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RE: [anubiasdesign] Water Quality measurement

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  • michael@meyer.net
    Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters change after letting your water sit. In KC, our pH is very high as well. I don t worry too
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 2, 2007
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      Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters change after letting your water sit.  In KC, our pH is very high as well.  I don't worry too much about my water since I keep easier to maintain species, but I have heard that the pH does drop very quickly when you let the water sit for 24-48 hours.  I was just curious if it was a myth or truth.
      Mike
       
      -----Original Message-----
      From: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com [mailto:anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of marti.horan4
      Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 5:43 PM
      To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [anubiasdesign] Water Quality measurement

      Can someone out there help me put the following water parameter into ppm so I can match it up with my Aquarium Pharmaceuticals Freshwater Master Test Kit?

      I just got this measurement  from the Iowa City, IA Water Treatment Plant.  Believe it or not, my fish are surviving in this water.

      Nitrate:          6.8 mg/L  as N       This is at the water plant.

      Nitrate:      160 ppm   (NO3)      At my kitchen tap with the APFMT Kit.

      ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _______

      Other parameters of interest are:

      Total Alkalinity      38 mg/L     as CaCO3

      Calcium Hardness  53 mg/L    as CaCO3

      Total Hardness        113 mg/l    as CaCO3

      Nitrite                       <1 mg/L     as    N

      TDS                             146 mg/L

      pH                               9.2  ( !)

      Magnesium             approx. 60 mg/L   as CaCO3

      Carbonate Hardness     38 mg/L    as CaCO3

      How do these Hardness measurements work out in KH or GH? What is the formula? Chemistry was not my strong suit.

      I do regular partial water changes 25-30% , with gravel vacuuming, every two weeks and don't overfeed or overstock.  Just before a water change the Ammonia is zero ppm, Nitrite is zero ppm, and Nitrate is between 80 and 160 ppm, pH is 7.2  .  This is a 75 gallon with undergravel  filter, Whisper 3 filter,  lots of Java Fern and Anubias Nana, lights on 10-12 hours a day.  I do not use plant fertilizer.

      -Marti

       

      .

    • bizecology
      I would guess that it won t drop much. Most of the water that come out with a higher pH and then quickly drops is water with little buffering. In water with
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 2, 2007
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        I would guess that it won't drop much. Most of the water that come
        out with a higher pH and then quickly drops is water with little
        buffering. In water with a lot of Calcium, yougenerally don't see
        much immediate pH drop - maybe .3 units or less.


        --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, <michael@...> wrote:
        >
        > Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters
        change
        > after letting your water sit. In KC, our pH is very high as well.
        I don't
        > worry too much about my water since I keep easier to maintain
        species, but I
        > have heard that the pH does drop very quickly when you let the
        water sit for
        > 24-48 hours. I was just curious if it was a myth or truth.
        > Mike
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of marti.horan4
        > Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 5:43 PM
        > To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [anubiasdesign] Water Quality measurement
        >
        >
        >
        > Can someone out there help me put the following water parameter
        into ppm
        > so I can match it up with my Aquarium Pharmaceuticals Freshwater
        Master Test
        > Kit?
        >
        > I just got this measurement from the Iowa City, IA Water
        Treatment Plant.
        > Believe it or not, my fish are surviving in this water.
        >
        > Nitrate: 6.8 mg/L as N This is at the water plant.
        >
        > Nitrate: 160 ppm (NO3) At my kitchen tap with the
        APFMT Kit.
        >
        > _______________________________________________________
        >
        > Other parameters of interest are:
        >
        > Total Alkalinity 38 mg/L as CaCO3
        >
        > Calcium Hardness 53 mg/L as CaCO3
        >
        > Total Hardness 113 mg/l as CaCO3
        >
        > Nitrite <1 mg/L as N
        >
        > TDS 146 mg/L
        >
        > pH 9.2 ( !)
        >
        > Magnesium approx. 60 mg/L as CaCO3
        >
        > Carbonate Hardness 38 mg/L as CaCO3
        >
        > How do these Hardness measurements work out in KH or GH? What is
        the
        > formula? Chemistry was not my strong suit.
        >
        > I do regular partial water changes 25-30% , with gravel
        vacuuming, every
        > two weeks and don't overfeed or overstock. Just before a water
        change the
        > Ammonia is zero ppm, Nitrite is zero ppm, and Nitrate is between 80
        and 160
        > ppm, pH is 7.2 . This is a 75 gallon with undergravel filter,
        Whisper 3
        > filter, lots of Java Fern and Anubias Nana, lights on 10-12 hours
        a day. I
        > do not use plant fertilizer.
        >
        > -Marti
        >
        >
        > .
        >
      • marti.horan4
        Mike- I will try this and post an answer on Monday night. -Marti ... change ... don t ... species, but I ... sit for
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 2, 2007
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          Mike-
          I will try this and post an answer on Monday night.

