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Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

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  • Bill
    I think it was the submissions to an international competition.. Bill ________________________________ From: Brandon Smith To:
    Message 1 of 67 , Apr 30, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      I think it was the submissions to an international competition.. Bill 


      From: Brandon Smith <bsmith717@...>
      To: "anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com" <anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sat, April 30, 2011 11:37:19 PM
      Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

       

      Which aquascapes? I have plenty of places to send you to feast your eyes on whatever scape you desire? I don't however have any recollection to the lightbulb scape though. 

      Drive safe,

      Brandon Smith
      Jim Butler KIA 
      636-256-9600

      On Apr 30, 2011, at 9:52 PM, Bill <williemcd@...> wrote:

       

      Brandon... glad you took it in the manner it was intended... Do YOU know that site that features all those incredible aquascapes?... Lissette has just got to see it!  Bill in Va. 


      From: Brandon Smith <bsmith717@...>
      To: "anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com" <anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com>
      Cc: "anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com" <anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sat, April 30, 2011 10:45:39 PM
      Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

       

      I would have to agree with you on that. I was at work today and didnt get a chance to read every response here so  I may have missed your point, or perhaps there were a few points. 

      It is my opinion (and anyone I know in the planted tank/aqua scaping community) that a tank certainly need not be high tech at all to be considered a "proper scape". I have a very low tech mini-m that is scaped with a piece if driftwood and a bunch or rarer crypts. No co2, no ferts (I do micros once a week) and it's lit by a wal mart desk lamp with a 13w spiral cfl. 

      Drive safe,

      Brandon Smith
      Jim Butler KIA 
      636-256-9600

      On Apr 30, 2011, at 8:41 PM, Lissette <lljdma06@...> wrote:

       

      My quibble is with the word aquascape or scape being associated primarily with a CO2 setup, fert dosed tank. A tank can be "scaped" & not have demanding plants. It's still a planted tank proper. Or is this not the case? 

      "If it's Baroque...don't fix it."


      On Apr 30, 2011, at 21:32, Brandon Smith <bsmith717@...> wrote:

       

      If ANYONE has a tank with more demanding plants (limnophilias, Ludwigias, etc) and does not dose co2 or water column ferts is certainly the exception not the rule. Also, just because you aren't dosing ferts to the water does not mean the plants aren't getting from somewhere like the substrate or if using tap water from there. 

      Eventually with highlight, co2 injected and water column dosed tank if demand for one of the the three is not met as was stated two posts below (by the man with the magnificent 180 said, bad things will happen. 

      Drive safe,

      Brandon Smith
      Jim Butler KIA 
      636-256-9600

      On Apr 30, 2011, at 7:04 PM, Lissette <lljdma06@...> wrote:

       

      I don't agree with you. You CAN have an aquascaped  tank senza CO2 & ferts. 

      Will post pictures when I'm done packing for my trip. Going go sing in West Virginia & then in NYC. I'm a classically trained contralto that indulges in planted tanks. 

      "If it's Baroque...don't fix it."


      On Apr 30, 2011, at 19:56, "David Williams" <ingg1196@...> wrote:

       

      Bill – I’m with you, and constantly fight micro-managing my tanks… and I don’t dose much in the way of ferts… but there are limitations to that.

       

      I’m going to share with the group probably the highest compliment I feel I have ever gotten, hopefully to show you what I mean.

       

      While setting up a tank for competition, I had the pleasure of having Neil Frank visit my home. Those who are involved in the planted tank hobby will probably know his name. We (we being GWAPA) were showing him the mineralized soil methods that several GWAPA members use (not far off from your topsoil, just sort of treated and preloaded for longer lasting ferts.) This is a high light tank, and injects CO2, but does almost no dosing – ferts come from the soil by and large

       

      His comment was along the lines of… “Holy cow, Diana needs to see THIS.” Three guesses which Diana he referred to. I’d been learning a lot from fellow hobbyists through GWAPA, most of whom remain far above my skill level, and was simply so proud that the effort had paid off. And still am.

       

      It isn’t set in a scape as of now, 180g are not fun to constantly keep tip top, but here are shots of the last couple setups:

       

      http://www.aac.acuavida.com/gallery/1146-2/180g_202009_20final.jpg

       

      http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/aquarium-pictures/showimage.php?i=5526&original=1&c=member&imageuser=6784

       

      The second shot being what Neil saw.

