Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [anubiasdesign] Re: Infusoria

Expand Messages
  • billyhbauer
    May I get some? My betes are breedig well. Bill Bauer 242 Highland dr Wmsvl, NY 14221 ... From: Gerald To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, July
    Message 1 of 80 , Jul 31, 2010
      May I get some? My betes are breedig well.
      Bill Bauer
      242 Highland dr
      Wmsvl, NY 14221
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Gerald
      Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2010 11:15 AM
      Subject: [anubiasdesign] Re: Infusoria

       

      One problem with starting infusoria from pond water, tank water or green water is your culture may not be dominated by bugs that are suitable in size, behavior and nutrition for the fry you're trying to feed. Usually when I've tried this I get high densities of tiny fast-swimming protozoa that newborn fry can't or won't eat, and few of the larger good-food bugs. For feeding tiny fry like Badis, Dario, Betta, Elassoma, Enneacanthus, Tateurndina, etc I have better luck with Philodina rotifers. They spend most of their time on surfaces, rather than swimming, so they're easier prey for fry that stay near the bottom or among plants. I can mail you a free starter culture if you like. I use well water from a friend's house or bottled spring water; my tap water doesnt work so well for Philodina. Add a pinch of yeast, baby cereal or fish food, and sugar, then add rotifers after a day or 2 when it gets cloudy. Keep 3 or 4 jars going in rotation. If those tiny fast bugs take over, I dump it and restart from a good rotifer culture. Having a strong hand lens or weak microscope available to check what bugs are dominant is useful. I think Paros will need high-quality food smaller than Artemia for the first couple weeks.

      --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, "galaxie_pete" <galaxie_pete@...> wrote:
      >
      > When you see kind of a haze around the potatoes, look for movement in it. At point it should be ready to go. I would start a new one about 3 weeks in. When I am doing it in little jars or containers I try and have a couple going. I don't know what you are trying to feed with it but you also want to make sure you have enough going to feed whatever it is which can take multiple cultures.
      >
      > I use a pipette to draw in some of the water right next to the food source. That's where everything is most concentrated. Also I try and start very small fry in very small tanks usually 2.5 or 5.5 gallon. It easier to keep them concentrated enough to feed that way. One of the nice things about infusoria is it is hard to overfeed with it. They are not going to die in an hour or two like BBS or microworms.
      >
      > Good Luck
      > Pete
      >
      > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, Lainey Alexander <lainealex@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Thanks very much, Pete. I just set up two bottles of quick boiled
      > > potatoes in tank water. How long will I be able to use this type of
      > > culture for? In other words, when should I make a new one? Also, how
      > > will I know when these ones are "ready"?
      > >
      > > Lainey
      > > http://www.grasslandsgouldians.com
      > >
      > > On Jul 21, 2010, at 3:44 PM, galaxie_pete wrote:
      > >
      > > > Lainey,
      > > >
      > > > I have used potato chunks (small cubes) and a handful of split
      > > > dried green peas in the past. I use tank water. You can use ditch/
      > > > pond/river/lake/swamp water since there are plenty of organisms pre-
      > > > populating it; but I am cautious about using those sources. Under
      > > > the right conditions about a week I think using tank water. It's
      > > > been a while. Anymore I have a rain water bucket sitting outside
      > > > with a bunch of grass clippings in it during the fair weather
      > > > months. Usually it ends up turning to green water on me in
      > > > relatively short time. I don't mind but a lot of people don't want
      > > > the algae.
      > > >
      > > > Yes the water can get quite smelly, rotting vegetation has a way of
      > > > doing that. I compare the smell I sometime manage to create to the
      > > > swamp water I had all around me growing up. Just keep your cultures
      > > > relatively fresh. A lot of the cultures can really smell but potato
      > > > is some of the least smelly. When I found instant potatoes worked
      > > > so well for microworms I was ecstatic because the cultures do not
      > > > smell hardly at all in comparison.
      > > >
      > > > Pete
      > > >
      > > > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, Lainey Alexander
      > > > <lainealex@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Can someone walk me through a simple and effective way to culture
      > > > > infusoria? I tried the rotten lettuce in tank water technique and
      > > > all
      > > > > I got was some stuff that stunk up my entire kitchen and had to be
      > > > > tossed. Is a potato wedge in tank water a better plan? How long does
      > > > > it take for the infusoria to be ready for harvesting?
      > > > >
      > > > > Thank you.
      > > > >
      > > > > Lainey
      > > > > http://www.grasslandsgouldians.com
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >



