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Re: [anubiasdesign] Re: Plants & Algae

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  • Terry Barber
    Most folks have abandoned using heater cables in planted aquariums. TerryB ... From: KBlinderman@aol.com To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday,
    Message 1 of 17 , Jan 2, 2006
      Most folks have abandoned using heater cables in planted aquariums.
       
      TerryB
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, January 02, 2006 2:09 AM
      Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Re: Plants & Algae

      Can't think of an easy way to pull that one off. sorry. If you do tear one down or start a new one put in a heater cable cover it with sand to disperse the heat evenly and support it. Then a thin layer of nutient rich substrate such as something red-clay based that releases the nutrients slowly but at a constant rate. finally top it with at least 1.5" of gravel and plant only in this layer. Do not disturb the clay layer.
       
       Steve
       
    • Jan Schmid
      Hi Jackie, You have a couple of other things that need to be addressed before you can really get your tanks balanced and the plants off to a good start. As was
      Message 2 of 17 , Jan 2, 2006
        Hi Jackie,
         
        You have a couple of other things that need to be addressed before you can really get your tanks balanced and the plants off to a good start.
         
        As was already mentioned, the "inch per gallon" rule is really vague, and at best can only be used as a rough estimate for tiny fish without the body mass.
        Your tanks are heavily stocked, and many of those fish have the potential to grow much bigger, and that's going to intensify your problem.
         
        As for the milky water, what are your water parameters on things like ammonia, nitrite and nitrates?  Those things can really help figure out what's going on in the tank and help remedy them.  You shouldn't be getting the bloom after 2 months unless you're somehow wiping out your good bacteria, or the tank is so overloaded that it can't keep up with the waste load (more likely).
        Yes, the cloudiness should eventually go away, but your fish probably aren't living in the best conditions right now if they have high nitrites, ammonia or things like that.
         
        I would stop using the Cycle, Stress Coat and Biozyme.  They do nothing to help cycle the tank, and in some cases may be deterring your tank from getting through the true cycle.  The best thing you can do right now is lots of water changes using only dechlor (if you have city water), and keep an eye on those water parameters.
        I also agree that it would be best to cut those fish loads way down, whether it be by getting another tank, or giving some to your local store.
         
        Then, as mentioned, get some fast growing plants, and use a fert dosing method like Bailin suggested.
         
        Before you know it, you'll have a beautiful, thriving tank of fish and plants. :)
         
        Jan
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, January 01, 2006 11:14 PM
        Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Re: Plants & Algae

        Dave,
         
        I don't belive I'm overstocked.  The method of an inch of fish per gallon of water is how the tanks are stocked. 
         
        After a ten year absence from fish,  I started back up this past July.  Just recently, past two months, I upgraded the tanks to 75 gallon aquariums.  I feel confident that the cloudiness will go away.  It did in the 55 gallon.
         
        Liquid fertilizers haven't been used for about two weeks now.  The only water treatment used is "Stress Coat" in partial water changes.  "Biozyme" and Nutrafin's "Cycle" on a weekly basis.  All this through the recommended doses.
         
        The lights are on 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM.
         
        I'm hoping by using the suggestions from this excellent group of hobbyists will help.  It can't hurt. 
         
        Plus, I might not planted heavier enough from the start. I read that tonight.  I'm researching fast growing plant species tonight.
         
        Thank you,
         
        Jackie 
         
         
        -------Original Message-------
         
        Date: Sunday, January 01, 2006 23:38:05
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      • Mike Luchsinger
        I agree wholeheartely with Jan. Cycling products are largely unecessary outside of the initial cycle (and the only one that has ever worked for me was
        Message 3 of 17 , Jan 2, 2006
          I agree wholeheartely with Jan. 

          Cycling products are largely unecessary outside of the initial cycle (and the only one that has ever worked for me was Bio-Spira) and sometimes do more damage than good.
          Cloudy water is usually a cluprit of one of three conditions: overfeeding, bacterial blooms, and precipitate of an additive, or a combination of the above.

          Water changes, no additives is the best place to start.

          I have had tanks that have been grossly overpopulated, but required insane amounts of maintenance, and never grew plants that well because of the required maintenance tasks.
          Fast growing plants like hygrophilia, anacharis, hornwort, water wisteria, and water sprite certaainly may help as well.

          mike

          mntropical@... wrote:
          Hi Jackie,
           
          You have a couple of other things that need to be addressed before you can really get your tanks balanced and the plants off to a good start.
           
          As was already mentioned, the "inch per gallon" rule is really vague, and at best can only be used as a rough estimate for tiny fish without the body mass.
          Your tanks are heavily stocked, and many of those fish have the potential to grow much bigger, and that's going to intensify your problem.
           
          As for the milky water, what are your water parameters on things like ammonia, nitrite and nitrates?  Those things can really help figure out what's going on in the tank and help remedy them.  You shouldn't be getting the bloom after 2 months unless you're somehow wiping out your good bacteria, or the tank is so overloaded that it can't keep up with the waste load (more likely).
          Yes, the cloudiness should eventually go away, but your fish probably aren't living in the best conditions right now if they have high nitrites, ammonia or things like that.
           