       

      Point being - There is a difference between plants in a tank and an aquascaped tank. I’m not saying your way can’t work to keep plants in a tank – I’m saying for a scaped tank, a higher tech tank, it just plain doesn’t work without CO2 and a plan for keeping the plants able to find and feed on ferts (unless specifically set for just Anubias and crypts sorta thing). That 180g of mine has 12x39 T5HO’s over it, in TEK fixtures. Turn them on for a month sans CO2, bad things happen. J Don’t turn them on, you don’t get the growth, the color, and half the plants in those scapes die.

       

      The tank Neil saw, by the by, cannot grow Eriocaulums for the record - no Blyxas or Toninas either…. Limitation of not dosing a water column. Some of the things folks want to do simply cannot be done “naturally” in a small cube of water.

       

      I can grow sags and vals without a light. Just a little something of sunlight through a window. I can keep Anubias alive in a closet in a Tupperware container for months….but I couldn’t have done the scapes above without CO2, a method for ferts, etc. Make sense?

       

       

      From: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com [mailto:anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill
      Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 1:01 PM
      To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

       

       

      Well.I've found Diana's methods work well for me.  I start with baked topsoil, covered with about 1.5 inches of pool filter sand.  I'm growing sags, crypts, vals, and a number of fineleafed plants.  Combined with a dozen larger angels, 3  3" discus, 10-12 assorted tets, 4 cory's and 2 plecos.. in a 125.  No ferts, no CO2.  My ammonia and Nitrites are zero, my nitrate will occassionaly spike to 5 in which case I'll siphon off about 5g to clean up some poop. I have a sizable HOB just stuffed with floss to host the bacteria and to provide a bit of water movement.  At the other end I use a bass-wood airstone to ensure there are no dead zones.  

      I could be and am probably wrong but I feel that some folks just like messing with their tanks too much and tend to micro-manage.  I know I'll not convert any of these types but hopefully someone new to the hobby will consider a more natural approach in addition to the typical "hands-on" method.  Bill in Va. 

       


      From: David Williams <ingg1196@...>
      To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sat, April 30, 2011 10:28:03 AM
      Subject: RE: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

       

      Yes, Bill, good read, but please do actually understand Diana’s methods. A baseline is emersed growth, packed to the gills with plants tanks, with very light bioloads. It does in some respects try to mimic nature.

       

      Know what happens in nature? You get an incredibly efficient induction of CO2 via emersed growth, incredibly light bioloads in comparison to what we do, filtration way more than what we do, and this is before we consider that most of the plants we keep are marginal marsh plants who immediately get up and out of the water given the option. J

       

      Diana, while I respect her work, does not show methodology that comes close to some of the modern capabilities, nor the needs of some of the more finicky plants out there,  and their respective abilities/requirements. It isn’t hard to pack a tank with Anubias and some narrow leaf ludwigia and let it grow out low tech. Try doing it with Eriocaulums. J Little different result, and if you aren’t balancing your tank, you won’t keep them long….

       

      So the reality is, if you want to “mimic” nature and still have all growth submersed, scaped, and grown in density, you are going to be using CO2, and finding a method of introducing macros. BTW – ever fertilized your lawn? Why not just do it “nature’s” way, fields of grass in nature…. But not like your lawn, are they… same basic premise here.

       

      From: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com [mailto:anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill
      Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 12:45 AM
      To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

       

       

      I've been hesitant to weigh in on this thread for way too long... .Your discus is stressed!.. Send him on my way I'll take good care of him.   But let me get to the root of your issue... Why ANY CO2 in the first place?... You are just adding steriods to your tanks.  There is a natural balance between the water, the plants, the fish and the beneficial ferts they provide.  Let nature take it's cycle as closely as possible.  So many people try and micro-manage their tanks they just get in the way and mess things up.  Ferts?.. the fish and excess food supply that... They in turn give ya some ammonia that feeds both types of bacteria present in your filter media and the substrate AND the plants.. They in turn turn it into nitrite then nitrate.. then off into co2 land... hence the natural cycle continues... Mess with that by adding the steriods be they CO2 or ferts just demands that your constantly on top of your water chemistry on a daily basis.  