          -Marti


          --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, <michael@...> wrote:
          >
          > Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters
          change
          > after letting your water sit. In KC, our pH is very high as well. I
          don't
          > worry too much about my water since I keep easier to maintain
          species, but I
          > have heard that the pH does drop very quickly when you let the water
          sit for
          > 24-48 hours. I was just curious if it was a myth or truth.
          > Mike
          >
          >
        • marti.horan4
          Mike- pH test at the water faucet was a little darker purple than the 8.8 maximum on the test kit, so I m guessing 9.0 After sitting at room temperature for 48
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 5, 2007
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            Mike-

            pH test at the water faucet was a little darker purple than the 8.8
            maximum on the test kit, so I'm guessing 9.0
            After sitting at room temperature for 48 hours,and open to room air,
            the pH is 7.2.

            I have been using a Python to do water changes directly from the tap.
            This may change in light of this finding....

            -Marti
            ____________________________________________________________________
            -- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, "marti.horan4" <mjhhoran@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Mike-
            > I will try this and post an answer on Monday night.
            >
            > -Marti
            >
            >
            > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, <michael@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters
            > change
            > > after letting your water sit. In KC, our pH is very high as
            well. I
            > don't
            > > worry too much about my water since I keep easier to maintain
            > species, but I
            > > have heard that the pH does drop very quickly when you let the
            water
            > sit for
            > > 24-48 hours. I was just curious if it was a myth or truth.
            > > Mike
            > >
            > >
            >
          • BRiaN Forsythe
            what would cause that? was the water room temperature when you initially tested it? this implies that there s some sort of gas in the water increasing the
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 5, 2007
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              what would cause that?  was the water room temperature when you initially tested it?  this implies that there's some sort of gas in the water increasing the pH.  i would be inclined to think that there was an issue with either the test kit or the method of testing.

              On 6/5/07, marti.horan4 <mjhhoran@...> wrote:

              Mike-

              pH test at the water faucet was a little darker purple than the 8.8
              maximum on the test kit, so I'm guessing 9.0
              After sitting at room temperature for 48 hours,and open to room air,
              the pH is 7.2.

              I have been using a Python to do water changes directly from the tap.
              This may change in light of this finding....

              -Marti
              __________________________________________________________
              -- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, "marti.horan4" <mjhhoran@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Mike-
              > I will try this and post an answer on Monday night.
              >
              > -Marti
              >
              >
              > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, <michael@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters
              > change
              > > after letting your water sit. In KC, our pH is very high as
              well. I
              > don't
              > > worry too much about my water since I keep easier to maintain
              > species, but I
              > > have heard that the pH does drop very quickly when you let the
              water
              > sit for
              > > 24-48 hours. I was just curious if it was a myth or truth.
              > > Mike
              > >
              > >
              >


            • BRiaN Forsythe
              Assuming of course that there was no precipitate? even if there is zero buffer in the water, unless there s something acidic in it, the pH shouldn t drop.
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 5, 2007
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                Assuming of course that there was no precipitate?  even if there is zero buffer in the water, unless there's something acidic in it, the pH shouldn't drop.

                On 6/5/07, BRiaN Forsythe <megasycophant@...> wrote:
                what would cause that?  was the water room temperature when you initially tested it?  this implies that there's some sort of gas in the water increasing the pH.  i would be inclined to think that there was an issue with either the test kit or the method of testing.

                On 6/5/07, marti.horan4 <mjhhoran@... > wrote:

                Mike-

                pH test at the water faucet was a little darker purple than the 8.8
                maximum on the test kit, so I'm guessing 9.0
                After sitting at room temperature for 48 hours,and open to room air,
                the pH is 7.2.

                I have been using a Python to do water changes directly from the tap.
                This may change in light of this finding....

