Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: HumAnt (XML is evil and other non-ANTLR topics)

Expand Messages
  • iank@bearcave.com
    ... Yet another example that Terence rocks! I recall that in the early days XML was described as a format for computer communication, not for humans to read
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 24, 2004
      > Note that I'm conversing with Matt Benson at the moment to create
      > HumAnt, a human readable version of Ant with its filthy xml spec.
      > Oddly enough what I came up with looks like make w/o the whitespace
      > issue. ;)

      Yet another example that Terence rocks!

      I recall that in the early days XML was described as a format for
      computer communication, not for humans to read and write. Yet we
      now find ourselves in a world where we're writing XML all them
      time. Resin uses an XML configuration file, SOAP uses an XML
      configuration file. My colleagues build tools that read human
      written XML. And then there is Ant, that also takes XML as input.
      Yech! HumAnt sounds like a great idea. XML as a language is very
      awkward.

      Ian
    • micheal_jor
      ... ... Only as a Ant preprocessor. Why re-invent the [Ant] wheel hey?. In any case, who would maintain a forked HumAnt version of Ant in future when
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 24, 2004
        --- In antlr-interest@yahoogroups.com, iank@b... wrote:

        <SNIP>

        > And then there is Ant, that also takes XML as input.
        > Yech! HumAnt sounds like a great idea.

        Only as a Ant preprocessor. Why re-invent the [Ant] wheel hey?.

        In any case, who would maintain a forked HumAnt version of Ant in
        future when Ter is busy with ANTLR3, StringTemplate, lectures, new
        projects etc...

        Micheal
        ANTLR/C#
      • Terence Parr
        ... No worries folks...just doing a preprocessor that hooks into ant directly ;) Trying to make a statement. Ter -- CS Professor & Grad Director, University
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 24, 2004
          On Nov 24, 2004, at 2:05 PM, micheal_jor wrote:

          >
          >
          > --- In antlr-interest@yahoogroups.com, iank@b... wrote:
          >
          > <SNIP>
          >
          >> And then there is Ant, that also takes XML as input.
          >> Yech! HumAnt sounds like a great idea.
          >
          > Only as a Ant preprocessor. Why re-invent the [Ant] wheel hey?.
          >
          > In any case, who would maintain a forked HumAnt version of Ant in
          > future when Ter is busy with ANTLR3, StringTemplate, lectures, new
          > projects etc...

          No worries folks...just doing a preprocessor that hooks into ant
          directly ;) Trying to make a statement.

          Ter
          --
          CS Professor & Grad Director, University of San Francisco
          Creator, ANTLR Parser Generator, http://www.antlr.org
          Cofounder, http://www.jguru.com
          Cofounder, http://www.knowspam.net enjoy email again!
        • Matt Benson
          ... Indeed. Fear not, Micheal... know that there are basically two ways to implement HumAnt without necessitating ongoing maintenance. First, Ant is
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 24, 2004
            --- micheal_jor <open.zone@...> wrote:
            > --- In antlr-interest@yahoogroups.com, iank@b...
            > wrote:
            > <SNIP>
            > > And then there is Ant, that also takes XML as
            > input.
            > > Yech! HumAnt sounds like a great idea.
            >
            > Only as a Ant preprocessor. Why re-invent the [Ant]
            > wheel hey?.
            >
            > In any case, who would maintain a forked HumAnt
            > version of Ant in
            > future when Ter is busy with ANTLR3, StringTemplate,
            > lectures, new
            > projects etc...

            Indeed. Fear not, Micheal... know that there are
            basically two ways to implement HumAnt without
            necessitating ongoing maintenance. First, Ant is
            structured to allow pluggable Project configuration so
            that HumAnt could provide an implementation of a class
            called ProjectHelper. This might allow more freedom
            in the syntax definition although I don't expect there
            to be much freedom to be won from the basic concepts
            of XML attributes and elements. A second and simpler
            option is, as you seem to suggest, to implement HumAnt
            so that it provides a SAX Parser implementation,
            emitting XML events from non-XML input. Perhaps a
            hack but also much easier to implement...

            -Matt
            >
            > Micheal
            > ANTLR/C#
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            > antlr-interest-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >





            __________________________________
            Do you Yahoo!?
            Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we.
            http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail
          • Monty Zukowski
            ... You may find some inspiration in the XML shorthands such as YAML or PSLT. Monty
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 25, 2004
              On Nov 24, 2004, at 6:48 PM, Matt Benson wrote:

              > A second and simpler
              > option is, as you seem to suggest, to implement HumAnt
              > so that it provides a SAX Parser implementation,
              > emitting XML events from non-XML input. Perhaps a
              > hack but also much easier to implement...

              You may find some inspiration in the XML shorthands such as YAML or
              PSLT.

              Monty
            • Matt Benson
              Monty: I have heard of and read about YAML before, but not PSLT. Googling doesn t seem to yield useful results. Got a link? Thanks, Matt ...
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 30, 2004
                Monty: I have heard of and read about YAML before,
                but not PSLT. Googling doesn't seem to yield useful
                results. Got a link?

                Thanks,
                Matt

                --- Monty Zukowski <monty@...> wrote:

                >
                > On Nov 24, 2004, at 6:48 PM, Matt Benson wrote:
                >
                > > A second and simpler
                > > option is, as you seem to suggest, to implement
                > HumAnt
                > > so that it provides a SAX Parser implementation,
                > > emitting XML events from non-XML input. Perhaps a
                > > hack but also much easier to implement...
                >
                > You may find some inspiration in the XML shorthands
                > such as YAML or
                > PSLT.
                >
                > Monty
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                > antlr-interest-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >




                __________________________________
                Do you Yahoo!?
                Meet the all-new My Yahoo! - Try it today!
                http://my.yahoo.com
              • Monty Zukowski
                ... Sorry, it was PXSL. http://community.moertel.com/pxsl/ Monty
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 30, 2004
                  On Nov 30, 2004, at 12:44 PM, Matt Benson wrote:

                  >
                  > Monty: I have heard of and read about YAML before,
                  > but not PSLT. Googling doesn't seem to yield useful
                  > results. Got a link?
                  >

                  Sorry, it was PXSL.

                  http://community.moertel.com/pxsl/


                  Monty
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.