      No virus found in this incoming message.
      Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
      Version: 8.5.441 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3023 - Release Date: 07/23/10 06:36:00
    • billyhbauer
      May I get some? My betes are breedig well. Bill Bauer 242 Highland dr Wmsvl, NY 14221 ... From: Gerald To: anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, July
      Message 80 of 80 , Jul 31, 2010
        May I get some? My betes are breedig well.
        Bill Bauer
        242 Highland dr
        Wmsvl, NY 14221
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Gerald
        Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2010 11:15 AM
        Subject: [anubiasdesign] Re: Infusoria

         

        One problem with starting infusoria from pond water, tank water or green water is your culture may not be dominated by bugs that are suitable in size, behavior and nutrition for the fry you're trying to feed. Usually when I've tried this I get high densities of tiny fast-swimming protozoa that newborn fry can't or won't eat, and few of the larger good-food bugs. For feeding tiny fry like Badis, Dario, Betta, Elassoma, Enneacanthus, Tateurndina, etc I have better luck with Philodina rotifers. They spend most of their time on surfaces, rather than swimming, so they're easier prey for fry that stay near the bottom or among plants. I can mail you a free starter culture if you like. I use well water from a friend's house or bottled spring water; my tap water doesnt work so well for Philodina. Add a pinch of yeast, baby cereal or fish food, and sugar, then add rotifers after a day or 2 when it gets cloudy. Keep 3 or 4 jars going in rotation. If those tiny fast bugs take over, I dump it and restart from a good rotifer culture. Having a strong hand lens or weak microscope available to check what bugs are dominant is useful. I think Paros will need high-quality food smaller than Artemia for the first couple weeks.

        --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, "galaxie_pete" <galaxie_pete@...> wrote:
        >
        > When you see kind of a haze around the potatoes, look for movement in it. At point it should be ready to go. I would start a new one about 3 weeks in. When I am doing it in little jars or containers I try and have a couple going. I don't know what you are trying to feed with it but you also want to make sure you have enough going to feed whatever it is which can take multiple cultures.
        >
        > I use a pipette to draw in some of the water right next to the food source. That's where everything is most concentrated. Also I try and start very small fry in very small tanks usually 2.5 or 5.5 gallon. It easier to keep them concentrated enough to feed that way. One of the nice things about infusoria is it is hard to overfeed with it. They are not going to die in an hour or two like BBS or microworms.
        >
        > Good Luck
        > Pete
        >
        > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, Lainey Alexander <lainealex@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Thanks very much, Pete. I just set up two bottles of quick boiled
        > > potatoes in tank water. How long will I be able to use this type of
        > > culture for? In other words, when should I make a new one? Also, how
        > > will I know when these ones are "ready"?
        > >
        > > Lainey
        > > http://www.grasslandsgouldians.com
        > >
        > > On Jul 21, 2010, at 3:44 PM, galaxie_pete wrote:
        > >
        > > > Lainey,
        > > >
        > > > I have used potato chunks (small cubes) and a handful of split
        > > > dried green peas in the past. I use tank water. You can use ditch/
        > > > pond/river/lake/swamp water since there are plenty of organisms pre-
        > > > populating it; but I am cautious about using those sources. Under
        > > > the right conditions about a week I think using tank water. It's
        > > > been a while. Anymore I have a rain water bucket sitting outside
        > > > with a bunch of grass clippings in it during the fair weather
        > > > months. Usually it ends up turning to green water on me in
        > > > relatively short time. I don't mind but a lot of people don't want
        > > > the algae.
        > > >
        > > > Yes the water can get quite smelly, rotting vegetation has a way of
        > > > doing that. I compare the smell I sometime manage to create to the
        > > > swamp water I had all around me growing up. Just keep your cultures
        > > > relatively fresh. A lot of the cultures can really smell but potato
        > > > is some of the least smelly. When I found instant potatoes worked
        > > > so well for microworms I was ecstatic because the cultures do not
        > > > smell hardly at all in comparison.
        > > >
        > > > Pete
        > > >
        > > > --- In anubiasdesign@yahoogroups.com, Lainey Alexander
        > > > <lainealex@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Can someone walk me through a simple and effective way to culture
        > > > > infusoria? I tried the rotten lettuce in tank water technique and
        > > > all
        > > > > I got was some stuff that stunk up my entire kitchen and had to be
        > > > > tossed. Is a potato wedge in tank water a better plan? How long does
        > > > > it take for the infusoria to be ready for harvesting?
        > > > >
        > > > > Thank you.
        > > > >
        > > > > Lainey
        > > > > http://www.grasslandsgouldians.com
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >



        No virus found in this incoming message.
        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
        Version: 8.5.441 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3023 - Release Date: 07/23/10 06:36:00
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.