Initializing PortPackets[0/1] for RfPort:0 - Increment was 0 for pk88
          > WinMain:2013-11-19T16:48:24.140 Initializing PortPackets[1/2] for RfPort:1111 - Increment was 0 for *Internal*
          >
          > Are the RFPort 1111 and *Internal* OK?

          Yes, this is all fine.

          > At the top of the map I have PK88 OK and under it is disabled. Should I have something enabled that is turned off. I have Internet access, OSM Fetch, sound, port for PK88 and logging enabled.

          Check out http://aprsisce.wikidot.com/doc:screen-elements and identify
          the screen area that you're seeing "PK88 OK" in . it should be #27. If
          it says "Disabled" below that, it means that you've got position
          beaconing disabled (check Enables / Beaconing Enabled).

          > Any help will be appreciated.

          See where this takes you and please delete any sections you don't think
          we need to go further with in your reply.

          Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32

        • James Ewen
          On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 5:12 PM, Steve Daniels ... I don t think so based on the example given. It looks like he s going to attempt to bounce a message packet
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 19, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 5:12 PM, Steve Daniels
            <steve@...> wrote:

            > I think he might be trying to use the PMS on the ISS, which frustrates most APRS users.

            I don't think so based on the example given.

            It looks like he's going to attempt to bounce a message packet off the
            ISS digipeater, hope to get someone to gate it to the APRS-IS stream,
            where the EMAIL server will then push the email into the internet, and
            deliver it back to him via his email program.

            This is a long convoluted process to talk to one's self. It would be
            easier to go sit in front of a mirror and carry on a conversation.

            As Steve indicated, connecting to the BBS onboard the ISS is frowned
            upon as only one user can access the device at a time, and if the bird
            goes out of range, it has to time out. The satellites are a precious
            resource, and the people on the ground who like to operate the
            satellites generally understand that concept. When you get someone who
            decides to hog the satellite for the whole pass, you get a lot of
            people on the ground upset. Just like the terrestrial RF network, the
            satellite digipeater needs to be shared by everyone equally.

            The concept is to listen, then once you hear the satellite, send your
            packet and listen for the digipeat. When you hear the digipeat, you
            know you have successfully sent a packet to the satellite, and back.
            You then listen for the rest of the pass. Notice that there's a lot of
            listen, and only one send. Having a station set up to automatically
            send on the satellite frequency, ie beacon once a minute unattended is
            frowned upon. Your station could be potentially blocking the attempts
            of a live person who is actively trying to participate in the hobby.

            When you send a packet to the digipeater on the ISS, it will digipeat
            the packet right back down again. There's no need to send the packet
            to an i-gate and on to an email server to send the packet back to your
            computer to prove that the ISS digipeated the packet. You can tell the
            ISS digipeated the packet by listening to the frequency for the
            digipeat.

            Now, if someone is planning a tour out in the boonies well away from
            the terrestrial APRS network, and is going to haul a ground based
            satellite station, keep track of the passes, and attempt to send
            health and safety checks to an individual monitoring the trek via
            email, that might be a reason to go through all the trouble.

            I would however opt for the easier path... teach the non-ham how to
            look at aprs.fi for location updates, and where to look for messages.
            The station in the boonies would then only have to send position
            reports with status, and if desired, could send a generic APRS message
            with the desired information contained within. No worries about
            formatting email messages, gating to the internet, etc... that's
            already in place because other people are already playing with the
            satellites.

            Have a look here to see who's playing on the ISS...

            --
            James
            VE6SRV
          • Steve Daniels
            Yes does seem overly complicated, I have noticed I sometimes don t here my own digipeat, so I run a separate instance to see if I was heard and gated by
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 20, 2013
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              Yes does seem overly complicated, I have noticed I sometimes don’t here my own digipeat, so I run a separate instance to see if I was heard and gated by someone else

              For an I am ok status I would probably just change my beacon text

               

              I agree with everything James says in his message

               

              Steve Daniels

              Amateur Radio Callsign G6UIM

              Torbay Freecycle  Owner

              http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/torbay_freecycle

              APRSISCE/32 Beta tester and WIKI editor http://aprsisce.wikidot.com

               


              From: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com [mailto: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of James Ewen
              Sent: 20 November 2013 03:40
              To: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [aprsisce] Configure APRSISCE for ISS

               

               

              On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 5:12 PM, Steve Daniels
              <steve@...> wrote:

              > I think he might be trying to use the PMS on the ISS, which frustrates
              most APRS users.

              I don't think so based on the example given.

              It looks like he's going to attempt to bounce a message packet off the
              ISS digipeater, hope to get someone to gate it to the APRS-IS stream,
              where the EMAIL server will then push the email into the internet, and
              deliver it back to him via his email program.

