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Re: Brazil Damns

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  • galaxie_pete
    Sad but also true. The impact of losing the Amazon to deforestation and Damns will in the end have a truly significant impact on the globe. We don t know what
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 16, 2013
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      Sad but also true. The impact of losing the Amazon to deforestation and Damns will in the end have a truly significant impact on the globe. We don't know what is being destroyed. That might be the most sad part of this.

      --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, "rdebon55" <rdebon@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Unfortunately the main exports from Brazil are not Ornamental Fish, they are as per the World Bank and to quote www.tradingeconomics.com, the following, "Brazil is the world's second largest exporter of soybean, is responsible for 80 percent of the planet's orange juice and accounts for 35 percent of global exports of raw cane and refined sugar. Other exports include: iron ores and concentrates (16 percent of total exports), oil (8 percent), meat (4 percent), coffee (2 percent), clothing and cars", and they don't even mention Timber. In fact as far as I can see the entire Ornamental Fish Industry is a microscopic blip on the chart of the percentage of GDP for Brazil. No wonder they are building DAMS like crazy, the country needs electricity and lots of it to support their energy intensive industries. Brazil has the same problem that all developing countries have, except on a larger scale, How do they grow their economy to support their growing population? Unfortunately they do not feel at this time they have the luxury or perhaps the desire to place environmental issues above their economic concerns. This may change, but for the foreseeable future the environment is going to suffer and Brazilian fauna, ornamental fish included, will be harder to find; and by the way, as a keeper of Asian fish I can tell you Myanmar, New Guinea and Borneo will not be far behind.
      > Bob DeBonis
      >
      > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, Joshua Wiegert <joshuawiegert@> wrote:
      > >
      > > It is sad and dam ironic (sorry...), Brazil pass some of the most forward thinking and restrictive export laws in the world, in order to protect their natural resources and the aquarium fish which they believed to be exploited. Brazil said that they valued the fishes living in these waters so much that they were willing to effectively destroy a not insignificant portion of their economy to protect them, killing the (legal) fish collecting and exporting business in brazil and driving collectors to other countries and regions (Myanmar and Peru thank you).
      > >
      > > Yet, ten years later, they want to destroy the habitat they sacrificed this all to preserve.
      > >
      > > Go figure.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Sent from my iPhone
      > >
      > > On Feb 15, 2013, at 16:01, "galaxie_pete" <galaxie_pete@> wrote:
      > >
      > > > I know this topic has come up many times as it impacted the hobby. And I have read a snippet here and there. But I just listened to the story on NPR about what Brazil is doing - just stunning. I didn't realize just how incredible their plans were. 168 new damns going up in the Amazon alone in the next decade. 34 sizable damns by 2021.
      > > >
      > > > The Jirau hydroelectric dam going up on the Amazon River's largest tributary, the Madeira River, is massive. It contains 50 bus sized turbines (most in the world) and it is the 3rd largest damn in Brazil 14th largest in the world.
      > > >
      > > > The ecological effects must be just shattering. It will certainly affect the future of the world not just our hobby...
      > > >
      > > > The whole article is here.
      > > > http://www.npr.org/2013/02/13/171902544/hungry-for-energy-brazil-builds-monster-dams-in-the-amazon
      > > >
      > > > PEte
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Robert DeBonis
      You are absolutely correct. Scientists estimate that the insects, animals and plants of the Amazon, Borneo and New Guinea Rainforest s contain substances that
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 16, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
         
        You are absolutely correct. Scientists estimate that the insects, animals and plants of the Amazon, Borneo and New Guinea Rainforest's
        contain substances that would cure most of the world's medical ills. Unfortunately we may never see them.
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, February 16, 2013 3:53 PM
        Subject: [anubiasdesign] Re: Brazil Damns

         

        Sad but also true. The impact of losing the Amazon to deforestation and Damns will in the end have a truly significant impact on the globe. We don't know what is being destroyed. That might be the most sad part of this.

        --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, "rdebon55" wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Unfortunately the main exports from Brazil are not Ornamental Fish, they are as per the World Bank and to quote www.tradingeconomics.com, the following, "Brazil is the world's second largest exporter of soybean, is responsible for 80 percent of the planet's orange juice and accounts for 35 percent of global exports of raw cane and refined sugar. Other exports include: iron ores and concentrates (16 percent of total exports), oil (8 percent), meat (4 percent), coffee (2 percent), clothing and cars", and they don't even mention Timber. In fact as far as I can see the entire Ornamental Fish Industry is a microscopic blip on the chart of the percentage of GDP for Brazil. No wonder they are building DAMS like crazy, the country needs electricity and lots of it to support their energy intensive industries. Brazil has the same problem that all developing countries have, except on a larger scale, How do they grow their economy to support their growing population? Unfortunately they do not feel at this time they have the luxury or perhaps the desire to place environmental issues above their economic concerns. This may change, but for the foreseeable future the environment is going to suffer and Brazilian fauna, ornamental fish included, will be harder to find; and by the way, as a keeper of Asian fish I can tell you Myanmar, New Guinea and Borneo will not be far behind.
        > Bob DeBonis
        >
        > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, Joshua Wiegert wrote:
        > >
        > > It is sad and dam ironic (sorry...), Brazil pass some of the most forward thinking and restrictive export laws in the world, in order to protect their natural resources and the aquarium fish which they believed to be exploited. Brazil said that they valued the fishes living in these waters so much that they were willing to effectively destroy a not insignificant portion of their economy to protect them, killing the (legal) fish collecting and exporting business in brazil and driving collectors to other countries and regions (Myanmar and Peru thank you).
        > >
        > > Yet, ten years later, they want to destroy the habitat they sacrificed this all to preserve.
        > >
        > > Go figure.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Sent from my iPhone
        > >
        > > On Feb 15, 2013, at 16:01, "galaxie_pete" wrote:
        > >
        > > > I know this topic has come up many times as it impacted the hobby. And I have read a snippet here and there. But I just listened to the story on NPR about what Brazil is doing - just stunning. I didn't realize just how incredible their plans were. 168 new damns going up in the Amazon alone in the next decade. 34 sizable damns by 2021.
        > > >
        > > > The Jirau hydroelectric dam going up on the Amazon River's largest tributary, the Madeira River, is massive. It contains 50 bus sized turbines (most in the world) and it is the 3rd largest damn in Brazil 14th largest in the world.
        > > >
        > > > The ecological effects must be just shattering. It will certainly affect the future of the world not just our hobby...
        > > >
        > > > The whole article is here.
        > > > http://www.npr.org/2013/02/13/171902544/hungry-for-energy-brazil-builds-monster-dams-in-the-amazon
        > > >
        > > > PEte
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >

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