      Go look up a book written by Diane Walstad.  "he Ecology of the Planted Aquarium".  The theory being that you shouldn't even have to do ANY w/c's... nor any filtration.... I don't go that far.. but I do plant my tanks in that manner.   Bill in Va. 

      9 discus (6 scorpian blue - 3 pigeon blood)

      24 angels (5 platinum blue pearlskins, 1 orange/koi marble, 2 dd's, 5 silver, 9 Red/koi/marlbe, 4 lace tails.. 3 KK blue Marbles)

      5 blue german rams.

      5 apistogamma agassizi's

      boatload of tets of various types.

       

       


      From: Shaun Johnson <shaun.johnson2007@...>
      To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sat, April 30, 2011 12:05:39 AM
      Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

       

      Huh?? LOL. far as I know weekly water changes are ESSENTIAL when dosing with macro and mirco fertilzers. So you're saying to avoid water changes and just top off with distilled water?

       

      On another note, I upped the CO2 to about 6 bubbles a second and the fish seem a bit sluggish. 2 in particular (the baby whale and a discus) are going to the top regularly for air with the discus looking like he's gasping for air occasionally. Also, most of the Discus with blue in them are VERY dark... so... I think that may be a bit much so I turned the CO2 down to about 4 BPS (bubbles per sec). I was tempted to just keep it at 6 BPS but then have the air filter going as well but that would be Again, this is a 60"x23"x18" aquarium. I have it under 8 hours of high light (timer) ... Thoughts please! All the feedback you all give me is helpful... seriously. And I thank you in advance for it

       

       

      On Apr 28, 2011, at 9:52 AM, Nick Andrews wrote:

       

       

      Water change, what's that?  I only do a water change in my 55gal a couple of times a year at most, if I think the salts form all of the hard water (NM desert) are building up to crazy levels as the tank is uncovered and needs topping off once a week or so.

      On Sat, Apr 23, 2011 at 12:18 AM, Shaun Johnson <shaun.johnson2007@...> wrote:

       

      In dosing my 100 gal aquarium I'm trying to figure out a trace/micro combo fro my plants (some of which are red). A little background, Plants: 

      25 Bacopa Monnieri stems, 

      26 Potomogeton gayi, 

      25 ALTERNANTHERA REINECKII 'ROSAEFOLIA' (Red)

      6 Myriophyllum elatinoides, 

      6 Myriophyllum matogrossense (red), 

      1 Aponogeton Ulvaceus, 

      & a small Aponogeton Fenestralis. 

       

      Besides Macros (a whole OTHER story in itself), I dose dry (MICRO) Plantex CSM+B with a target ppm Fe of 0.50 which is about 3/8 tsp dosing 3x a week. Recently I found out about Iron Chelated (13%) which helps red leafed plants stay red & Ferrous Gluconate which I don't know much about. In any event, I'm trying to come up with a concoction of the 3 that would be the best for my plants. I had heard to use a ratio of 4:1:1 [That is 3/8tsp CSM+B, 3/32tsp Fe Chelated, & 3/32tsp Ferrous Gluonate] ...Anyone know how accurate this is? suggestions/ideas? 




      --
      Nick A

      "You know what I wish?  I wish that all the scum of the world had but a single throat, and I had my hands about it..."  Rorschach, 1975

      "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

      "Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them." Bill Vaughan

      "The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato

       

       

    • Shaun Johnson
      BTW ironically with all the issues Im having with the fertilizers and CO2 balancing act, the Madagascar lace plant (supposedly a hard one to grow) is
      Message 67 of 67 , May 1 4:58 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        BTW ironically with all the "issues" Im having with the fertilizers and CO2 balancing act, the Madagascar lace plant (supposedly a hard one to grow) is THRIVING in my aquarium (It's shaded under a big piece of driftwood)


        On May 1, 2011, at 3:24 PM, Brandon Smith wrote:

         

        I thnk you can do that with the AGA one. Do you remember if that site was classified by tank size and then allowed you to choose the size of the files you wanted to view?
         