              This is a long convoluted process to talk to one's self. It would be
              easier to go sit in front of a mirror and carry on a conversation.

              As Steve indicated, connecting to the BBS onboard the ISS is frowned
              upon as only one user can access the device at a time, and if the bird
              goes out of range, it has to time out. The satellites are a precious
              resource, and the people on the ground who like to operate the
              satellites generally understand that concept. When you get someone who
              decides to hog the satellite for the whole pass, you get a lot of
              people on the ground upset. Just like the terrestrial RF network, the
              satellite digipeater needs to be shared by everyone equally.

              The concept is to listen, then once you hear the satellite, send your
              packet and listen for the digipeat. When you hear the digipeat, you
              know you have successfully sent a packet to the satellite, and back.
              You then listen for the rest of the pass. Notice that there's a lot of
              listen, and only one send. Having a station set up to automatically
              send on the satellite frequency, ie beacon once a minute unattended is
              frowned upon. Your station could be potentially blocking the attempts
              of a live person who is actively trying to participate in the hobby.

              When you send a packet to the digipeater on the ISS, it will digipeat
              the packet right back down again. There's no need to send the packet
              to an i-gate and on to an email server to send the packet back to your
              computer to prove that the ISS digipeated the packet. You can tell the
              ISS digipeated the packet by listening to the frequency for the
              digipeat.

              Now, if someone is planning a tour out in the boonies well away from
              the terrestrial APRS network, and is going to haul a ground based
              satellite station, keep track of the passes, and attempt to send
              health and safety checks to an individual monitoring the trek via
              email, that might be a reason to go through all the trouble.

              I would however opt for the easier path... teach the non-ham how to
              look at aprs.fi for location updates, and where to look for messages.
              The station in the boonies would then only have to send position
              reports with status, and if desired, could send a generic APRS message
              with the desired information contained within. No worries about
              formatting email messages, gating to the internet, etc... that's
              already in place because other people are already playing with the
              satellites.

              Have a look here to see who's playing on the ISS...

              --
              James
              VE6SRV

            • Phillip Tompkins
              I followed these directions http://aprsisce.wikidot.com/doc:satelliteops Then followed up on http://www.ariss.net/ to see if things worked right (KD7QOT-2).
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 20, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                I followed these directions

                Then followed up on http://www.ariss.net/ to see if things worked right (KD7QOT-2).  The first day I messed up and had some options checked on the APRS-IS configuration that I should not have, but then read the directions again and the second day I had success.

                I basically took the aprsisce folder and made a copy of it.  When I'm running normal aprs I launch one copy.  when I want to work the sat I close the aprs copy and then launch the copy i made with all of my configurations for ISS.  I'm sure there is a much better way, but this works for me for now :)

                73's
                Phillip


                On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 10:40 PM, James Ewen <ve6srv@...> wrote:
                 

                On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 5:12 PM, Steve Daniels
                <steve@...> wrote:

                > I think he might be trying to use the PMS on the ISS, which frustrates most APRS users.

                I don't think so based on the example given.

                It looks like he's going to attempt to bounce a message packet off the
                ISS digipeater, hope to get someone to gate it to the APRS-IS stream,
                where the EMAIL server will then push the email into the internet, and
                deliver it back to him via his email program.

                This is a long convoluted process to talk to one's self. It would be
                easier to go sit in front of a mirror and carry on a conversation.

                As Steve indicated, connecting to the BBS onboard the ISS is frowned
                upon as only one user can access the device at a time, and if the bird
                goes out of range, it has to time out. The satellites are a precious
                resource, and the people on the ground who like to operate the
                satellites generally understand that concept. When you get someone who
                decides to hog the satellite for the whole pass, you get a lot of
                people on the ground upset. Just like the terrestrial RF network, the
                satellite digipeater needs to be shared by everyone equally.

                The concept is to listen, then once you hear the satellite, send your
                packet and listen for the digipeat. When you hear the digipeat, you
                know you have successfully sent a packet to the satellite, and back.
                You then listen for the rest of the pass. Notice that there's a lot of
                listen, and only one send. Having a station set up to automatically
                send on the satellite frequency, ie beacon once a minute unattended is
                frowned upon. Your station could be potentially blocking the attempts
                of a live person who is actively trying to participate in the hobby.

                When you send a packet to the digipeater on the ISS, it will digipeat
                the packet right back down again. There's no need to send the packet
                to an i-gate and on to an email server to send the packet back to your
                computer to prove that the ISS digipeated the packet. You can tell the
                ISS digipeated the packet by listening to the frequency for the
                digipeat.

