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Re: [aprsisce] Transatlantic Balloon attempt today

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  • kc8sfq@mei.net
    APRS.FI looks like it is there now, but nothing on CNSP web site. I m looking forward to see if I can track it direct. If it goes north of their transatlantic
    Message 1 of 51 , Dec 2, 2012
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      APRS.FI looks like it is there now, but nothing on CNSP web site. I'm looking forward to see if I can track it direct. If it goes north of their transatlantic shot, it might just come over here. Probably in the middle of the night.

      73 KC8SFQ
      ++++++++++++++++++++++


      > K6RPT is on the way to the launch site in California, those of you in the
      > states please try and track.
    • James Ewen
      ... It sure did! It was one of these devices. http://www.bigredbee.com/blgps_2mhp.htm It was used to observe and track the flight from California all the way
      Message 51 of 51 , Dec 5, 2012
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        On Wed, Dec 5, 2012 at 1:04 PM, joseph cooksley <skiprokiwi@...> wrote:

        > Awesome ! wonder if the rig had a beacon it to allow for possible
        > recovery ?

        It sure did! It was one of these devices.

        http://www.bigredbee.com/blgps_2mhp.htm

        It was used to observe and track the flight from California all the
        way to Morocco as seen here:

        http://aprs.fi/#!mt=roadmap&z=11&call=a%2FK6RPT-12&timerange=604800

        All one needs to do is get closer to the landing area and listen for
        the signal on 144.390. You don't even need to decode the packet to
        recover. If you hear ANY activity on 144.390 in the area, it is most
        likely the payload. Use RDF techniques to triangulate the final
        resting location. APRSISCE/32 has the ability to plot RF directionals
        and omni DF plots, which would be a great tool to use for recovery
        efforts

        If you had APRSISCE/32 connected to your radio, the program could plot
        any position packet that was successfully decoded once you got close
        enough.

        Sometimes we forget that the whole purpose of the APRS transmitter on
        board these payloads is to beacon location information which can be
        used to determine the landing location for recovery.

        That's what we use all the time to recover all our balloon payloads.

        --
        James
        VE6SRV
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