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Re: [anubiasdesign] Something different - tank heavily colonized by planaria?

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  • Gerald Griffin
    I would keep them  a colony and use them in my Biology classes. Maybe even Zoology   We are proud to announce the formation of the American Labyrinth Fish
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 26, 2013
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      I would keep them  a colony and use them in my Biology classes.

      Maybe even Zoology
       
      We are proud to announce the formation of the American Labyrinth Fish
      Association (ALFA). We are starting out as a Yahoo Group with plans for a website and magazine. Please join us as we endeavor to learn more about these fascinating fish.
      http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/AmericanLabyrinthFishAssociation/


      From: Julie <juliechristie@...>
      To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:20 AM
      Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Something different - tank heavily colonized by planaria?

       
      Gerald, do tell!  What would you do with them?
       
      I have 1 or 2 tanks that have some in them, not too bad out of the whole plethora of tanks I have.  Odd that they are only in the pleco tanks, possibly they like the lower pH as compared to the higher pH of my african tanks?  And of course the fact that I overfeed my plecos... ;)
       
      Julie


    • Jim Rake
      None taken - and a timely reminder that when I am sending a potentially snarky reply to folks who are not familiar with my style - use winky emoticons ( ;-)
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 26, 2013
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        None taken - and a timely reminder that when I am sending a potentially snarky reply to folks who are not familiar with my style - use 'winky' emoticons (  ;-)    ).

        But seriously,  given the high degree of sophistication in this group (and which-ever side of he discussion you are on, the 'invasive species' discussion of the last few days was SOPHISTICATED), I would prefer that the default assumption is that a question posed is from a competent source.  I know that with the nature of the web, there is a non-zero probability that the next query to this group will come from some knowledge-zero moroon who is on his (or hers) fifth doomed goldfish from the local Traget store), but I hope that she/he will be in the minority.

        Jim R


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Batfish Aquatics <batfishaquatics@...>
        To: anubiasdesign <anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tue, Mar 26, 2013 9:47 am
        Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Something different - tank heavily colonized by planaria?



        Hello Jim.

        I am sorry if my previous email may have seemed a little offensive.  I certainly did not intend it that way.  Without knowing your set up, experience level, or even what fish were in the  tank, I simply proposed the most likely causes, and did not intend to imply you neglect your tank!:)

        After reading your response, it doesn't sound to me as though you are either overstocked or overfeeding (though the algae tabs could be a problem if they're not being eaten quickly). Ultimately, something is feeding those planaria, and once you figure out the source, you will eliminate the pests. 

        J. 

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Mar 25, 2013, at 8:37 PM, Jim Rake <JimR61475@...> wrote:

         
        Ummm ... trying hard not to take umbrage here ...

        1) The tank is a 10 gallon, with a 'Hamburg mattenfilter' which spans the narrow dimension of the tank.  I haven't used an undergravel fileter in 35 years (admittably, I didn't have fish for 33 of those years, but that is another story ...).

        2)  The tank (like its mates in the rack) is given a ~90% water exchange on a ~ bi-weekly schedule.  I have the luxury of having soft/acid well water, and I use a 55 gallon poly drum to aerate/temperature adjust/temper enough water for the exchanges.  When I do an exchange, I siphon all of the 'gelbstoff' from the area immediately behind, and the corresponding area of gravel immediately in front of the filter foam.

        3)  Water parameters, even at the limit between exchanges, never exceeds 10 ppm nitrate/0 ppm nitrite.

        4) Feeding is exclusively live food:  daphnia (until my cultures crashed during a blistering heat wave last summer), brine shrimp nauplii, mixed Grindal and white worms.  Th only exception to this is a single 'Omega One Veggie Round' every 2-3 days to give the Ottos and Plecos something to chew on.

        5)  Half a dozen other tanks which have exactly the same care regimen show no sign of planaria, or anything else diagnostic of neglect.

        Jim



        -----Original Message-----
        From: Batfish Aquatics <batfishaquatics@...>
        To: anubiasdesign <anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sun, Mar 24, 2013 6:17 pm
        Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Something different - tank heavily colonized by planaria?



