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I need an expert opinion ---- Help

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  • IRWIN SCHENDOWICH
    Hello all, Happy New Year,      I don t often post here but I do read every comment that is posted and I believe that those of you that follow Mark s site
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 2, 2011
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    Hello all, Happy New Year,
         I don't often post here but I do read every comment that is posted and I believe that those of you that follow Mark's site are some of the most knowledgeable people there are in the fish hobby. I have a problem with two of my fish and normally I would just destroy them with a problem like this, but the two fish are flowerhorns and have some value to me. I hope someone can help advise me.
         I have attached two pictures so that you can see what is going on. I am far from being a photographer but you should be able to see that the bladder or stomach or what ever part of the fish's anatomy is now hanging externally from the fish and I think will probably cause death eventually. My concern is that there are two fish that are affected now and being as I have quite a few flowerhorns, I don't want any other fish to get infected.
         The fish in the picture is now about 4 months old. He is about 3 inches long and has been in perfect health until a week ago. He is housed in his own ten gallon aquarium with a large mystery snail and a sponge filter. The water is completely changed every five days just like in Betta culture, with the new fresh water coming from my swimming pool that is converted into a fish pond. His diet consists of high protein pellets, frozen San Francisco Bay brand adult brine shrimp, frozen Hikari blood worms, live mosquito larvae and live Daphna from an outdoor pool. The flowerhorns get fed three times a day but the fish affected have lost their appetite. I am concerned this might be a parasite problem but if that is the case, the source would have to be from the daphnia pool or the swimming pool and that's a scary thought.
          If any of you can venture an opinion to just what might be wrong and a possible cure or at least a prevention for my other young flowerhorns I sure would be grateful for your help.
          Thank you, Jack Schendowich 
    c

  • Tyler
    To me it looks like some kind of prolapse.  Not 100% sure though. No matter what the problem is, chances are you would need to take the fish to a vet that
    Message 2 of 4 , Jan 2, 2011
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      To me it looks like some kind of prolapse.  Not 100% sure though.

      No matter what the problem is, chances are you would need to take the fish to a vet that specializes in fish.

      --- On Sun, 1/2/11, IRWIN SCHENDOWICH <jacksbettas@...> wrote:

      From: IRWIN SCHENDOWICH <jacksbettas@...>
      Subject: [anubiasdesign] I need an expert opinion ---- Help [2 Attachments]
      To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, January 2, 2011, 12:50 PM

       

      Hello all, Happy New Year,
           I don't often post here but I do read every comment that is posted and I believe that those of you that follow Mark's site are some of the most knowledgeable people there are in the fish hobby. I have a problem with two of my fish and normally I would just destroy them with a problem like this, but the two fish are flowerhorns and have some value to me. I hope someone can help advise me.
           I have attached two pictures so that you can see what is going on. I am far from being a photographer but you should be able to see that the bladder or stomach or what ever part of the fish's anatomy is now hanging externally from the fish and I think will probably cause death eventually. My concern is that there are two fish that are affected now and being as I have quite a few flowerhorns, I don't want any other fish to get infected.
           The fish in the picture is now about 4 months old. He is about 3 inches long and has been in perfect health until a week ago. He is housed in his own ten gallon aquarium with a large mystery snail and a sponge filter. The water is completely changed every five days just like in Betta culture, with the new fresh water coming from my swimming pool that is converted into a fish pond. His diet consists of high protein pellets, frozen San Francisco Bay brand adult brine shrimp, frozen Hikari blood worms, live mosquito larvae and live Daphna from an outdoor pool. The flowerhorns get fed three times a day but the fish affected have lost their appetite. I am concerned this might be a parasite problem but if that is the case, the source would have to be from the daphnia pool or the swimming pool and that's a scary thought.
            If any of you can venture an opinion to just what might be wrong and a possible cure or at least a prevention for my other young flowerhorns I sure would be grateful for your help.
            Thank you, Jack Schendowich 
      c


    • Gordon C.. Snelling
      ... Looks like you have an intestinal prolapse there. They can be caused by a number of things and are often fatal. not sure how to treat them though. They
      Message 3 of 4 , Jan 2, 2011
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        On 1/2/2011 9:50 AM, IRWIN SCHENDOWICH wrote:
         