                -Marti
                __________________________________________________________
                -- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, "marti.horan4" <mjhhoran@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Mike-
                > I will try this and post an answer on Monday night.
                >
                > -Marti
                >
                >
                > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, <michael@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters
                > change
                > > after letting your water sit. In KC, our pH is very high as
                well. I
                > don't
                > > worry too much about my water since I keep easier to maintain
                > species, but I
                > > have heard that the pH does drop very quickly when you let the
                water
                > sit for
                > > 24-48 hours. I was just curious if it was a myth or truth.
                > > Mike
                > >
                > >
                >



              • Larry Tagrin
                From what I ve seen, it s not so much a chemical increasing pH, but the lack of dissolved CO2 resulting in a false high pH level until it reaches
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 5, 2007
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                  From what I've seen, it's not so much a chemical increasing pH, but the lack of dissolved CO2 resulting in a "false high" pH level until it reaches equilibrium.  The water in the pipes is in a very unnatural situation, so the pH can change quite a bit, especially if there is little buffering in your water.  Once it sits for a while, the pH reaches equilibrium.  I fill a 30 gal barrel in my fish room with tap water, add dechlorinator, and let it sit (with a small water pump circulating the water) for at least an hour or so before using it in my tanks.  It seems to reach equilibrium very quickly.  I'll check pH later this week when i fill the container and at times thereafter to see how long it really takes.  My water is neither extremely hard nor soft (TDS 160 - 200, depending on season and weather) so it should provide a decent benchmark.

                   
                  On 6/5/07, BRiaN Forsythe <megasycophant@...> wrote:

                  what would cause that?  was the water room temperature when you initially tested it?  this implies that there's some sort of gas in the water increasing the pH.  i would be inclined to think that there was an issue with either the test kit or the method of testing.

                  On 6/5/07, marti.horan4 <mjhhoran@...> wrote:

                  Mike-

                  pH test at the water faucet was a little darker purple than the 8.8
                  maximum on the test kit, so I'm guessing 9.0
                  After sitting at room temperature for 48 hours,and open to room air,
                  the pH is 7.2.

                  I have been using a Python to do water changes directly from the tap.
                  This may change in light of this finding....

                  -Marti
                  __________________________________________________________
                  -- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, "marti.horan4" <mjhhoran@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Mike-
                  > I will try this and post an answer on Monday night.
                  >
                  > -Marti
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, <michael@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters
                  > change
                  > > after letting your water sit. In KC, our pH is very high as
                  well. I
                  > don't
                  > > worry too much about my water since I keep easier to maintain
                  > species, but I
                  > > have heard that the pH does drop very quickly when you let the
                  water
                  > sit for
                  > > 24-48 hours. I was just curious if it was a myth or truth.
                  > > Mike
                  > >
                  > >
                  >



                • BRiaN Forsythe
                  oh, i see. yeah, that makes perfect sense. guess I hadn t considered that the CO2 level would be less than the atmosphere.
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 5, 2007
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                    oh, i see. yeah, that makes perfect sense. guess I hadn't considered that the CO2 level would be less than the atmosphere.

                    On 6/5/07, Larry Tagrin < BizEcology@...> wrote:

                    From what I've seen, it's not so much a chemical increasing pH, but the lack of dissolved CO2 resulting in a "false high" pH level until it reaches equilibrium.  The water in the pipes is in a very unnatural situation, so the pH can change quite a bit, especially if there is little buffering in your water.  Once it sits for a while, the pH reaches equilibrium.  I fill a 30 gal barrel in my fish room with tap water, add dechlorinator, and let it sit (with a small water pump circulating the water) for at least an hour or so before using it in my tanks.  It seems to reach equilibrium very quickly.  I'll check pH later this week when i fill the container and at times thereafter to see how long it really takes.  My water is neither extremely hard nor soft (TDS 160 - 200, depending on season and weather) so it should provide a decent benchmark.

                     
                    On 6/5/07, BRiaN Forsythe < megasycophant@...> wrote:

                    what would cause that?  was the water room temperature when you initially tested it?  this implies that there's some sort of gas in the water increasing the pH.  i would be inclined to think that there was an issue with either the test kit or the method of testing.

                    On 6/5/07, marti.horan4 <mjhhoran@... > wrote:

                    Mike-

                    pH test at the water faucet was a little darker purple than the 8.8
                    maximum on the test kit, so I'm guessing 9.0
                    After sitting at room temperature for 48 hours,and open to room air,
                    the pH is 7.2.

