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Re: [anubiasdesign] Early dwarf gourami deaths

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  • Jess
    I work at a store/wholesaler with dwarf gouramis guaranteed dgd free from the exporter, who does regular testing on their stock. I ve never seen a case in
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 29, 2012

      I work at a store/wholesaler with dwarf gouramis guaranteed dgd free from the exporter, who does regular testing on their stock. I've never seen a case in person because of this, but I know it is incredibly prevalent from other sources.

      Otherwise, I understand that dgd only affects T. Lalia - honey dwarfs and thicklips, including the hybrids typically seen, and sphaerichthys species, by all reports, are unable to contract that particular illness. I definitely can't support or refute this from our store, since we do not import any fish that could potentially have the disease.

      Nonetheless, in my experience, sphaerichthys tend to be comparatively fragile and prone to external parasites. They often die on us unexpectedly or get horrible ich/velvet. C. Nobilis is known as the fragile gourami due to its sensitivity, but we actually have less problems with them.
      As for honeys, I do know that we lose a few upon importation on occasion, but compared to all the other 3" or less gouramis, they are incredibly bullet proof. I've kept chuna for several years and have only lost one due to old age.
      On the other hand, I had two thicklip males waste away into oblivion. Don't know the cause but am always terrified of tb.

      Though, all things considered, we quarantine extensively and Medicate as necessary before selling any fish retail or wholesale. This may explain some of our success rate.

      On Dec 29, 2012 5:16 PM, "Dave Lee" <dave020656@...> wrote:
       

      Research Dwarf Gourami Disease. You might find your answer there.

      From: Tyler M <industrialnightmare@...>
      To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2012 12:02 AM
      Subject: [anubiasdesign] Early dwarf gourami deaths
       
      I have been baffled for a while about why dwarf gouramis seem to always die within a year. Personally, I've tried keeping Ctenops nobilis who I received in immaculate condition with the same results. Customers at the pet store I work at notice the same thing with their dwarf gouramis and I've noticed that the female honey and sunset gouramis that end up not selling seldom last more than a few months as well. One of my coworkers suggest perhaps the diet they get isn't right and they die of deficiencies. Disease such as velvet should be ruled out, as all the gouramis have been treated for various bacterial infections and given full regimens of quinine and malachite green upon arrival. If it helps these gouamis are usually feed flake food and live baby brine shrimp in the store, and customers normally feed the fish brine shrimp/bloodworms and flake food.

      Has anybody here had experience keeping these gouramis long term?

    • Dave Lee
      Signs of TB are pink, or white lesions on fish that grow larger with time. Also crooking of the spine. ________________________________ From: Jeremy Basch
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 29, 2012
        Signs of TB are pink, or white lesions on fish that grow larger with time. Also crooking of the spine.

        From: Jeremy Basch <jeremybasch@...>
        To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2012 9:03 AM
        Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Early dwarf gourami deaths
         
        Many have been found to carry TB. Mike Hellweg was first to share this information. Someone who works with Anabantoides more than I can probably share more insight.
        On Dec 29, 2012 7:02 AM, "Tyler M" <industrialnightmare@...> wrote:
         
        I have been baffled for a while about why dwarf gouramis seem to always die within a year. Personally, I've tried keeping Ctenops nobilis who I received in immaculate condition with the same results. Customers at the pet store I work at notice the same thing with their dwarf gouramis and I've noticed that the female honey and sunset gouramis that end up not selling seldom last more than a few months as well. One of my coworkers suggest perhaps the diet they get isn't right and they die of deficiencies. Disease such as velvet should be ruled out, as all the gouramis have been treated for various bacterial infections and given full regimens of quinine and malachite green upon arrival. If it helps these gouamis are usually feed flake food and live baby brine shrimp in the store, and customers normally feed the fish brine shrimp/bloodworms and flake food.

        Has anybody here had experience keeping these gouramis long term?

      • Gerald
        Besides raw sores on the head/body and spinal deformity, other symptoms of Mycobacterium infection ( Fish TB ) can include jaw deformity and deterioration,
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 2, 2013
          Besides raw sores on the head/body and spinal deformity, other symptoms of Mycobacterium infection ("Fish TB") can include jaw deformity and deterioration, bloating or wasting, loss of fin control (often the pectoral fin), and loss of pigment control (lightening or darkening on part of the body). Mycobacterium can infect ALL fish, but dwarf gouramis, rainbowfish, and certain soft-water cichlids (rams, angels, apistos, pelvicachromis) are especially prone to it. It is NOT the same disease as "Dwarf Gourami Disease" (virus) which seems to only infect dwarf gouramis (so far). There is no effective treatment against either of these diseases, so unfortunately you cannot "rule out" disease by treating fish with a broad range of meds.