          I would stop using the Cycle, Stress Coat and Biozyme.  They do nothing to help cycle the tank, and in some cases may be deterring your tank from getting through the true cycle.  The best thing you can do right now is lots of water changes using only dechlor (if you have city water), and keep an eye on those water parameters.
          I also agree that it would be best to cut those fish loads way down, whether it be by getting another tank, or giving some to your local store.
           
          Then, as mentioned, get some fast growing plants, and use a fert dosing method like Bailin suggested.
           
          Before you know it, you'll have a beautiful, thriving tank of fish and plants. :)
           
          Jan
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, January 01, 2006 11:14 PM
          Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Re: Plants & Algae

          Dave,
           
          I don't belive I'm overstocked.  The method of an inch of fish per gallon of water is how the tanks are stocked. 
           
          After a ten year absence from fish,  I started back up this past July.  Just recently, past two months, I upgraded the tanks to 75 gallon aquariums.  I feel confident that the cloudiness will go away.  It did in the 55 gallon.
           
          Liquid fertilizers haven't been used for about two weeks now.  The only water treatment used is "Stress Coat" in partial water changes.  "Biozyme" and Nutrafin's "Cycle" on a weekly basis.  All this through the recommended doses.
           
          The lights are on 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM.
           
          I'm hoping by using the suggestions from this excellent group of hobbyists will help.  It can't hurt. 
           
          Plus, I might not planted heavier enough from the start. I read that tonight.  I'm researching fast growing plant species tonight.
           
          Thank you,
           
          Jackie 
           
           
          -------Original Message-------
           
          Date: Sunday, January 01, 2006 23:38:05



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        • ccallow@bellsouth.net
          Thanks to everyone for their wonderful advice. I will implement some of them and get back in a couple weeks on the progress. First, the fish stock will be
          Message 4 of 17 , Jan 3, 2006
            Thanks to everyone for their wonderful advice.  I will implement some of them and get back in a couple weeks on the progress.
             
            First, the fish stock will be thinned down.  Problem, which ones?  Probably, the easiest way is to go strictly all New World.  Maybe, the Clown Loaches are the only exception.
             
            Second, my tap water perimeters are: 
             
                pH:  7.3
             
                KH:  6 dH
             
                GH:  18 dgH
             
            Third,  eliminated all water treatment except for Stress Coat which I use to dechlor.
             
            Again, Thank you and God "Bless",
             
            Jackie 
             
            -------Original Message-------
             
            Date: Tuesday, January 03, 2006 05:15:07
            Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Re: Plants & Algae
             
            I agree wholeheartely with Jan. 

            Cycling products are largely unecessary outside of the initial cycle (and the only one that has ever worked for me was Bio-Spira) and sometimes do more damage than good.
            Cloudy water is usually a cluprit of one of three conditions: overfeeding, bacterial blooms, and precipitate of an additive, or a combination of the above.

            Water changes, no additives is the best place to start.

            I have had tanks that have been grossly overpopulated, but required insane amounts of maintenance, and never grew plants that well because of the required maintenance tasks.
            Fast growing plants like hygrophilia, anacharis, hornwort, water wisteria, and water sprite certaainly may help as well.

            mike

            mntropical@... wrote:
            Hi Jackie,
             
            You have a couple of other things that need to be addressed before you can really get your tanks balanced and the plants off to a good start.
             
            As was already mentioned, the "inch per gallon" rule is really vague, and at best can only be used as a rough estimate for tiny fish without the body mass.
            Your tanks are heavily stocked, and many of those fish have the potential to grow much bigger, and that's going to intensify your problem.
             
            As for the milky water, what are your water parameters on things like ammonia, nitrite and nitrates?  Those things can really help figure out what's going on in the tank and help remedy them.  You shouldn't be getting the bloom after 2 months unless you're somehow wiping out your good bacteria, or the tank is so overloaded that it can't keep up with the waste load (more likely).
            Yes, the cloudiness should eventually go away, but your fish probably aren't living in the best conditions right now if they have high nitrites, ammonia or things like that.
             
            I would stop using the Cycle, Stress Coat and Biozyme.  They do nothing to help cycle the tank, and in some cases may be deterring your tank from getting through the true cycle.  The best thing you can do right now is lots of water changes using only dechlor (if you have city water), and keep an eye on those water parameters.
            I also agree that it would be best to cut those fish loads way down, whether it be by getting another tank, or giving some to your local store.
             
            Then, as mentioned, get some fast growing plants, and use a fert dosing method like Bailin suggested.
             
            Before you know it, you'll have a beautiful, thriving tank of fish and plants. :)
             
            Jan
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, January 01, 2006 11:14 PM
            Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Re: Plants & Algae

            Dave,
             
            I don't belive I'm overstocked.  The method of an inch of fish per gallon of water is how the tanks are stocked. 
             
            After a ten year absence from fish,  I started back up this past July.  Just recently, past two months, I upgraded the tanks to 75 gallon aquariums.  I feel confident that the cloudiness will go away.  It did in the 55 gallon.
             