                    I have been using a Python to do water changes directly from the tap.
                    This may change in light of this finding....

                    -Marti
                    __________________________________________________________
                    -- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, "marti.horan4" <mjhhoran@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Mike-
                    > I will try this and post an answer on Monday night.
                    >
                    > -Marti
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, <michael@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters
                    > change
                    > > after letting your water sit. In KC, our pH is very high as
                    well. I
                    > don't
                    > > worry too much about my water since I keep easier to maintain
                    > species, but I
                    > > have heard that the pH does drop very quickly when you let the
                    water
                    > sit for
                    > > 24-48 hours. I was just curious if it was a myth or truth.
                    > > Mike
                    > >
                    > >
                    >




                  • Gerald Griffin
                    Carbon Dioxide in the water will do that, it does it at my place. BRiaN Forsythe wrote: what would cause that? was the
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 5, 2007
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                      Carbon Dioxide in the water will do that, it does it at my place.

                      BRiaN Forsythe <megasycophant@...> wrote:
                      what would cause that?  was the water room temperature when you initially tested it?  this implies that there's some sort of gas in the water increasing the pH.  i would be inclined to think that there was an issue with either the test kit or the method of testing.

                      On 6/5/07, marti.horan4 <mjhhoran@msn. com> wrote:
                      Mike-

                      pH test at the water faucet was a little darker purple than the 8.8
                      maximum on the test kit, so I'm guessing 9.0
                      After sitting at room temperature for 48 hours,and open to room air,
                      the pH is 7.2.

                      I have been using a Python to do water changes directly from the tap.
                      This may change in light of this finding....

                      -Marti
                      ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                      -- In anubiasdesign@ yahoogroups. com, "marti.horan4" <mjhhoran@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > Mike-
                      > I will try this and post an answer on Monday night.
                      >
                      > -Marti
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In anubiasdesign@ yahoogroups. com, <michael@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters
                      > change
                      > > after letting your water sit. In KC, our pH is very high as
                      well. I
                      > don't
                      > > worry too much about my water since I keep easier to maintain
                      > species, but I
                      > > have heard that the pH does drop very quickly when you let the
                      water
                      > sit for
                      > > 24-48 hours. I was just curious if it was a myth or truth.
                      > > Mike
                      > >
                      > >
                      >




                      Boardwalk for $500? In 2007? Ha!
                      Play Monopoly Here and Now (it's updated for today's economy) at Yahoo! Games.

                    • Gerald Griffin
                      The kit could be bad. There could be something that was added to bump the pH up. When I first read this I read it wrong. BRiaN Forsythe
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jun 5, 2007
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                        The kit could be bad.  There could be something that was added to bump the pH up.  When I first read this I read it wrong.

                        BRiaN Forsythe <megasycophant@...> wrote:
                        Assuming of course that there was no precipitate?  even if there is zero buffer in the water, unless there's something acidic in it, the pH shouldn't drop.

                        On 6/5/07, BRiaN Forsythe <megasycophant@ gmail.com> wrote:
                        what would cause that?  was the water room temperature when you initially tested it?  this implies that there's some sort of gas in the water increasing the pH.  i would be inclined to think that there was an issue with either the test kit or the method of testing.

                        On 6/5/07, marti.horan4 <mjhhoran@msn. com > wrote:
                        Mike-

                        pH test at the water faucet was a little darker purple than the 8.8
                        maximum on the test kit, so I'm guessing 9.0
                        After sitting at room temperature for 48 hours,and open to room air,
                        the pH is 7.2.

                        I have been using a Python to do water changes directly from the tap.
                        This may change in light of this finding....

                        -Marti
                        ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                        -- In anubiasdesign@ yahoogroups. com, "marti.horan4" <mjhhoran@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > Mike-
                        > I will try this and post an answer on Monday night.
                        >
                        > -Marti
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In anubiasdesign@ yahoogroups. com, <michael@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Marty, I would be curious to see if any of your water parameters
                        > change
                        > > after letting your water sit. In KC, our pH is very high as
                        well. I
                        > don't
                        > > worry too much about my water since I keep easier to maintain
                        > species, but I
                        > > have heard that the pH does drop very quickly when you let the
                        water
                        > sit for
                        > > 24-48 hours. I was just curious if it was a myth or truth.
                        > > Mike
                        > >
                        > >
                        >





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