          --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, Dave Lee <dave020656@...> wrote:
          >
          > Signs of TB are pink, or white lesions on fish that grow larger with time. Also crooking of the spine.
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Jeremy Basch <jeremybasch@...>
          > To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2012 9:03 AM
          > Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Early dwarf gourami deaths
          >
          >
          >  
          >
          > Many have been found to carry TB. Mike Hellweg was first to share this information. Someone who works with Anabantoides more than I can probably share more insight.
          > On Dec 29, 2012 7:02 AM, "Tyler M" <industrialnightmare@...> wrote:
          >
          > > 
          > >I have been baffled for a while about why dwarf gouramis seem to always die within a year. Personally, I've tried keeping Ctenops nobilis who I received in immaculate condition with the same results. Customers at the pet store I work at notice the same thing with their dwarf gouramis and I've noticed that the female honey and sunset gouramis that end up not selling seldom last more than a few months as well. One of my coworkers suggest perhaps the diet they get isn't right and they die of deficiencies. Disease such as velvet should be ruled out, as all the gouramis have been treated for various bacterial infections and given full regimens of quinine and malachite green upon arrival. If it helps these gouamis are usually feed flake food and live baby brine shrimp in the store, and customers normally feed the fish brine shrimp/bloodworms and flake food.
          > >
          > >Has anybody here had experience keeping these gouramis long term?
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Colin
          The Dwarf Gourami iridovirus, noted in 1993 after some mass deaths in Florida fish farms the previous year, seems to be specific to Trichogaster species. A
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 13, 2013
            The Dwarf Gourami iridovirus, noted in 1993 after some mass deaths in Florida fish farms the previous year, seems to be specific to Trichogaster species. A 2003 Australian test found the virus in 22% of the fish inspected. Check "Dwarf Gourami iridovirus" at GoogleScholar.

            --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald" wrote:
            >
            > Besides raw sores on the head/body and spinal deformity, other symptoms of Mycobacterium infection ("Fish TB") can include jaw deformity and deterioration, bloating or wasting, loss of fin control (often the pectoral fin), and loss of pigment control (lightening or darkening on part of the body). Mycobacterium can infect ALL fish, but dwarf gouramis, rainbowfish, and certain soft-water cichlids (rams, angels, apistos, pelvicachromis) are especially prone to it. It is NOT the same disease as "Dwarf Gourami Disease" (virus) which seems to only infect dwarf gouramis (so far). There is no effective treatment against either of these diseases, so unfortunately you cannot "rule out" disease by treating fish with a broad range of meds.
            >
            >
            > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, Dave Lee wrote:
            > >
            > > Signs of TB are pink, or white lesions on fish that grow larger with time. Also crooking of the spine.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ________________________________
            > > From: Jeremy Basch
            > > To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
            > > Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2012 9:03 AM
            > > Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Early dwarf gourami deaths
            > >
            > >
            > >  
            > >
            > > Many have been found to carry TB. Mike Hellweg was first to share this information. Someone who works with Anabantoides more than I can probably share more insight.
            > > On Dec 29, 2012 7:02 AM, "Tyler M" wrote:
            > >
            > > > 
            > > >I have been baffled for a while about why dwarf gouramis seem to always die within a year. Personally, I've tried keeping Ctenops nobilis who I received in immaculate condition with the same results. Customers at the pet store I work at notice the same thing with their dwarf gouramis and I've noticed that the female honey and sunset gouramis that end up not selling seldom last more than a few months as well. One of my coworkers suggest perhaps the diet they get isn't right and they die of deficiencies. Disease such as velvet should be ruled out, as all the gouramis have been treated for various bacterial infections and given full regimens of quinine and malachite green upon arrival. If it helps these gouamis are usually feed flake food and live baby brine shrimp in the store, and customers normally feed the fish brine shrimp/bloodworms and flake food.
            > > >
            > > >Has anybody here had experience keeping these gouramis long term?
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
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