        Hello all, Happy New Year,
             I don't often post here but I do read every comment that is posted and I believe that those of you that follow Mark's site are some of the most knowledgeable people there are in the fish hobby. I have a problem with two of my fish and normally I would just destroy them with a problem like this, but the two fish are flowerhorns and have some value to me. I hope someone can help advise me.
             I have attached two pictures so that you can see what is going on. I am far from being a photographer but you should be able to see that the bladder or stomach or what ever part of the fish's anatomy is now hanging externally from the fish and I think will probably cause death eventually. My concern is that there are two fish that are affected now and being as I have quite a few flowerhorns, I don't want any other fish to get infected.
             The fish in the picture is now about 4 months old. He is about 3 inches long and has been in perfect health until a week ago. He is housed in his own ten gallon aquarium with a large mystery snail and a sponge filter. The water is completely changed every five days just like in Betta culture, with the new fresh water coming from my swimming pool that is converted into a fish pond. His diet consists of high protein pellets, frozen San Francisco Bay brand adult brine shrimp, frozen Hikari blood worms, live mosquito larvae and live Daphna from an outdoor pool. The flowerhorns get fed three times a day but the fish affected have lost their appetite. I am concerned this might be a parasite problem but if that is the case, the source would have to be from the daphnia pool or the swimming pool and that's a scary thought.
              If any of you can venture an opinion to just what might be wrong and a possible cure or at least a prevention for my other young flowerhorns I sure would be grateful for your help.
              Thank you, Jack Schendowich 
        c

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        Looks like you have an intestinal prolapse there. They can be caused by a number of things and are often fatal. not sure how to treat them though. They will sometimes clear themselves but this one looks pretty severe and sorry to say the fish is probably going to die.


      • pineapple-tomato-human
        I agree, that looks like an intestinal prolapse. Your best chance of saving the fish is likely to take them to a vet that treats fish, but my experience with
        Message 4 of 4 , Jan 3, 2011
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          I agree, that looks like an intestinal prolapse. Your best chance of saving the fish is likely to take them to a vet that treats fish, but my experience with mice and hamsters says that even if you can cure the prolapse, it's liable to recur.

          Prolapse can be caused by a number of things, but with the small mammals is usually a bacterial infection in the gut or heavy internal parasite load. My GUESS (emphasis because I'm not a vet) would be that you may be introducing parasites by bringing in water from the outside pond.

          - Miriam

          --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, IRWIN SCHENDOWICH <jacksbettas@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello all, Happy New Year,
          >      I don't often post here but I do read every comment that is posted and I believe that those of you that follow Mark's site are some of the most knowledgeable people there are in the fish hobby. I have a problem with two of my fish and normally I would just destroy them with a problem like this, but the two fish are flowerhorns and have some value to me. I hope someone can help advise me.
          >      I have attached two pictures so that you can see what is going on. I am far from being a photographer but you should be able to see that the bladder or stomach or what ever part of the fish's anatomy is now hanging externally from the fish and I think will probably cause death eventually. My concern is that there are two fish that are affected now and being as I have quite a few flowerhorns, I don't want any other fish to get infected.
          >      The fish in the picture is now about 4 months old. He is about 3 inches long and has been in perfect health until a week ago. He is housed in his own ten gallon aquarium with a large mystery snail and a sponge filter. The water is completely changed every five days just like in Betta culture, with the new fresh water coming from my swimming pool that is converted into a fish pond. His diet consists of high protein pellets, frozen San Francisco Bay brand adult brine shrimp, frozen Hikari blood worms, live mosquito larvae and live Daphna from an outdoor pool. The flowerhorns get fed three times a day but the fish affected have lost their appetite. I am concerned this might be a parasite problem but if that is the case, the source would have to be from the daphnia pool or the swimming pool and that's a scary thought.
          >       If any of you can venture an opinion to just what might be wrong and a possible cure or at least a prevention for my other young flowerhorns I sure would be grateful for your help.
          >       Thank you, Jack Schendowich 
          > c
          >
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