        Brandon Smith
        Internet Sales Manager
        Jim Butler KIA
        (w) 636-256-9600
        (c) 314-6-07-3338



        From: Bill <williemcd@...>
        To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, May 1, 2011 1:11:51 PM
        Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

         

        The AGA site is one incredible display... It's not the one I was referencing but awesome none the less.  The one I was thinking of had a full page of displays that allowed you to click on each entry... 
        The AGA site is nice in that SOME of the entries give you the identification of each plant.... 
        Once I get rid of my orphans, I've got 4 tanks to landscape... low-tech but plenty of natural options.. 
        35g, 30gL, 29 euro and the 75... going to be tons of fun!.. Bill in Va. 


        From: David Williams <ingg1196@...>
        To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, May 1, 2011 10:50:47 AM
        Subject: RE: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

         

        IAPLC?

         

        http://en.iaplc.com/

         

        AGA?

         

        http://showcase.aquatic-gardeners.org/2010.cgi

         

        Those are the biggest two, also a  European one, search Acuavida.

         

        From: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com [mailto:anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brandon Smith
        Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 11:37 PM
        To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

         
         

        Which aquascapes? I have plenty of places to send you to feast your eyes on whatever scape you desire? I don't however have any recollection to the lightbulb scape though. 

        Drive safe,

         

        Brandon Smith

        Jim Butler KIA 

        636-256-9600


        On Apr 30, 2011, at 9:52 PM, Bill <williemcd@...> wrote:

         

        Brandon... glad you took it in the manner it was intended... Do YOU know that site that features all those incredible aquascapes?... Lissette has just got to see it!  Bill in Va. 

         

        From: Brandon Smith <bsmith717@...>
        To: "anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com" <anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com>
        Cc: "anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com" <anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sat, April 30, 2011 10:45:39 PM
        Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

         

        I would have to agree with you on that. I was at work today and didnt get a chance to read every response here so  I may have missed your point, or perhaps there were a few points. 

         

        It is my opinion (and anyone I know in the planted tank/aqua scaping community) that a tank certainly need not be high tech at all to be considered a "proper scape". I have a very low tech mini-m that is scaped with a piece if driftwood and a bunch or rarer crypts. No co2, no ferts (I do micros once a week) and it's lit by a wal mart desk lamp with a 13w spiral cfl. 

         

        Drive safe,

         

        Brandon Smith

        Jim Butler KIA 

        636-256-9600


        On Apr 30, 2011, at 8:41 PM, Lissette <lljdma06@...> wrote:

         

        My quibble is with the word aquascape or scape being associated primarily with a CO2 setup, fert dosed tank. A tank can be "scaped" & not have demanding plants. It's still a planted tank proper. Or is this not the case? 

        "If it's Baroque...don't fix it."

         


        On Apr 30, 2011, at 21:32, Brandon Smith <bsmith717@...> wrote:

         

        If ANYONE has a tank with more demanding plants (limnophilias, Ludwigias, etc) and does not dose co2 or water column ferts is certainly the exception not the rule. Also, just because you aren't dosing ferts to the water does not mean the plants aren't getting from somewhere like the substrate or if using tap water from there. 

         

        Eventually with highlight, co2 injected and water column dosed tank if demand for one of the the three is not met as was stated two posts below (by the man with the magnificent 180 said, bad things will happen. 

        Drive safe,

         

        Brandon Smith

        Jim Butler KIA 

        636-256-9600


        On Apr 30, 2011, at 7:04 PM, Lissette <lljdma06@...> wrote:

         

        I don't agree with you. You CAN have an aquascaped  tank senza CO2 & ferts. 

         

        Will post pictures when I'm done packing for my trip. Going go sing in West Virginia & then in NYC. I'm a classically trained contralto that indulges in planted tanks. 

        "If it's Baroque...don't fix it."

         


        On Apr 30, 2011, at 19:56, "David Williams" <ingg1196@...> wrote:

         

        Bill – I’m with you, and constantly fight micro-managing my tanks… and I don’t dose much in the way of ferts… but there are limitations to that.

         

        I’m going to share with the group probably the highest compliment I feel I have ever gotten, hopefully to show you what I mean.