                Now, if someone is planning a tour out in the boonies well away from
                the terrestrial APRS network, and is going to haul a ground based
                satellite station, keep track of the passes, and attempt to send
                health and safety checks to an individual monitoring the trek via
                email, that might be a reason to go through all the trouble.

                I would however opt for the easier path... teach the non-ham how to
                look at aprs.fi for location updates, and where to look for messages.
                The station in the boonies would then only have to send position
                reports with status, and if desired, could send a generic APRS message
                with the desired information contained within. No worries about
                formatting email messages, gating to the internet, etc... that's
                already in place because other people are already playing with the
                satellites.

                Have a look here to see who's playing on the ISS...

                --
                James
                VE6SRV




                --
                Phillip Tompkins
                Secure your communications

                Instant Message me secure: http://pidgin.im with http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/ encryption free
                iPhone Secure Messaging App: ChatSecure   Droid Secure Messaging App: GibberBot
                My Public S/MIME Key download: http://www.cenology.com/public-key.zip
                Thumb Print: 31 72 f0 01 37 55 cb bb e0 c1 33 55 5c fe 79 7b 34 46 47 8c
                Free PGP encryption: http://www.gpg4win.de/index.html
                My PGP Public Key download: http://www.cenology.com/p-public-pgp.zip
                Finger Print: 81FB8C481A794B948D94BE2EE6FD0D56CD2AD603
              • Rob Giuliano
                There are ways to minimize disk space use, especially if your second copy has all the map tiles as a subdirectory.   On The Other Hand, why mess with success?
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 20, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  There are ways to minimize disk space use, especially if your second copy has all the map tiles as a subdirectory.
                   
                  On The Other Hand, why mess with success?
                  If it works, and you aren't stressed fro space - keep using it as is!
                   
                  Robert Giuliano
                  KB8RCO


                  ---------------------------------------------

                  From: Phillip Tompkins <ptompkins@...>
                  To: aprsisce@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 10:08 AM
                  Subject: Re: [aprsisce] Configure APRSISCE for ISS

                   
                  I followed these directions

                  Then followed up on http://www.ariss.net/ to see if things worked right (KD7QOT-2).  The first day I messed up and had some options checked on the APRS-IS configuration that I should not have, but then read the directions again and the second day I had success.

                  I basically took the aprsisce folder and made a copy of it.  When I'm running normal aprs I launch one copy.  when I want to work the sat I close the aprs copy and then launch the copy i made with all of my configurations for ISS.  I'm sure there is a much better way, but this works for me for now :)

                  73's
                  Phillip


                  On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 10:40 PM, James Ewen <ve6srv@...> wrote:
                   
                  On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 5:12 PM, Steve Daniels
                  <steve@...> wrote:

                  > I think he might be trying to use the PMS on the ISS, which frustrates most APRS users.

                  I don't think so based on the example given.

                  It looks like he's going to attempt to bounce a message packet off the
                  ISS digipeater, hope to get someone to gate it to the APRS-IS stream,
                  where the EMAIL server will then push the email into the internet, and
                  deliver it back to him via his email program.

                  This is a long convoluted process to talk to one's self. It would be
                  easier to go sit in front of a mirror and carry on a conversation.

                  As Steve indicated, connecting to the BBS onboard the ISS is frowned
                  upon as only one user can access the device at a time, and if the bird
                  goes out of range, it has to time out. The satellites are a precious
                  resource, and the people on the ground who like to operate the
                  satellites generally understand that concept. When you get someone who
                  decides to hog the satellite for the whole pass, you get a lot of
                  people on the ground upset. Just like the terrestrial RF network, the
                  satellite digipeater needs to be shared by everyone equally.

                  The concept is to listen, then once you hear the satellite, send your
                  packet and listen for the digipeat. When you hear the digipeat, you
                  know you have successfully sent a packet to the satellite, and back.
                  You then listen for the rest of the pass. Notice that there's a lot of
                  listen, and only one send. Having a station set up to automatically
                  send on the satellite frequency, ie beacon once a minute unattended is
                  frowned upon. Your station could be potentially blocking the attempts
                  of a live person who is actively trying to participate in the hobby.

                  When you send a packet to the digipeater on the ISS, it will digipeat
                  the packet right back down again. There's no need to send the packet
                  to an i-gate and on to an email server to send the packet back to your
                  computer to prove that the ISS digipeated the packet. You can tell the
                  ISS digipeated the packet by listening to the frequency for the
                  digipeat.

                  Now, if someone is planning a tour out in the boonies well away from
                  the terrestrial APRS network, and is going to haul a ground based
                  satellite station, keep track of the passes, and attempt to send
                  health and safety checks to an individual monitoring the trek via
                  email, that might be a reason to go through all the trouble.

