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Re: Something different - tank heavily colonized by planaria?

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  • the_valeyard
    Some Planaria will hunt and kill shrimp, and are the bane of shrimp breeders. If your tanks are small and not planted, I ve had good luck sucking them out
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 27, 2013
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      Some Planaria will hunt and kill shrimp, and are the bane of shrimp breeders.

      If your tanks are small and not planted, I've had good luck sucking them out using an airhose. Normally once a week I'd put some food in that they like, turn out the lights, and then 30 min later come back and suck up all I could see. I've eradicated them completely from 3 tanks that way.

      Planted or heavily decorated tanks are another matter.

      You can use flubendazole, fenbendazole, or a product called No Planaria (made from Betel nuts) to kill them. Be warned, these products will also kill Nerite snails, and leave a residue in the tank for weeks after treatment. Most other snails are fine, and the medications are shrimp safe as well as fish safe.

      --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, Jim Rake <JimR61475@...> wrote:
      >
      > As a diversion from the recent discussion of introduced species, I have just discovered that one of my tanks is swarming with planaria - those non-parasitic free-living flatworms you might recall from high school biology class.
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      > I am not sure how long they have been present (more on that shortly). I discovered them only because I was doing some maintenance work on that particular bank of tanks in my fish room 'after dark'; when I shined a hand lamp into the tank, it was swarming with flatworms gliding ove every surface. None of the other tanks showed any signs of a similar infestation, and sure enough, when the lights are in their 'on' cycle, there is no sign of the worms in the effected tank. Since their detection was accidental, I have no idea how long they have been present.
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      > Although these are morphologically identical to the planaria familiar to biology students, they clearly are a separate species, since they are completely unpigmented (the biologist's favorites are brown: http://www.carolina.com/platyhelminthes/planaria-living/).
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      > This tank holds a trio of Apistogramma cacatuoides, three Parotocinclas coccama, and a clown pleco. It is quite evident that none of these species considers the planaria to be edible.
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      > So, 1) is this a cause for concern? 2) does anything eat these? 3) If I want to rid the tank of the worms, is there anything short of moving the stock, and sterilizing the tank with hypochlorite that I can do?
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      > JIm R.
      >
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