        1.   Yes.  The planaria themselves are unlikely to be a problem, however, they're there for a reason, and symptomatic of an underlying problem.  They have to be eating SOMETHING, and the most likely food source is excess fish food.  In other words, they're a sign that you're either overfeeding, or have another source of detritus, or have too many fish (what size is the tank?   You have 7 fish, none of which are particularly big).   
        As another possibility, they can be a sign of poor tank maintenance, particularly if you have an UGF that hasn't been maintained properly, or are just not gravel vacuuming when you do the water changes.  

        2.   Yes.  But not much, and that won't solve the problem. :) 

        3.  Cut back on feeding and manually remove them by gravel vacuuming.  You can also try baiting them and removing them.   

        You'll never eradicate them, but you will reduce them.  You can then try something like flubendazole to get rid of the last ones.   Or just live with a small infestation. :) 

         




        On Sun, Mar 24, 2013 at 6:11 PM, Jim Rake <JimR61475@...> wrote:
         
        As a diversion from the recent discussion of introduced species, I have just discovered that one of my tanks is swarming with planaria - those non-parasitic free-living flatworms you might recall from high school biology class.  

        I am not sure how long they have been present (more on that shortly).  I discovered them only because I was doing some maintenance work on that particular bank of tanks in my fish room 'after dark'; when I shined a hand lamp into the tank, it was swarming with flatworms gliding ove every surface.  None of the other tanks showed any signs of a similar infestation, and sure enough, when the lights are in their 'on' cycle, there is no sign of the worms in the effected tank. Since their detection was accidental, I have no idea how long they have been present.

        Although these are morphologically identical to the planaria familiar to biology students, they clearly are a separate species, since they are completely unpigmented (the biologist's favorites are brown:  http://www.carolina.com/platyhelminthes/planaria-living/).

        This tank holds a trio of Apistogramma cacatuoides, three Parotocinclas coccama, and a clown pleco.  It is quite evident that none of these species considers the planaria to be edible.  

        So, 1) is this a cause for concern?  2)  does anything eat these?  3)  If I want to rid the tank of the worms, is there anything short of moving the stock, and sterilizing the tank with hypochlorite that I can do?

        JIm R.





      • the_valeyard
        Some Planaria will hunt and kill shrimp, and are the bane of shrimp breeders. If your tanks are small and not planted, I ve had good luck sucking them out
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 27, 2013
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          Some Planaria will hunt and kill shrimp, and are the bane of shrimp breeders.

          If your tanks are small and not planted, I've had good luck sucking them out using an airhose. Normally once a week I'd put some food in that they like, turn out the lights, and then 30 min later come back and suck up all I could see. I've eradicated them completely from 3 tanks that way.

          Planted or heavily decorated tanks are another matter.

          You can use flubendazole, fenbendazole, or a product called No Planaria (made from Betel nuts) to kill them. Be warned, these products will also kill Nerite snails, and leave a residue in the tank for weeks after treatment. Most other snails are fine, and the medications are shrimp safe as well as fish safe.

          --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, Jim Rake <JimR61475@...> wrote:
          >
          > As a diversion from the recent discussion of introduced species, I have just discovered that one of my tanks is swarming with planaria - those non-parasitic free-living flatworms you might recall from high school biology class.
          >
          >
          > I am not sure how long they have been present (more on that shortly). I discovered them only because I was doing some maintenance work on that particular bank of tanks in my fish room 'after dark'; when I shined a hand lamp into the tank, it was swarming with flatworms gliding ove every surface. None of the other tanks showed any signs of a similar infestation, and sure enough, when the lights are in their 'on' cycle, there is no sign of the worms in the effected tank. Since their detection was accidental, I have no idea how long they have been present.
          >
          >
          > Although these are morphologically identical to the planaria familiar to biology students, they clearly are a separate species, since they are completely unpigmented (the biologist's favorites are brown: http://www.carolina.com/platyhelminthes/planaria-living/).
          >
          >
          > This tank holds a trio of Apistogramma cacatuoides, three Parotocinclas coccama, and a clown pleco. It is quite evident that none of these species considers the planaria to be edible.
          >
          >
          > So, 1) is this a cause for concern? 2) does anything eat these? 3) If I want to rid the tank of the worms, is there anything short of moving the stock, and sterilizing the tank with hypochlorite that I can do?
          >
          >
          > JIm R.
          >
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