                  I would however opt for the easier path... teach the non-ham how to
                  look at aprs.fi for location updates, and where to look for messages.
                  The station in the boonies would then only have to send position
                  reports with status, and if desired, could send a generic APRS message
                  with the desired information contained within. No worries about
                  formatting email messages, gating to the internet, etc... that's
                  already in place because other people are already playing with the
                  satellites.

                  Have a look here to see who's playing on the ISS...

                  --
                  James
                  VE6SRV



                  --
                  Phillip Tompkins
                  Secure your communications

                  Instant Message me secure: http://pidgin.im/ with http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/ encryption free
                  iPhone Secure Messaging App: ChatSecure   Droid Secure Messaging App: GibberBot
                  My Public S/MIME Key download: http://www.cenology.com/public-key.zip
                  Thumb Print: 31 72 f0 01 37 55 cb bb e0 c1 33 55 5c fe 79 7b 34 46 47 8c
                  Free PGP encryption: http://www.gpg4win.de/index.html
                  My PGP Public Key download: http://www.cenology.com/p-public-pgp.zip
                  Finger Print: 81FB8C481A794B948D94BE2EE6FD0D56CD2AD603


                • Lynn W Deffenbaugh (Mr)
                  Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32 That is actually the easiest, simplest, and safest way to do it! At least until some
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 20, 2013
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                    Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32
                    That is actually the easiest, simplest, and safest way to do it!  At least until some software author gets off his duff to support near-dynamic switching of configuration files within a single instance...

                    Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32

                    On 11/20/2013 10:08 AM, Phillip Tompkins wrote:
                    I followed these directions

                    Then followed up on http://www.ariss.net/ to see if things worked right (KD7QOT-2).  The first day I messed up and had some options checked on the APRS-IS configuration that I should not have, but then read the directions again and the second day I had success.

                    I basically took the aprsisce folder and made a copy of it.  When I'm running normal aprs I launch one copy.  when I want to work the sat I close the aprs copy and then launch the copy i made with all of my configurations for ISS.  I'm sure there is a much better way, but this works for me for now :)

                    73's
                    Phillip


                    On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 10:40 PM, James Ewen <ve6srv@...> wrote:
                     
                    On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 5:12 PM, Steve Daniels
                    <steve@...> wrote:

                    > I think he might be trying to use the PMS on the ISS, which frustrates most APRS users.

                    I don't think so based on the example given.

                    It looks like he's going to attempt to bounce a message packet off the
                    ISS digipeater, hope to get someone to gate it to the APRS-IS stream,
                    where the EMAIL server will then push the email into the internet, and
                    deliver it back to him via his email program.

                    This is a long convoluted process to talk to one's self. It would be
                    easier to go sit in front of a mirror and carry on a conversation.

                    As Steve indicated, connecting to the BBS onboard the ISS is frowned
                    upon as only one user can access the device at a time, and if the bird
                    goes out of range, it has to time out. The satellites are a precious
                    resource, and the people on the ground who like to operate the
                    satellites generally understand that concept. When you get someone who
                    decides to hog the satellite for the whole pass, you get a lot of
                    people on the ground upset. Just like the terrestrial RF network, the
                    satellite digipeater needs to be shared by everyone equally.

                    The concept is to listen, then once you hear the satellite, send your
                    packet and listen for the digipeat. When you hear the digipeat, you
                    know you have successfully sent a packet to the satellite, and back.
                    You then listen for the rest of the pass. Notice that there's a lot of
                    listen, and only one send. Having a station set up to automatically
                    send on the satellite frequency, ie beacon once a minute unattended is
                    frowned upon. Your station could be potentially blocking the attempts
                    of a live person who is actively trying to participate in the hobby.

                    When you send a packet to the digipeater on the ISS, it will digipeat
                    the packet right back down again. There's no need to send the packet
                    to an i-gate and on to an email server to send the packet back to your
                    computer to prove that the ISS digipeated the packet. You can tell the
                    ISS digipeated the packet by listening to the frequency for the
                    digipeat.

                    Now, if someone is planning a tour out in the boonies well away from
                    the terrestrial APRS network, and is going to haul a ground based
                    satellite station, keep track of the passes, and attempt to send
                    health and safety checks to an individual monitoring the trek via
                    email, that might be a reason to go through all the trouble.

                    I would however opt for the easier path... teach the non-ham how to
                    look at aprs.fi for location updates, and where to look for messages.
                    The station in the boonies would then only have to send position
                    reports with status, and if desired, could send a generic APRS message
                    with the desired information contained within. No worries about
                    formatting email messages, gating to the internet, etc... that's
                    already in place because other people are already playing with the
                    satellites.