            Liquid fertilizers haven't been used for about two weeks now.  The only water treatment used is "Stress Coat" in partial water changes.  "Biozyme" and Nutrafin's "Cycle" on a weekly basis.  All this through the recommended doses.
             
            The lights are on 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM.
             
            I'm hoping by using the suggestions from this excellent group of hobbyists will help.  It can't hurt. 
             
            Plus, I might not planted heavier enough from the start. I read that tonight.  I'm researching fast growing plant species tonight.
             
            Thank you,
             
            Jackie 
             
             
            -------Original Message-------
             
            Date: Sunday, January 01, 2006 23:38:05



             
            Add FUN to your email - CLICK HERE!
          • Julie Zeppieri
            Jackie, Food for thought on stock reduction... Uaru are plant eaters for the most part, and therefore are not usually recommended for planted tanks at all.
            Message 5 of 17 , Jan 4, 2006
              Jackie,

              Food for thought on stock reduction...

              Uaru are plant eaters for the most part, and therefore are not usually
              recommended for planted tanks at all. Exceptions have been heard of,
              especially if a) you are feeding them LOTS of greenies, and b) you never let
              them read anything that says they are not supposed to be able to be kept in
              plant tanks (hope they can't see your monitor?). :-)

              Geos are big-time diggers, so perhaps could live with the Uaru in a tank
              that wasn't so planted? If you do want plants with diggers, try lots of
              ferns, mosses, Anubias, etc attached to bogwood. You get the plants and the
              look, but the diggers can't dig it all up.

              Perhaps do some research on who will probably do best with plants and then
              keep them together that way. Keep plants in with those who should behave
              best, other options in tanks with those not likely to be so "good." Also do
              some checks into adult sizes so you can populate the tanks based on adult
              sizes. This will make estimating good stocking levels easier than if you
              were to go by current size. You have heavily stocked tanks now, but when
              those fish are all grown some tanks will be totally out of control for you.

              Hope this helps some? :-)

              Julie <'><


              >From: "ccallow@..." <ccallow@...>
              >Reply-To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com
              >To: <anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com>
              >Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Re: Plants & Algae
              >Date: Tue, 3 Jan 2006 14:09:24 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
              >
              >Thanks to everyone for their wonderful advice. I will implement some of
              >them and get back in a couple weeks on the progress.
              >
              >First, the fish stock will be thinned down. Problem, which ones?
              >Probably,
              >the easiest way is to go strictly all New World. Maybe, the Clown Loaches
              >are the only exception.
              >
              >Second, my tap water perimeters are:
              >
              > pH: 7.3
              >
              > KH: 6 dH
              >
              > GH: 18 dgH
              >
              >Third, eliminated all water treatment except for Stress Coat which I use
              >to
              >dechlor.
              >
              >Again, Thank you and God "Bless",
              >
              >Jackie
              >
            • ccallow@bellsouth.net
              Julie, Thanks for the advise. I m in the process of thinning my fish now. All my Congos are gone. The Synodontis catfish and sharks are next. I haven t made
              Message 6 of 17 , Jan 5, 2006
                Julie,
                 
                Thanks for the advise.  I'm in the process of thinning my fish now.  All my Congos are gone. The Synodontis catfish and sharks are next.  I haven't made my decision between the Diamond Tetras or the Rosy Barbs.  The barbs are the fancy long fin and neon varieties.  The Cichlids will be hard for me part with especially the Rainbows and Keyholes.
                 
                That Uaru is one of my favorites.   I'll work something out with it and the Severum.  My biggest plant destroyer is the seven inch Satanoperca sp. Redlips.  I'm thinking about planting that tank with just big swords and crypts.
                 
                Thank you and God "Bless",
                 
                Jackie
                 
                -------Original Message-------
                 
                Date: Thursday, January 05, 2006 01:09:20
                Subject: Re: [anubiasdesign] Re: Plants & Algae
                 
                Jackie,

                Food for thought on stock reduction...

                Uaru are plant eaters for the most part, and therefore are not usually
                recommended for planted tanks at all. Exceptions have been heard of,
                especially if a) you are feeding them LOTS of greenies, and b) you never let
                them read anything that says they are not supposed to be able to be kept in
                plant tanks (hope they can't see your monitor?).  :-)

                Geos are big-time diggers, so perhaps could live with the Uaru in a tank
                that wasn't so planted? If you do want plants with diggers, try lots of
                ferns, mosses, Anubias, etc attached to bogwood. You get the plants and the
                look, but the diggers can't dig it all up.

                Perhaps do some research on who will probably do best with plants and then
                keep them together that way. Keep plants in with those who should behave
                best, other options in tanks with those not likely to be so "good." Also do
                some checks into adult sizes so you can populate the tanks based on adult
                sizes. This will make estimating good stocking levels easier than if you
                were to go by current size. You have heavily stocked tanks now, but when
                those fish are all grown some tanks will be totally out of control for you.

                Hope this helps some?  :-)

                Julie  <'><


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