         

        While setting up a tank for competition, I had the pleasure of having Neil Frank visit my home. Those who are involved in the planted tank hobby will probably know his name. We (we being GWAPA) were showing him the mineralized soil methods that several GWAPA members use (not far off from your topsoil, just sort of treated and preloaded for longer lasting ferts.) This is a high light tank, and injects CO2, but does almost no dosing – ferts come from the soil by and large

         

        His comment was along the lines of… “Holy cow, Diana needs to see THIS.” Three guesses which Diana he referred to. I’d been learning a lot from fellow hobbyists through GWAPA, most of whom remain far above my skill level, and was simply so proud that the effort had paid off. And still am.

         

        It isn’t set in a scape as of now, 180g are not fun to constantly keep tip top, but here are shots of the last couple setups:

         

        http://www.aac.acuavida.com/gallery/1146-2/180g_202009_20final.jpg

         

        http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/aquarium-pictures/showimage.php?i=5526&original=1&c=member&imageuser=6784

         

        The second shot being what Neil saw.

         

        Point being - There is a difference between plants in a tank and an aquascaped tank. I’m not saying your way can’t work to keep plants in a tank – I’m saying for a scaped tank, a higher tech tank, it just plain doesn’t work without CO2 and a plan for keeping the plants able to find and feed on ferts (unless specifically set for just Anubias and crypts sorta thing). That 180g of mine has 12x39 T5HO’s over it, in TEK fixtures. Turn them on for a month sans CO2, bad things happen. J Don’t turn them on, you don’t get the growth, the color, and half the plants in those scapes die.

         

        The tank Neil saw, by the by, cannot grow Eriocaulums for the record - no Blyxas or Toninas either…. Limitation of not dosing a water column. Some of the things folks want to do simply cannot be done “naturally” in a small cube of water.

         

        I can grow sags and vals without a light. Just a little something of sunlight through a window. I can keep Anubias alive in a closet in a Tupperware container for months….but I couldn’t have done the scapes above without CO2, a method for ferts, etc. Make sense?

         
         

        From: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com [mailto:anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill
        Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 1:01 PM
        To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

         
         

        Well.I've found Diana's methods work well for me.  I start with baked topsoil, covered with about 1.5 inches of pool filter sand.  I'm growing sags, crypts, vals, and a number of fineleafed plants.  Combined with a dozen larger angels, 3  3" discus, 10-12 assorted tets, 4 cory's and 2 plecos.. in a 125.  No ferts, no CO2.  My ammonia and Nitrites are zero, my nitrate will occassionaly spike to 5 in which case I'll siphon off about 5g to clean up some poop. I have a sizable HOB just stuffed with floss to host the bacteria and to provide a bit of water movement.  At the other end I use a bass-wood airstone to ensure there are no dead zones.  

        I could be and am probably wrong but I feel that some folks just like messing with their tanks too much and tend to micro-manage.  I know I'll not convert any of these types but hopefully someone new to the hobby will consider a more natural approach in addition to the typical "hands-on" method.  Bill in Va. 

         

        From: David Williams <ingg1196@...>
        To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sat, April 30, 2011 10:28:03 AM
        Subject: RE: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

         

        Yes, Bill, good read, but please do actually understand Diana’s methods. A baseline is emersed growth, packed to the gills with plants tanks, with very light bioloads. It does in some respects try to mimic nature.

         

        Know what happens in nature? You get an incredibly efficient induction of CO2 via emersed growth, incredibly light bioloads in comparison to what we do, filtration way more than what we do, and this is before we consider that most of the plants we keep are marginal marsh plants who immediately get up and out of the water given the option. J

         

        Diana, while I respect her work, does not show methodology that comes close to some of the modern capabilities, nor the needs of some of the more finicky plants out there,  and their respective abilities/requirements. It isn’t hard to pack a tank with Anubias and some narrow leaf ludwigia and let it grow out low tech. Try doing it with Eriocaulums. J Little different result, and if you aren’t balancing your tank, you won’t keep them long….

         

        So the reality is, if you want to “mimic” nature and still have all growth submersed, scaped, and grown in density, you are going to be using CO2, and finding a method of introducing macros. BTW – ever fertilized your lawn? Why not just do it “nature’s” way, fields of grass in nature…. But not like your lawn, are they… same basic premise here.