                    Have a look here to see who's playing on the ISS...

                    --
                    James
                    VE6SRV



                    --
                    Phillip Tompkins
                    Secure your communications

                    Instant Message me secure: http://pidgin.im with http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/ encryption free
                    iPhone Secure Messaging App: ChatSecure   Droid Secure Messaging App: GibberBot
                    My Public S/MIME Key download: http://www.cenology.com/public-key.zip
                    Thumb Print: 31 72 f0 01 37 55 cb bb e0 c1 33 55 5c fe 79 7b 34 46 47 8c
                    Free PGP encryption: http://www.gpg4win.de/index.html
                    My PGP Public Key download: http://www.cenology.com/p-public-pgp.zip
                    Finger Print: 81FB8C481A794B948D94BE2EE6FD0D56CD2AD603

                  • lenkf5elb
                    Lynn, I had a long reply prepared and got waylaid for a while. I have been reading your reply and the documentation since. I am clearer on some things now. At
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 26, 2013
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                      Lynn,
                      I had a long reply prepared and got waylaid for a while. I have been reading your reply and the documentation since. I am clearer on some things now. At any rate I left part of the reply to your questions below to tell you what I am trying to do.

                      I have sent packets to the ISS, received confirms back and one email was returned while I was using UISS so, yes I have connected to COM1. Somehow the traces I sent were not an indicator of where I am in the process using APRSISCE. Not sure what happened there. So I have decided to not waste your time and after I do some research and testing I will be back with more questions or a success story.

                      Thanks for your help and time.

                      Len KF5ELB

                      ****************
                      Based on what I see below, by "send email packets" do you mean that
                      you're sending an APRS message to the EMAIL address for subsequent
                      sending via the Internet by that service?

                      --Yes

                      I'm not familiar with UISS, but you've got words in there (like
                      "connect" and "picked up") that imply that you're trying to work the
                      packet station on the ISS and not the APRS digipeater. Can you clarify
                      what you mean by the above statements?

                      – Sorry for my bad terminology.

                      – I know connect is not the right word. I am sending a packet with an email in it to the ISS digipeater, The digipeater sends a confirmation back to me that it got it and broadcasts the packet. If a SatGgt is listening it will pass the packet on to an Igate that will send the email to the address in the packet via the internet.

                      Ok, this is a strange one. Did you open a chat to "CQ" and then send
                      the text :EMAIL...? If so, that's not really going to get you any where.

                      What you probably wanted to do was open a chat to "EMAIL" and put the
                      text "lenleslie@flash..." and send it. APRSISCE/32 takes care of
                      building the APRS packet in the proper format for sending an APRS message.

                      – Yes, that is what I wanted to do. As I was looking at it it didn't make sense to send an email to the ISS so I opened the chat to a CQ and entered :Email into the message area. Now it is clearer.
                    • lenkf5elb
                      Hi, I have been in the hospital and recovering and missed this string of posts. I did send the last one because Lynn had been kind enough to post to my first
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 28, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi,
                        I have been in the hospital and recovering and missed this string of posts. I did send the last one because Lynn had been kind enough to post to my first questions and I felt I owed him something. Now I feel I have to defend myself.

                        Let me ask a few questions (with a smile on). I am a fairly new ham and am always trying new things. Ham Radio has so much to offer. I am also on a shoestring budget.

                        Another ham turned me on to the satellite and ISS stuff. I guess to people who have done this all their life it is ho-hum. Do you know the thrill I got when I sent out a packet to the ISS and got a confirmation back? I was ecstatic. I told the ham that I had done it and he said 'well that's all well and good but I hate to tell you, no one picked you up and sent an email'. I said 'I don't care, I did it'. To me that was a big deal.

                        So let me ask you (kindly), What is a big deal to you? Or is ham radio not supposed to give you a thrill of accomplishment?

                        Not only did I set up my radio, TNC and computer to do this, but I worked with another ham to build a turnstile to see if I could improve my chances. The answer was yes. Another thrill.

                        As to why I would want to send an email to myself. I start out with baby steps. Why on earth would I send my first email to the Queen of England. You have to start someplace. Its a test. I do the best to read and understand what I am doing before I do it, but I don't always get it right.

                        It is people like the folks on this forum that I depend on for help and guidance. Now, Lynn was right. I probably should have understood terrestrial APRS more before I tried this. I have done a lot with packets and APRS through ARES. I don't know all of the ins and outs, but one thing I have learned is you don't learn anything by setting on your hands.

                        I would like to know how I hear the digipeater to know if is in range? I have a TNC and the interface to the radio uses the speaker output. Maybe one of the traces?

                        I tried this a year or so back and was told by folks on this forum to under no circumstances try to contact the ISS BBS. I never have.

                        So let me ask. Why is there a digipeater on the ISS? Is it to send a packet off thru space to get a confirmation back or is there a real use for it? Can it be used in time of emergency? Is it just a toy? I don't think so, but I have to start somewhere and it would be nice if I could go somewhere for help and not get belittled for sending an email to myself.

                        So, tell me why I should or shouldn't be doing this and I will respect your replies.

                        73's Len KF5ELB

                        --- In aprsisce@yahoogroups.com, James Ewen <ve6srv@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 5:12 PM, Steve Daniels
                        > <steve@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > I think he might be trying to use the PMS on the ISS, which frustrates most APRS users.
                        >
                        > I don't think so based on the example given.
                        >
                        > It looks like he's going to attempt to bounce a message packet off the
                        > ISS digipeater, hope to get someone to gate it to the APRS-IS stream,
                        > where the EMAIL server will then push the email into the internet, and
                        > deliver it back to him via his email program.
                        >
                        > This is a long convoluted process to talk to one's self. It would be
                        > easier to go sit in front of a mirror and carry on a conversation.
                        >
                        > As Steve indicated, connecting to the BBS onboard the ISS is frowned
                        > upon as only one user can access the device at a time, and if the bird
                        > goes out of range, it has to time out. The satellites are a precious
                        > resource, and the people on the ground who like to operate the
                        > satellites generally understand that concept. When you get someone who
                        > decides to hog the satellite for the whole pass, you get a lot of
                        > people on the ground upset. Just like the terrestrial RF network, the
                        > satellite digipeater needs to be shared by everyone equally.
                        >
                        > The concept is to listen, then once you hear the satellite, send your
                        > packet and listen for the digipeat. When you hear the digipeat, you
                        > know you have successfully sent a packet to the satellite, and back.
                        > You then listen for the rest of the pass. Notice that there's a lot of
                        > listen, and only one send. Having a station set up to automatically
                        > send on the satellite frequency, ie beacon once a minute unattended is
                        > frowned upon. Your station could be potentially blocking the attempts
                        > of a live person who is actively trying to participate in the hobby.
                        >
                        > When you send a packet to the digipeater on the ISS, it will digipeat
                        > the packet right back down again. There's no need to send the packet
                        > to an i-gate and on to an email server to send the packet back to your
                        > computer to prove that the ISS digipeated the packet. You can tell the
                        > ISS digipeated the packet by listening to the frequency for the
                        > digipeat.
                        >
                        > Now, if someone is planning a tour out in the boonies well away from
                        > the terrestrial APRS network, and is going to haul a ground based
                        > satellite station, keep track of the passes, and attempt to send
                        > health and safety checks to an individual monitoring the trek via
                        > email, that might be a reason to go through all the trouble.
                        >
                        > I would however opt for the easier path... teach the non-ham how to
                        > look at aprs.fi for location updates, and where to look for messages.
                        > The station in the boonies would then only have to send position
                        > reports with status, and if desired, could send a generic APRS message
                        > with the desired information contained within. No worries about
                        > formatting email messages, gating to the internet, etc... that's
                        > already in place because other people are already playing with the
                        > satellites.
                        >
                        > Have a look here to see who's playing on the ISS...
                        >
                        > --
                        > James
                        > VE6SRV
                        >
                      • Don Rolph
                        I will give my take Len. Are you having fun? If so, keep it up!! And congratulations on your efforts!! 73, AB1PH Don Rolph
                        Message 11 of 13 , Nov 29, 2013
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I will give my take Len.

                          Are you having fun?

                          If so, keep it  up!!

                          And congratulations on your efforts!!

                          73,
                          AB1PH
                          Don Rolph


                          On Fri, Nov 29, 2013 at 12:24 AM, lenkf5elb <lenleslie@...> wrote:
                           

                          Hi,
                          I have been in the hospital and recovering and missed this string of posts. I did send the last one because Lynn had been kind enough to post to my first questions and I felt I owed him something. Now I feel I have to defend myself.

                          Let me ask a few questions (with a smile on). I am a fairly new ham and am always trying new things. Ham Radio has so much to offer. I am also on a shoestring budget.

                          Another ham turned me on to the satellite and ISS stuff. I guess to people who have done this all their life it is ho-hum. Do you know the thrill I got when I sent out a packet to the ISS and got a confirmation back? I was ecstatic. I told the ham that I had done it and he said 'well that's all well and good but I hate to tell you, no one picked you up and sent an email'. I said 'I don't care, I did it'. To me that was a big deal.

                          So let me ask you (kindly), What is a big deal to you? Or is ham radio not supposed to give you a thrill of accomplishment?