         

        From: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com [mailto:anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill
        Sent: Saturday, April 30, 2011 12:45 AM
        To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

         
         

        I've been hesitant to weigh in on this thread for way too long... .Your discus is stressed!.. Send him on my way I'll take good care of him.   But let me get to the root of your issue... Why ANY CO2 in the first place?... You are just adding steriods to your tanks.  There is a natural balance between the water, the plants, the fish and the beneficial ferts they provide.  Let nature take it's cycle as closely as possible.  So many people try and micro-manage their tanks they just get in the way and mess things up.  Ferts?.. the fish and excess food supply that... They in turn give ya some ammonia that feeds both types of bacteria present in your filter media and the substrate AND the plants.. They in turn turn it into nitrite then nitrate.. then off into co2 land... hence the natural cycle continues... Mess with that by adding the steriods be they CO2 or ferts just demands that your constantly on top of your water chemistry on a daily basis.  

        Go look up a book written by Diane Walstad.  "he Ecology of the Planted Aquarium".  The theory being that you shouldn't even have to do ANY w/c's... nor any filtration.... I don't go that far.. but I do plant my tanks in that manner.   Bill in Va. 

        9 discus (6 scorpian blue - 3 pigeon blood)

        24 angels (5 platinum blue pearlskins, 1 orange/koi marble, 2 dd's, 5 silver, 9 Red/koi/marlbe, 4 lace tails.. 3 KK blue Marbles)

        5 blue german rams.

        5 apistogamma agassizi's

        boatload of tets of various types.

         
         

        From: Shaun Johnson <shaun.johnson2007@...>
        To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sat, April 30, 2011 12:05:39 AM
        Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Issue #1: Fertilizers

         

        Huh?? LOL. far as I know weekly water changes are ESSENTIAL when dosing with macro and mirco fertilzers. So you're saying to avoid water changes and just top off with distilled water?

         

        On another note, I upped the CO2 to about 6 bubbles a second and the fish seem a bit sluggish. 2 in particular (the baby whale and a discus) are going to the top regularly for air with the discus looking like he's gasping for air occasionally. Also, most of the Discus with blue in them are VERY dark... so... I think that may be a bit much so I turned the CO2 down to about 4 BPS (bubbles per sec). I was tempted to just keep it at 6 BPS but then have the air filter going as well but that would be Again, this is a 60"x23"x18" aquarium. I have it under 8 hours of high light (timer) ... Thoughts please! All the feedback you all give me is helpful... seriously. And I thank you in advance for it

         
         

        On Apr 28, 2011, at 9:52 AM, Nick Andrews wrote:

         
         

        Water change, what's that?  I only do a water change in my 55gal a couple of times a year at most, if I think the salts form all of the hard water (NM desert) are building up to crazy levels as the tank is uncovered and needs topping off once a week or so.

        On Sat, Apr 23, 2011 at 12:18 AM, Shaun Johnson <shaun.johnson2007@...> wrote:

         

        In dosing my 100 gal aquarium I'm trying to figure out a trace/micro combo fro my plants (some of which are red). A little background, Plants: 

        25 Bacopa Monnieri stems, 

        26 Potomogeton gayi, 

        25 ALTERNANTHERA REINECKII 'ROSAEFOLIA' (Red)

        6 Myriophyllum elatinoides, 

        6 Myriophyllum matogrossense (red), 

        1 Aponogeton Ulvaceus, 

        & a small Aponogeton Fenestralis. 

         

        Besides Macros (a whole OTHER story in itself), I dose dry (MICRO) Plantex CSM+B with a target ppm Fe of 0.50 which is about 3/8 tsp dosing 3x a week. Recently I found out about Iron Chelated (13%) which helps red leafed plants stay red & Ferrous Gluconate which I don't know much about. In any event, I'm trying to come up with a concoction of the 3 that would be the best for my plants. I had heard to use a ratio of 4:1:1 [That is 3/8tsp CSM+B, 3/32tsp Fe Chelated, & 3/32tsp Ferrous Gluonate] ...Anyone know how accurate this is? suggestions/ideas? 




        --
        Nick A

        "You know what I wish?  I wish that all the scum of the world had but a single throat, and I had my hands about it..."  Rorschach, 1975

        "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

        "Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them." Bill Vaughan

        "The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato

         
         



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