                          Not only did I set up my radio, TNC and computer to do this, but I worked with another ham to build a turnstile to see if I could improve my chances. The answer was yes. Another thrill.

                          As to why I would want to send an email to myself. I start out with baby steps. Why on earth would I send my first email to the Queen of England. You have to start someplace. Its a test. I do the best to read and understand what I am doing before I do it, but I don't always get it right.

                          It is people like the folks on this forum that I depend on for help and guidance. Now, Lynn was right. I probably should have understood terrestrial APRS more before I tried this. I have done a lot with packets and APRS through ARES. I don't know all of the ins and outs, but one thing I have learned is you don't learn anything by setting on your hands.

                          I would like to know how I hear the digipeater to know if is in range? I have a TNC and the interface to the radio uses the speaker output. Maybe one of the traces?

                          I tried this a year or so back and was told by folks on this forum to under no circumstances try to contact the ISS BBS. I never have.

                          So let me ask. Why is there a digipeater on the ISS? Is it to send a packet off thru space to get a confirmation back or is there a real use for it? Can it be used in time of emergency? Is it just a toy? I don't think so, but I have to start somewhere and it would be nice if I could go somewhere for help and not get belittled for sending an email to myself.

                          So, tell me why I should or shouldn't be doing this and I will respect your replies.

                          73's Len KF5ELB


                          --- In aprsisce@yahoogroups.com, James Ewen <ve6srv@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 5:12 PM, Steve Daniels
                          > <steve@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > I think he might be trying to use the PMS on the ISS, which frustrates most APRS users.
                          >
                          > I don't think so based on the example given.
                          >
                          > It looks like he's going to attempt to bounce a message packet off the
                          > ISS digipeater, hope to get someone to gate it to the APRS-IS stream,
                          > where the EMAIL server will then push the email into the internet, and
                          > deliver it back to him via his email program.
                          >
                          > This is a long convoluted process to talk to one's self. It would be
                          > easier to go sit in front of a mirror and carry on a conversation.
                          >
                          > As Steve indicated, connecting to the BBS onboard the ISS is frowned
                          > upon as only one user can access the device at a time, and if the bird
                          > goes out of range, it has to time out. The satellites are a precious
                          > resource, and the people on the ground who like to operate the
                          > satellites generally understand that concept. When you get someone who
                          > decides to hog the satellite for the whole pass, you get a lot of
                          > people on the ground upset. Just like the terrestrial RF network, the
                          > satellite digipeater needs to be shared by everyone equally.
                          >
                          > The concept is to listen, then once you hear the satellite, send your
                          > packet and listen for the digipeat. When you hear the digipeat, you
                          > know you have successfully sent a packet to the satellite, and back.
                          > You then listen for the rest of the pass. Notice that there's a lot of
                          > listen, and only one send. Having a station set up to automatically
                          > send on the satellite frequency, ie beacon once a minute unattended is
                          > frowned upon. Your station could be potentially blocking the attempts
                          > of a live person who is actively trying to participate in the hobby.
                          >
                          > When you send a packet to the digipeater on the ISS, it will digipeat
                          > the packet right back down again. There's no need to send the packet
                          > to an i-gate and on to an email server to send the packet back to your
                          > computer to prove that the ISS digipeated the packet. You can tell the
                          > ISS digipeated the packet by listening to the frequency for the
                          > digipeat.
                          >
                          > Now, if someone is planning a tour out in the boonies well away from
                          > the terrestrial APRS network, and is going to haul a ground based
                          > satellite station, keep track of the passes, and attempt to send
                          > health and safety checks to an individual monitoring the trek via
                          > email, that might be a reason to go through all the trouble.
                          >
                          > I would however opt for the easier path... teach the non-ham how to
                          > look at aprs.fi for location updates, and where to look for messages.
                          > The station in the boonies would then only have to send position
                          > reports with status, and if desired, could send a generic APRS message
                          > with the desired information contained within. No worries about
                          > formatting email messages, gating to the internet, etc... that's
                          > already in place because other people are already playing with the
                          > satellites.
                          >
                          > Have a look here to see who's playing on the ISS...
                          >
                          > --
                          > James
                          > VE6SRV
                          >


                        • James Ewen
                          ... It s unfortunate that you feel that you have been attacked, requiring defense. ... You re on the right track... I don t know that there s much in the ham
                          Message 12 of 13 , Nov 29, 2013
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                            On Thu, Nov 28, 2013 at 10:24 PM, lenkf5elb <lenleslie@...> wrote:

                            > Now I feel I have to defend myself.

                            It's unfortunate that you feel that you have been attacked, requiring defense.

                            > Another ham turned me on to the satellite and ISS stuff. I guess to
                            > people who have done this all their life it is ho-hum. Do you know
                            > the thrill I got when I sent out a packet to the ISS and got a
                            > confirmation back? I was ecstatic. I told the ham that I had done
                            > it and he said 'well that's all well and good but I hate to tell you,
                            > no one picked you up and sent an email'. I said 'I don't care, I did it'.
                            > To me that was a big deal.
                            >
                            > So let me ask you (kindly), What is a big deal to you? Or is ham radio
                            > not supposed to give you a thrill of accomplishment?

                            You're on the right track... I don't know that there's much in the ham
                            radio world that has an ultimate goal that just has to be
                            accomplished. It's mostly about self-satisfaction. You were able to
                            set a goal, and attain that goal. When I worked at the local ham radio
                            store, a co-worker would come in in the morning, and say "I talked to
                            a Russia last night". The running joke was "So how's Yuri, his wife
                            and kids?" What's the ultimate goal of getting a callsign, and an RST
                            report from a stranger halfway around the world? You don't talk with
                            the guy, it's just a quick exchange of almost random characters. But,
                            if that's your ultimate goal, and it makes you happy, then you have
                            been successful.

                            I like building things... a couple of us in Northern Alberta have
                            deployed about 20 digipeaters. Outside of Edmonton, there are maybe 20
                            APRS users. Our digipeater network makes more noise than the users,
                            but we had fun building it, and it is there to be used. I also fly
                            high altitude balloons. I get similar questions from others there "Why
                            do you fly these balloons?" It's for the challenge of building a
                            payload that performs a task, and allows us to recover. A fellow
                            balloonatic in our group came up with a better explanation for the
                            Discovery Channel TV crew that was filming us one day. He said "It's
                            kind of like why does a dog chase a ball? We just have to throw our
                            own ball before we can chase it!"


                            > Not only did I set up my radio, TNC and computer to do this, but I
                            > worked with another ham to build a turnstile to see if I could improve
                            > my chances. The answer was yes. Another thrill.

                            There's your answer... you set a challenge, and you are working to
                            meet the challenge.

                            > As to why I would want to send an email to myself. I start out with
                            > baby steps. Why on earth would I send my first email to the Queen
                            > of England. You have to start someplace. Its a test. I do the best
                            > to read and understand what I am doing before I do it, but I don't always get it right.

                            Okay, there's a bit of a challenge with this though. You're sending
                            and receiving on a simplex channel. Your RX i-gate needs to be far
                            enough away from the sending station so it can't hear the sending
                            station, and HAS to hear only the digipeat from the ISS.

                            > I would like to know how I hear the digipeater to know if is in range?
                            > I have a TNC and the interface to the radio uses the speaker output.
                            > Maybe one of the traces?

                            Listen to the RF channel... you'll hear the audio. Watch the packet
                            log, or the raw data. You'll see the digipeat come back.

                            > So let me ask. Why is there a digipeater on the ISS? Is it to send
                            > a packet off thru space to get a confirmation back or is there a
                            > real use for it? Can it be used in time of emergency? Is it just a toy?
                            > I don't think so, but I have to start somewhere and it would be nice
                            > if I could go somewhere for help and not get belittled for sending
                            > an email to myself.

                            There's a digipeater up there because someone wanted to do it, and got
                            it done. For the most part, people try sending packets through the
                            digipeater just because... it could be used in an emergency, but
                            there's a lot of "ifs" that need to line up to make it useful for
                            emergency use...

                            I don't think anyone was trying to belittle, but rather clarify what
                            your ultimate goal was... You are jumping through a lot of hoops to
                            get confirmation of a digipeat via the ISS when there are easier ways
                            to know you got digipeated. But, if you are up for the challenge, go
                            for it.

                            > So, tell me why I should or shouldn't be doing this and I will respect your replies.

                            You shouldn't do it if you don't have the time and money to complete
                            it, or you aren't up for the challenge. You should do it if it is
                            something that you really are interested in doing, and are able to put
                            the time and resources into the challenge.

                            Like Don said, if you are having fun, you're going the right direction!

                            --
                            James
                            VE6SRV
                          • lenkf5elb
                            James and everyone, Thank you for your replies. I do enjoy what I do. I learn a lot from what I do and and feel a sense of accomplishment when things work. I
                            Message 13 of 13 , Nov 29, 2013
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                              James and everyone,
                              Thank you for your replies. I do enjoy what I do. I learn a lot from what I do and and feel a sense of accomplishment when things work.

                              I realize I still have a lot to learn so I will be back to ask more questions. Right now I have to digest what you and Lynn have told me.

                              Thanks again and sorry for my thin skin.

                              Len KF5ELB


                              >
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